DOWNLOAD PDF VERSION OF AGENDA

General Sessions

Networking

Other Meetings

Track 1: Response Research

Track 2: Planning and Preparedness

Track 3: Evolving Response Technologies

Track 4: Emerging Trends and Concerns

Track 5: Response/Restoration

Track 6: Training and Exercise Best Management Practices

Track 7: Inland Preparedness and Response

Track 8: Applied Response Techniques

Track: Exhibitor Showcase Theater

Workshops

Monday, October 28

8:00 am - 5:00 pm
CTEH OSRO Air Monitoring Workshop (Invitation Only)
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1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Workshop: Oil Spill Response 201: The Role of Science and Technology in Support of the Realities of Spill Response
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Registration fee: complimentary, sponsored by API

The underlying concepts for this workshop draw from a number of emergency response training courses that have been provided by and to government and industry responders over the years. The purpose of this workshop is to continue the discussion between researchers and spill response practitioners in conjunction with real world incident management considerations in order to enhance the use of science in support of emergency response decision-making. A good understanding beyond the basics of spill response capabilities and realities by a wide range of stakeholders and interested parties is important for the broader spill response community to be as effective as possible.


Desired outcomes include:

·        Greater understanding of the imperatives behind response actions and the decision-making process (especially as they often occur during a very hectic time with limited opportunities for deep scientific discourses)

·        Exploration of the potential roles of Research Scientists and how they may be used as Technical Specialists

·        Enhanced awareness of ICS/IMS and SIMA/NEBA processes used during the planning, initial, and ongoing phases of an emergency response

·        A more in-depth knowledge of SIMA through a facilitated practical approach

·        A focus on the science associated with spill response and how specific research results can help inform the decision-making process


Who Should Attend:

·        Members of the wider spill response community to take part in the ongoing discussion of the science and reality of emergency response

·        Academic researchers wishing to engage with response practitioners and government agency personnel

·        Members of the response community who wish to gain more practical knowledge of how to conduct a SIMA

·        Other participants wanting to learn more about emergency preparedness and response

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Tulis [salutation] => [firstname] => Dana [lastname] => Tulis [title] => Director, Emergency Management [suffix] => [company] => U. S. Coast Guard [bio] => Ms. Tulis assumed the duties of the Director, Incident Management and Preparedness Policy (CG-5RI) in January 2016. She is responsible for establishing, developing, and implementing policies, strategies, and goals to meet Coast Guard's Incident Response Mission. She provides strategic programmatic oversight for the Offices of Search and Rescue, Contingency Preparedness and Exercise, Marine Environmental Response, and the National Response Center. Prior to this position, Ms. Tulis served as both the Deputy Office Director and Acting Office Director for the Office of Emergency Management for the Environmental Protection Agency. She served in these SES positions from 2004 to 2016. She managed a $250 million budget and 75 staff, chaired the 15-Agency National Response Team and provided direction to the Regional Response Teams and the Agency's National Incident Coordination Team for preparedness and response for large scale national emergencies. She provided leadership to EPA's preparedness and response programs for chemical, biological, and radiological and nuclear agents including the management of mobile analytical assets. She also provided strategic direction to the Agency's chemical and oil regulatory prevention programs. During the Deepwater Horizon Response, Ms. Tulis served as the Agency's National Incident Coordinator; overseeing the Agency's Emergency Operations Center and coordinating with USCG, NOAA, and EPA leadership. She provided Agency guidance to responses such as Superstorm Sandy, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Joplin Tornado, Yellowstone River Oil Spill, Midwest Flooding as well as day-to-day Emergency Responses and Removals. Prior to OEM, Ms. Tulis served as the Center Director, Analytical Operations/Data Quality Center for EPA's Office of Emergency and Remedial Response. In this role, she directly supported the World Trade Center response and ensured the sampling and interpretation of over 235,000 laboratory analyses and supported the risk assessment and cleanup efforts. Ms. Tulis' prior positions at EPA included serving as the Director of the Implementation Division and Chief of the Operations Branch in the Office of Underground Storage Tanks. Ms. Tulis is a native New Yorker, possesses bachelor degrees in Biology and Psychology from Colby College and a Master's Degree in Environmental Engineering from Duke University. Ms. Tulis has received Special Commemorative Awards for the National Anthrax Cleanup, the World Trade Center response and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita; five EPA Agency Awards including the Science Award for Bacillus Anthracis and seven EPA Bronze Medals. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001OAdwqMADw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-25T17:09:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nkq7EAA [contactid] => 003C000001hSvGXIA0 [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Paul Schuler [salutation] => [firstname] => Paul [lastname] => Schuler [title] => Director, External Affairs [suffix] => [company] => Oil Spill Response Limited [bio] => Paul is the Director of External Affairs (Americas) for Oil Spill Response Limited. He has over 25 years in oil spill preparedness and response including 23 years as President/CEO of Clean Caribbean & Americas. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-25T17:01:29Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nkqHEAQ [contactid] => 003C000002G33EGIAZ [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Colin Frazier [salutation] => [firstname] => Colin [lastname] => Frazier [title] => Policy Advisor [suffix] => [company] => American Petroleum Institute [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-25T17:01:43Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) [6] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nkqWEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001MF2oRIAT [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Mike Drieu [salutation] => [firstname] => Mike [lastname] => Drieu [title] => HSE Advisor [suffix] => [company] => Occidental Petroleum [bio] => Michael Drieu is EHS Advisor for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation for technical and management expertise concerning subsea source control key resources, procedures, preparedness, planning and response Technical resource for clarification to regulations, expectations, incident response and management plans and processes. The job also includes in a thorough understanding of the industry Source Control equipment such as general operability and capability. Mike was previously Manager, Response Preparedness - WellCONTAINED for Wild Well Control, Inc., a Houston, Texas based company specializing in worldwide firefighting, well control and related engineering, marine engineering and training services. Expanded position to include subsea well control procedures and exercises, and assisting managing subsea containment equipment for 16 oil and gas operators At Wild Well, Michael has also served as a Project Manager for GOM platform recovery work including costs estimates, asset acquisitions, onshore and offshore project planning, development and implementation of recovery procedures for oil and gas production platforms. He also serves as Incident Commander for WWCI's Spill Management Team. Michael received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from U.S. Coast Guard Academy on 1984 Since April 2010, Mike has played an active role working at Source Control Command Post during the DW Horizon Oil Spill supporting Intervention, Containment and SIMOPS activities. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-25T17:02:01Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 7 ) [7] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nkqqEAA [contactid] => 003C000001yJZ8BIAW [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Abigail Renegar Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Abigail [lastname] => Renegar [title] => Sales [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Nova Southeastern University [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-25T17:02:21Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 9 ) [8] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nkr0EAA [contactid] => 003C000001YsroaIAB [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Tim Nedwed Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Tim [lastname] => Nedwed [title] => STP-A [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company [bio] => Dr. Nedwed is the Oil Spill Response Senior Technical Professional with ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (URC). He has worked for ExxonMobil for 20 years and has led the URC oil spill response research program for the last 15 years. Dr. Nedwed's primary expertise is on oil spill response technologies with a focus on dispersants, in situ burning, remote detection of oil, and oil spill fate and effects. He led two major joint industry projects to develop and understand the use of dispersants in the Arctic and the use of dispersants subsea. The achievements of Dr. Nedwed were recognized by ExxonMobil's Upstream Research Company when he received the 2010 ICE award for outstanding innovation and creativity. In addition, Dr. Nedwed received the prestigious Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award for Technology Innovation given by the Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas in 2013. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T19:55:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 10 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => Array ( [0] => 0693b0000077OhlAAE ) [sponsorlogos] => Array ( [0] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077OhlAAEw200h100.png ) [modified] => 2019-10-07T19:55:57Z )
1:00 pm - 5:30 pm
The CLEAN GULF 2019 Golf Tournament
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Time:   Registration at 1:00 PM (Practice Range- 1:15 PM – 1:45 PM). Shotgun start at 2:00 PM


Place:  Lakewood Golf Club 4801 General de Gaulle Dr., New Orleans, LA 70131 

(504) 373-5926


Entry Fee: $100.00 per person/$375.00 per foursome (Fee Includes: Course Fee, Range Balls, Cart, Drink Tickets, Awards Reception and PRIZES including HOLE IN ONE)


Format: Four-man scramble; if you do not enter a team list, you will be placed with others. 


Policies: Full refunds, less a $75 processing fee, will be provided for written cancellation requests received before September 27, 2019. No refunds, regardless of circumstance, will be provided after September 27, 2019. Tournament registrations are transferable. 


Club Rental: A limited number of rental clubs are available at the club. Please contact Dana McClay at dmcclay@accessintel.com for information on club rental and availability. 


Click here to access the PDF registration form or add it to your registration when you register for CLEAN GULF online. You must be registered for CLEAN GULF to play in the Tournament.  

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => 1 [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-03T21:34:52Z )
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
1A: Overall and Slick Thickness
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This session will provide a brief summary of research and development projects funded by BSEE Oil Spill Preparedness Division. Additionally, three specific projects will be presented. 

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zTpiyEAC [name] => Track 1: Response Research ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgXCEAY [contactid] => 003C000001nfUHHIA2 [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Gary Petrae [salutation] => [firstname] => Gary [lastname] => Petrae [title] => Senior Preparedness Analyst [suffix] => [company] => Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) [bio] => Gary is a Senior Preparedness Analyst in the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Oil Spill Preparedness Division, Gulf of Mexico Preparedness Section in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Section is responsible for regulatory compliance with the Oil Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line - 30 CFR Part 254
Prior to joining BSEE, Gary served as a NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator on the Deepwater Horizon MC252 Incident Management Team. Previously, Gary was with the NOAA Commissioned Corps where two of his career assignments were as Scientific Support Coordinator in Miami and Long Beach and as Chief SSC where he also served as the NOAA Regional Response Team representative to Regions Four, Six and Caribbean. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lapaMAA [contactid] => 003C000001PWPtGIAX [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => BSEE's Oil Spill Response Research Program [abstract] => Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) manages a comprehensive, long-term research program dedicated to improving spill response countermeasures for oil spills in offshore environments, including the Arctic. BSEE is focused on improving the methods and technologies used for oil spill preparedness and response - including mechanical collection and clean up, in-situ burning, the use of dispersants, herder applications, temporary storage, and remote detection. The Oil Spill Preparedness Division (OSPD)'s Oil Spill Response Research (OSRR) program is a cooperative effort bringing together funding and expertise from research partners in government agencies, industry and the international community. This presentation will highlight BSEE's ongoing and recently completed research projects conducted by the Response Research Branch (RRB) that is of specific interest to the Gulf of Mexico Region. The research will include: • The use of dispersants; • The application of herders; • In-situ burning; and • Technology enhancements aimed at improving mechanical recovery. [name] => Kristi McKinney [salutation] => [firstname] => Kristi [lastname] => McKinney [title] => Engineer - Research Program Manager [suffix] => [company] => The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement [bio] => Kristi McKinney is a research program manager in the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement's Oil Spill Preparedness Division, Response Research Branch. She has been with BSEE for 8 years , primarily working on research projects in the area of mechanical containment and recovery, focused on new technology development, enhancements to current technologies, and development of testing protocols. Previously she worked as a mechanical design engineer for a defense contractor, and as a package engineer for a pharmaceutical manufacturing company. She received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Trinity University in San Antonio, TX, and a Masters of Science in Systems Engineering from The George Washington University. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-10T12:15:47Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lIcAMAU [contactid] => 003C000002QHOIEIA5 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => In Situ Measurement of Oil Slick Thickness in Open Water Environments [abstract] => During an oil spill response, one of the parameters impacting the choice and management of the applied cleaning technique is the thickness of the floating oil. Studies have shown that technologies to accurately measure oil thickness in real-time under open water operational conditions are not commercially available. Aiming to enhance the efficiency of the currently used cleanup processes, we present the development of a capacitive-based measurement device that can measure the thickness of various types of floating oil. The presented device measures the capacitance of the oil/water/air that it contacts and uses this data to estimate the locations of the oil-air and oil-water interfaces. Determining the interfaces location provides the data necessary to calculate the thickness of the oil layer. This sensor can operate in open water environments while being dragged through waves, and does not require any calibration against different types of oil or water. In addition, the device is equipped with specialized software- and hardware-based mechanisms to mitigate the fouling problem caused by highly-viscous oils. The sensor is designed to be vertically mounted to a skimmer, boom, or floating buoy and provide thickness readings (up to 50cm) remotely, A second configuration allows a user to measure readings directly from a handheld unit (up to 10cm). To assess the performance of the sensor, extensive testing of the initial prototype was performed at Ohmsett facility. The experimental results demonstrated high sensor accuracy in most of the test cases. Based on the testing results, several improvements were identified and are currently being implemented to enhance the performance of the sensor while working under harsh dynamic-liquid conditions. Acknowledgment: This study was funded by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC, USA, under Award #140E0118C0003. This abstract does not signify that the contents necessarily reflect the views and policies of the BSEE, nor does mention of the trade names or commercial products constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. [name] => Imad Elhajj [salutation] => [firstname] => Imad [lastname] => Elhajj [title] => Professor [suffix] => [company] => American University of Beirut [bio] => Imad H. Elhajj received his Bachelor of Engineering in Computer and Communications Engineering, with distinction, from the American University of Beirut in 1997 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Michigan State University in 1999 and 2002, respectively. He is currently a Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the American University of Beirut. In 2014, he co-founded, with two other professors in ECE, SAUGO 360 the first startup to be incubated at AUB. Dr. Elhajj is the past chair of IEEE Lebanon Section, senior member of IEEE and senior member of ACM. He is an ABET program evaluator. His research interests include instrumentation and robotics, cyber security, sensor and computer networks, and multimedia networking. Imad received the Best Research Paper Award at the Third International Conference on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology (CBP), the Best Paper award at the IEEE Electro Information Technology Conference in June 2003, and the Best Paper Award at the International Conference on Information Society in the 21st Century in November 2000. Dr. Elhajj is recipient of the Teaching Excellence Award at the American University of Beirut, June 2011, the Kamal Salibi Academic Freedom Award, 2014, and the most Outstanding Graduate Student Award from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Michigan State University in April 2001. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078dIlAAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T17:08:42Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002QHOIJIA5 [name] => Mahdi Saleh [firstname] => Mahdi [lastname] => Saleh [title] => PhD Student [company] => American University of Beirut ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002QHOIOIA5 [name] => Daniel Asmar [firstname] => Daniel [lastname] => Asmar [title] => Associate Professor [company] => American University of Beirut ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lQ1oMAE [contactid] => 003C000001nfUEAIA2 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Measurement of Slick Thickness and Dispersant Effectiveness from Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Platforms [abstract] => Ensuring the effectiveness of oil spill remediation methods is essential for optimizing spill response. In order to provide that capability, field measurements of spilled oil properties are necessary. Specifically, measuring the slick thickness is important for: directing responders to the thickest portions of the slick; in determining skimmer effectiveness; and in measuring the In-situ Burn (ISB) rate and efficiency. In addition to the slick thickness, subsurface oil droplet size distribution is vital in determining dispersant effectiveness, optimizing dispersant applications, and determining the fate and transport of the oil in the water column. We have been developing acoustic methods to measure these parameters in laboratory environments and are transferring the technology to ROV and AUV platforms for deployment during spill response efforts. We have shown the ability to measure slick thickness of oil as thin as ~750 micrometers and up to 15 centimeters thick in ice fields as well in over 50 wave states including harbor chop and up to sea state 3 with waves as high as 58 cm (23 inches). These measurements were performed in the Ohmsett wave tank which measures 203 meters long by 20 meters wide with a 2.4 meter water depth and one meter freeboard. The tank is filled with 2.6 million gallons of salt water and allows for multiple wave states to be achieved by virtue of a programmable wave generator. We will present results showing the slick thickness in calm waters could be accurately measured within 0.2 mm (2%) with an uncertainty of 170 micrometers of the known slick thickness of slicks that was alternatively verified. In sea state 3 the precision of the measurement was 0.4 mm, which represented a 9% variation for various oils at ambient temperatures. This demonstrated thickness measurement capability has been delivered to Ohmsett and separately used to measure the burn rate and efficiency during ISB, and for herder effectiveness. In addition, we developed acoustic measurements of oil droplet size and gas bubble size distribution to track the effectiveness of dispersant applications. We will present results of these acoustic measurements of dispersant effectiveness and gas bubble size distribution from an ROV platform at Ohmsett for subsurface releases of an Alaskan crude oil dispersed with Corexit 9500. These measurement capabilities can potentially be used to direct cleanup efforts and optimize spill response. This research was funded by BSEE under Contract E15PC00005. [name] => Paul Panetta [salutation] => [firstname] => Paul [lastname] => Panetta [title] => Chief Scientist [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Applied Research Associates, Inc. | Ohmsett [bio] => Paul Panetta, Ph.D. Lab Director and Chief Scientist of Ohmsett Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA) Education Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 1999 Dissertation: Ultrasonic wave propagation and microstructure characterization M.S., Condensed Matter Physics, Iowa State University, 1994 Thesis Topic: High Temperature Superconductivity B.S., Applied Physics, University of California-Davis, 1991 Experience Chief Scientist of Ohmsett 2018-Present Lab Director and Acoustics Subject Matter Expert 2009-Present Applied Research Associates, Inc., Littleton, CO Dr. Panetta is the Chief Scientist of Ohmsett and Oil Spill Response Lab Director at Applied Research Associates, Inc. Dr. Panetta's work focuses on acoustic and ultrasonic materials characterization for oil spill response, marine sediments, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications. His work spans from experimental to theoretical and prototype instrument development. Dr. Panetta is currently developing methods to measure the burn rate and efficiency during in-situ burning of oil, developing measurements of herder effectiveness, and transferring these acoustic measurements to ROV and glider platforms. His team is also developing scattering methods to measure oil droplet size to characterize dispersant effectiveness. His work has led to five patents and many publications. Dr. Panetta has over 20 years of experience, with expertise in experimental and theoretical development of ultrasonic scattering to characterize oils, liquids, solid-liquid suspensions, microstructures of steel, nickel, and titanium alloys. Dr. Panetta and his group recently developed an ultrasonic metallurgical tool under Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funding that determines grain size from ultrasonic scattering measurements in nickel super alloys. The methods and software tool were tested at several aircraft engine manufacturing sites and validated through a blind test, bringing it to a TRL 6. Dr. Panetta has been funded a project by the Department of Transportation, the Pipeline Research Council International, and the Department of Energy to measure residual stress using in gas pipelines using ultrasonic birefringence techniques with Electro Magnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) and gained rich experiences in performing the wave speed measurement using EMATs. In previous work for the Department of the Interior, Dr. Panetta's team developed scattering methods to measure oil droplet size to characterize dispersants for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE). [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T16:18:57Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 0038000000dOsmDAAS [name] => Alan Guarino [firstname] => Alan [lastname] => Guarino [title] => Senior Test Engineer [company] => Applied Research Associates, Inc. | Ohmsett ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lZ7qMAE [contactid] => 003C000002RW1j0IAD [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Capabilities and Limitations of Oil Spill Thickness Determination from Synthetic Aperture Radar [abstract] => Effective oil spill response requires accurate identification of the areas within a slick that contain the most oil. A variety of methods are available to delineate slick extent, but the standard method for determining thickness is still visual inspection by trained observers. This is manpower intensive, must be done in daylight hours and under particular lighting conditions, and provides but a rough estimate of thickness for the thicker layers that contain the bulk of the oil. A significant advancement is needed in technology and processing methods that support wide-area, rapid detection and characterization of oil slick properties, particularly those that support low latency information delivery through in-flight data downlink and rapid processing. Because of the all- weather, day-night operation offered by the active radar sensor technology, synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which does not require solar illumination of the surface, is already used for slick detection. We have examined the capabilities and limitations of the use of SAR for determination of oil thickness in slicks on open water. Through a study funded by BSEE, we have examined all data acquired over oil slicks by the UAVSAR L-band SAR sensor to determine the range of intensities and the dependence upon wind conditions. Based on the UAVSAR data, we have developed an automated method for classifying oil by its relative thickness. The results can be calibrated based on field observations to obtain a Bonn-like classification. Further, we have used an electromagnetic scattering model to evaluate whether the oil-to-water ratio or the oil thickness can be quantified based upon backscatter intensities alone, constrained only by information about metocean conditions. The sensitivity to the oil properties and ocean temperature and salinity are explored. The methods and results of the study will be presented. [name] => Cathleen Jones, PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Cathleen [lastname] => Jones [title] => Signal Analysis Engineer [suffix] => PhD [company] => Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) [bio] => Cathleen E. Jones is a radar scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, where her research is focused on using synthetic aperture radar remote sensing to study natural and man-made hazards. Her research includes development of methods to identify hazards affecting flood control and water conveyance infrastructure, studying subsidence and land building in deltaic environments, and tracking and characterizing oil slicks to help in response and recovery. She is one of four science team leads for the NASA NISAR mission, responsible for advancing utilization of the mission's data for societal benefit. She received a B.S. in physics from Texas A&M and a Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RW1j5IAD [name] => Xueyang Duan [firstname] => Xueyang [lastname] => Duan [title] => Systems Engineer [company] => Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RW1jAIAT [name] => Benjamin Holt [firstname] => Benjamin [lastname] => Holt [title] => Research Scientist [company] => Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => 2 [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-10T12:15:47Z )
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Workshop: Homeland Security Challenges including Terror Threats
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Registration fee: complimentary, sponsored by DomPrep

 

This workshop will present and discuss clear and present homeland threats and security issues, including:

  • Hybrid warfare on the homeland, what it is and why you should care
  • Consequence and interagency interdependencies
  • Vulnerabilities from UAS (drones) and other unmanned weapons
  • Cybersecurity and Social Media vulnerabilities

 

Who Should Attend:

  • Members of the U.S. Coast Guard, Department of Defense; Department of Homeland Security; Environmental Protection Agency; state and local emergency management, environmental response, and first responders (including law enforcement, fire departments, and hazardous materials teams); port authorities, facility and vessel security officers, contingency and business continuity planners
  • Contractors involved in security and emergency response

 

Workshop Leader

Joseph Leonard MEP, PCP, CEM, CHS-V (CDR, USCG, ret.), Principal Consultant, Penta Consortium, LLC


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1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Workshop: Four Chairs One Table (IV) NEW FORMAT!
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Registration fee: no charge sponsored by Witt O’Brien’s and conducted by O'Brien's Response Management LLC


The ‘Four Chairs One Table’ unique workshop design is instructive for all attendees of CLEAN GULF to gain a much deeper understanding of the perspectives, responsibilities and decisions made by the multiple stakeholders to a significant event. This year’s Event Scenario will involve a shoreside/near shore GOM asset and allow you to: 

  1. Gain a deeper understanding of Unified Command and other stakeholder perspectives and the decisions they face
  2. Increase knowledge and best practices responding to an incident involving and interacting in a Unified Command environment
  3. Compare and contrast priorities, decisions and actions involving operations focused Incident Management and company leadership team Crisis Management during a response
  4. Discussion on the role and responsibilities of the Public Information Officer (PIO) and Company Crisis Communications in a significant event


Who Should Attend:

The ‘4 Chairs One Table’ workshop, due to its’ unique delivery approach, is designed to benefit all attendees of Clean Gulf regardless of their typical role in an incident:

  • Operating companies/potential responsible party personnel (Upstream/Midstream/Downstream), including marine/vessel companies
  • Members of the USCG, EPA, PHMSA, other state & local emergency management offices
  • OSRO’s and other contractors involved in emergency response
  • Others that play a role or are directly impacted by the decisions of the Unified Command such as members of an Incident Management Team and other stakeholders
[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000mMoWcEAK [name] => Workshops ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mFCHEA2 [contactid] => 003C000001I6YpDIAV [function] => Workshop Leader [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bob Patterson [salutation] => [firstname] => Bob [lastname] => Patterson [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => Witt O'Brien's [bio] => Bob is Managing Director at Witt O'Brien's and oversees the 225+ PetroChem response management and consulting relationships for Witt O'Brien's. Bob has 35 years' experience in risk management and operations best practices for the Oil & Gas, manufacturing and financial industries. His experience involves Crisis Management, Incident management, and Emergency Response. During his tenure at Witt O'Brien's, Bob has facilitated, coached or participated in over 500 incidents, exercises and/or training sessions for his PetroChem clients. Bob has a BS in Business from Bryant College, and an MBA in Business from The University of Georgia. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001NnhMfMAJw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-17T22:01:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mFCREA2 [contactid] => 003C000002OBzOAIA1 [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Grace Burley [salutation] => [firstname] => Grace [lastname] => Burley [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => Witt O'Brien's [bio] => Grace has nearly two decades of experience in the crisis management industry. She has managed comprehensive planning, training, and exercise programs for companies and organizations in various industries. She has received her business continuity certification from Business Continuity Institute. Her strength is developing customized preparedness programs that effectively integrate: • Crisis Management • Business Continuity • Emergency Management • Crisis Communications • Human Impact/People Support/Workplace Violence • IT Disaster Recovery [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000790K4AAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-09T16:08:19Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mFClEAM [contactid] => 003C000001JxZl6IAF [function] => Instructor [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Aaron Holten [salutation] => [firstname] => Aaron [lastname] => Holten [title] => Emergency Response Coordi [suffix] => [company] => Witt O'Brien's [bio] => Aaron has over 20 years of experience in environmental compliance and safety, with an emphasis in emergency response and incident management. He has directly managed or been part of the management team for numerous emergency response incidents, ranging from natural disasters and marine casualties to hazardous materials and oil spill responses in offshore, coastal and inland environments. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000790JzAAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-09T16:07:35Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => 5 [sponsorlogoids] => Array ( [0] => 0693b00000790EGAAY ) [sponsorlogos] => Array ( [0] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000790EGAAYw200h100.png ) [modified] => 2019-10-03T21:43:24Z )
2:45 pm - 4:15 pm
1B: Emulsions, Recovery, and Sampling
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This session will provide presentations describing the creation of long-term stable emulsions, unique burner development for emulsified oils, novel measurements of oil-water mixtures to measure skimmer efficiency and innovative sampling techniques. 

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zTpiyEAC [name] => Track 1: Response Research ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgXqEAI [contactid] => 003C000001nfUEAIA2 [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Paul Panetta [salutation] => [firstname] => Paul [lastname] => Panetta [title] => Chief Scientist [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Applied Research Associates, Inc. | Ohmsett [bio] => Paul Panetta, Ph.D. Lab Director and Chief Scientist of Ohmsett Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA) Education Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 1999 Dissertation: Ultrasonic wave propagation and microstructure characterization M.S., Condensed Matter Physics, Iowa State University, 1994 Thesis Topic: High Temperature Superconductivity B.S., Applied Physics, University of California-Davis, 1991 Experience Chief Scientist of Ohmsett 2018-Present Lab Director and Acoustics Subject Matter Expert 2009-Present Applied Research Associates, Inc., Littleton, CO Dr. Panetta is the Chief Scientist of Ohmsett and Oil Spill Response Lab Director at Applied Research Associates, Inc. Dr. Panetta's work focuses on acoustic and ultrasonic materials characterization for oil spill response, marine sediments, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications. His work spans from experimental to theoretical and prototype instrument development. Dr. Panetta is currently developing methods to measure the burn rate and efficiency during in-situ burning of oil, developing measurements of herder effectiveness, and transferring these acoustic measurements to ROV and glider platforms. His team is also developing scattering methods to measure oil droplet size to characterize dispersant effectiveness. His work has led to five patents and many publications. Dr. Panetta has over 20 years of experience, with expertise in experimental and theoretical development of ultrasonic scattering to characterize oils, liquids, solid-liquid suspensions, microstructures of steel, nickel, and titanium alloys. Dr. Panetta and his group recently developed an ultrasonic metallurgical tool under Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funding that determines grain size from ultrasonic scattering measurements in nickel super alloys. The methods and software tool were tested at several aircraft engine manufacturing sites and validated through a blind test, bringing it to a TRL 6. Dr. Panetta has been funded a project by the Department of Transportation, the Pipeline Research Council International, and the Department of Energy to measure residual stress using in gas pipelines using ultrasonic birefringence techniques with Electro Magnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) and gained rich experiences in performing the wave speed measurement using EMATs. In previous work for the Department of the Interior, Dr. Panetta's team developed scattering methods to measure oil droplet size to characterize dispersants for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE). [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T16:18:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lYTTMA2 [contactid] => 003C000002RW0FYIA1 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Improved Oil Recovery Sensor [abstract] => A novel sensor specifically designed to meet the needs of the offshore oil recovery industry was developed and tested. The sensor has the ability to monitor oil in water concentrations from 0 to 100% regardless of water salinity. This removes the fundamental limitation of dielectric sensors that cannot work with high electrical conductivity mixtures, for instance seawater-based mixtures that contain more than ~30% of sea water. The new sensor combines two measurement principles: a dielectric measurement and an eddy current loss measurement. The dielectric measurement is used for high oil content mixtures and emulsions that are of water-in-oil type, leading to a relatively low electrical conductivity. The eddy current measurement is used for low oil content mixtures and emulsions, that are of oil-in-water type, and have high electrical conductivity. Both measurements are carried out at high frequencies, in the 10-50 MHz range, which makes the measurement insensitive to the type of oil and its dispersion, polarization effects, while maintaining sufficiently large skin penetration depths. The sensor was demonstrated in laboratory tests as well as at the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement's (BSEE's) Ohmsett testing facility using mixtures of several crude and refined oils with water salinities in the 1-5% range. In all cases, the sensor provided a reliable oil content measurement with average errors of about 3% in a laboratory setting and about 7% during Ohmsett testing. This accuracy is sufficient for offshore oil recovery operations. The sensor can be constructed as an open section of a pipe without any flow restrictions and with a minimal pressure drop. The prototype sensor was designed to be installed in an oil skimmer recovery hose. It uses a 22"-long, 4" diameter pipe with standard 4" camlock fittings. The primary application of the sensor is for offshore oil spill recovery operations where currently responders do not have a quantitative method for knowing how much water they are collecting with their oil. The new sensor will provide this information in real time allowing for reduction of seawater that must be processed and stored, increasing space for recovered oil and reducing number of trips between recovery vessels and storage barges. These improvements in oil recovery efficiency will reduce costs and duration of oil recovery operations. This research program was founded and supported by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, Oil Spill Preparedness Division, Response Research Branch under BSEE project 1083. The authors would like to thank both BSEE and Ohmsett personnel for their support. [name] => Slawomir Winecki [salutation] => [firstname] => Slawomir [lastname] => Winecki [title] => Senior Research Scientist [suffix] => PhD [company] => Battelle [bio] => Dr. Winecki has 20 years of experience working on projects related to solving technical problems through physics and chemical engineering. His chemical engineering expertise includes scale up of chemical processes, chemical reaction and reactor modeling, development of chemical decontamination and air filtration systems, wastewater treatment, and battery and catalyst material development. Physics related skills include experimental atomic physics, design and construction of ultra-high vacuum equipment, construction of ion-sources and ion accelerators, X-ray and Auger electron spectroscopy, physics of ion-atom and ion-surface collisions, development of novel sensor systems, and development and evaluation of advanced materials. Dr. Winecki worked on multiple scale up projects including development of Battelle's biomass pyrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction wastewater treatment, and cascade reverse osmosis processes. Prior to joining Battelle in 2011, he worked for NanoScale Corporation, a Kansas-based specialty chemical company specializing in synthesis of nanocrystalline metal oxides and development of their applications. While at NanoScale, Dr. Winecki, led the development of nanocrystalline metal oxide and metal nanoparticle colloid production processes. He authored and co-authored over 100 proposals to various government and commercial clients and served as Principal Investigator on over 20 research projects. Dr. Winecki authored numerous scientific reports and peer review publications, including two book chapters, five issued patents, and about ten pending patent applications, as well as presenting at numerous conferences. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078y1FAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T13:54:23Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcdxMAA [contactid] => 003C000002RWEKcIAP [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Supporting Emergency Response: Technological Advancements and Sampling Improvements [abstract] => Critical and timely advancements in methodology has resulted in sampling efficiencies and corresponding improvements in sample integrity. Another benefit has been the overall improvement in the quality of the data produced using the advanced techniques. Historically, the traditional EPA approved methods, that are used to conduct environmental analyses, have required up to 1 liter of collected sample and a proportionate amount of solvents and/or reagents to process them. Innovative changes to techniques allow for an environmentally friendly alternative that results in smaller sample sizes and minimizes the number of containers necessary to collect the required samples for any project. Comparison data will be shown to demonstrate the advantages of the reduced volume and lesser container methods. Additional information will show that the chemistry in the method has remained unchanged and the advancements are EPA method compliant and accepted. These improvements have resulted in less time in the field, fewer containers to handle, a significant decrease in cooler weight and size, and extended hold times. These benefits result in no sacrifice to quality or sensitivity. All of this progress equates to time savings, especially in emergency response situations where conservation of time and process efficiency are critical to total response, containment, and removal. [name] => Judith Morgan [salutation] => [firstname] => Judith [lastname] => Morgan [title] => VP, Chief Compliance & Training Officer [suffix] => [company] => Pace Analytical - Corporate [bio] => Judith (Judy) Morgan Ms. Morgan has over 30 years of experience in analytical testing and compliance. She is currently Vice President and Chief Compliance/Training Officer for Pace Analytical Services, LLC. In her role she provides the leadership and experience required to manage a strong compliance program and deliver quality career development and training initiatives. Her background includes oversight of compliance, implementation of quality assurance programs, green initiatives, environmental health/safety and sustainability, numerous international quality standards, waste disposal/minimization, and ethics and confidentiality. Well known to the industry she is, a respected expert witness, formerly a registered lobbyist, and has previous experience as an analyst in both organic and inorganic methods. Her extensive experience and dedication to the testing industry has allowed her to apply knowledge and expertise as an active member for multiple National/Federal Committees for several organizations such as TNI, ACIL, SETAC, A2LA, and EPA. In addition to participation she has held multiple roles including, chairman, board member, ethics officer, vice president, treasurer, member and speaker/presenter. In addition to her B.S. Degree in Chemistry and M.S. degree in Analytical Chemistry, Ms. Morgan has completed research focused on environmental analysis at Vanderbilt University. She holds membership to professional organizations including the American Chemical Society, American Society for Quality, American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078qqvAAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-08T04:56:13Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RWEKhIAP [name] => Johnny Mitchell [firstname] => Johnny [lastname] => Mitchell [title] => Vice President of Operations [company] => Pace National ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABHPsEAP [contactid] => 003C000002Inf8SIAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Generation of Long-Term Stable Emulsions at Ohmsett [abstract] => [name] => Leonard Zabilansky P.E. [salutation] => [firstname] => Leonard [lastname] => Zabilansky [title] => Ohmsett Program Manager [suffix] => P.E. [company] => Applied Research Associates [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-03T15:13:59Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-08T04:56:13Z )
4:15 pm - 5:00 pm
BSEE Compliance Activities
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This meeting will provide an opportunity for the BSEE Oil Spill Preparedness Division to update and hear from attendees on ongoing regulatory activities related to oil spill response plan submission and compliance; verification of response equipment readiness; evaluation of response team exercises and training; and, the OSPD unannounced exercise program.

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5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
NEW - Women in Emergency Management Happy Hour
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Open to all registration categories

Clean Gulf’s first ever Women in Emergency Management happy hour, promotes camaraderie, informal dialogue/conversation and networking in support of the growing community of women in preparedness, response, and recovery. All specialties welcome, e.g., operations, science, outreach and more! During this reception, attendees can make new inspiring connections across a broad range of experienced women and reinforce existing relationships with key stakeholders in the energy industry, government, and consultancies. 

Welcome by Dr. Karolien Debusschere, Deputy Director, Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator’s Office (LOSCO) with opening remarks from Capt. Kristi Luttrell, Sector Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans.

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5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Haunted Ghosts & Spirits Tour in the French Quarter
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Price: $35 per person

Meeting location: 400 Toulouse Street in the French Quarter (Grayline Lighthouse)

 

New Orleans is often referred to as “The Most Haunted City in America”. Add Halloween to the mix… it’s sure to be a spooky week at CLEAN GULF!

 

Join your colleagues for a haunted walking tour in the French Quarter at dusk on Monday, October 28th. This is a private guided tour exclusively for CLEAN GULF attendees.


The Quarter is filled with colorful characters who lived, died and have chosen to remain in this historic city. Attendees will meet in the French Quarter for a group tour of the 300 year old European neighborhood. Your tour guide will stop along the route to show off some haunts and to tell the rich, historic secrets of the long departed. It’s a can’t miss, Halloween week networking event!

 

Attendees will meet at 400 Toulouse Street – the Grayline Lighthouse next to the Mississippi River in the French Quarter. Our guide will bring attendees on the 2-hour experience (with stops for cocktails along the way!) and will end the tour in the Quarter at the perfect time to grab dinner. Attendees should arrive 15 minutes prior to departure to avoid missing group.

 

Sign up with your CLEAN GULF registration or contact our customer services team at register@cleangulf.org or (301) 354-2101 to add to your existing reservation. Questions? Contact Dana McClay at dmcclay@accessintel.com.

 

*Please note – price includes the two-hour tour and tip for guide. Cocktails along the way are not included. 

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Tuesday, October 29

9:00 am - 10:00 am
Keynote Session
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10:00 am - 10:45 am
Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall, sponsored by BNSF
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10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Count Dracula's Blood Drive - Day 1
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What better way to help mankind and celebrate Halloween at the same time than to donate blood? CLEAN GULF is hosting a Mobile Blood Drive in the Exhibit Hall. Sign-up in advance by clicking here, or wander by and sign up onsite. We promise Count Dracula gets none, but you will walk away with a small token of our thanks and a pint lighter.

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10:45 am - 12:15 pm
Mega Session: Tank Fires and Channel Spill - Harris County & Houston - Air, Land, and Sea Event
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Significant events on the Houston Ship Channel in 2019 may alter the future landscape of response in the U.S. Of concern was the heavy impact on commerce and immediate and delayed exposure concerns for the public and responders.


Also of concern, were agency jurisdictional questions and the real-time impact of social media. Make plans to listen in on a discussion with professionals that were actively involved in both responses.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001196YSEAY [name] => General Sessions ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mCiuEAE [contactid] => 003C000002OBz82IAD [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => John Temperilli [salutation] => [firstname] => John [lastname] => Temperilli [title] => Vice President [suffix] => [company] => KSolv, Garner, OMI [bio] => John Temperilli is a Senior Crisis Management Professional with broad crisis management leadership and advisory experience in successful international and domestic crisis response. He has successfully responded and managed large scale Stafford Act events with numerous state and federal agencies, and numerous NCP (National Contingency Plan) Emergency events with EPA, USCG and relevant state agencies. He has spearheaded planning and gap analysis on a national catastrophic level. He has conducted training and exercises internationally in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and South America. He has been a program and project manager in the private sector for over 30 years. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001DrV2TMAVw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-06T18:50:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nAf7EAE [contactid] => 003C00000246K0BIAU [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Capt. Kevin Oditt [salutation] => Capt. [firstname] => Kevin [lastname] => Oditt [title] => Sector Commander [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard Sector Houston-Galveston [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078fSTAAYw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-09T20:45:05Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nDImEAM [contactid] => 003C000001P85ZFIAZ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bryant Smalley [salutation] => [firstname] => Bryant [lastname] => Smalley [title] => Oil Spill & Response Team Leader and Federal On-Scene Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => U.S. EPA, Region 6 [bio] => Bryant Smalley began his career at EPA as an Inspector in Region 6. He has conducted and overseen hundreds of compliance inspections throughout the years. Since 2010, he has served as a Federal On-Scene Coordinator, overseeing the cleanup of oil spills and chemical releases. Currently he is the lead for the Oil Spill & Response Team, implementing both the oil spill prevention and response program in EPA Region 6. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-02T16:27:39Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nAkMEAU [contactid] => 0033b00002SppjOAAR [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => R.W. "Bob" Royall Jr. [salutation] => [firstname] => R.W. "Bob" [lastname] => Royall [title] => Assistant Chief Emergency Operations [suffix] => Jr. [company] => Harris County Fire Marshall's Office [bio] => Bob Royall is the Assistant Chief, Emergency Operations with the Harris County Fire Marshal's Office in Harris County, TX, the third-most populous county in the U.S. He previously served as Sr. Captain and Assistant Coordinator for the Houston Fire Department HazMat Team. Chief Royall is a 45-plus year veteran of the fire service. He has more than 35 years of experience as a senior fire officer and holds an Advanced Firefighter, Fire Officer, Hazardous Materials Technician, and Incident Safety Officer certifications through the Texas Commission on Fire Protection. He is also credentialed as a Type-1 Incident Commander and Type-3 Operations Section Chief and Planning Section Chief with the Texas Forest Service. Bob is a recognized subject matter expert on matters of Homeland Security preparedness, emergency management, hazardous materials response, marine shipboard firefighting, and disaster response. Chief Royall proudly served as Deputy Area Commander for the Hurricane Katrina Astrodome Shelter Operation and as the Local On-scene Coordinator for the ESF-10 Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill response following Hurricane Ike. He has also responded to and directed an exceptional number of hazardous materials responses, major fires, shipboard fire fighting incidents, and has developed and implemented plans and strategies to enhance emergency response operations within the busiest port and largest petrochemical community in the United States. Bob is a long-time hazardous materials/WMD instructor, a published author and guest speaker, and serves on or chairs many national, state, and local committees including the NFPA 472/475 Technical Committee, the IAFC HazMat Committee, and the Texas Emergency Management Advisory Committee. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078prBAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-24T21:50:00Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nBDOEA2 [contactid] => 0033b00002SppzRAAR [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Michael "Mac" McClendon [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael "Mac" [lastname] => McClendon [title] => Director - Office of Public Health Preparation and Response [suffix] => [company] => Harris County Public Health [bio] => Mac McClendon joined Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services (HCPHES) in November 2005 as the Emergency Management Coordinator. In August 2006 he was named Chief, Office of Public Health Preparedness and in March 2007 was named Director, Office of Public Health Preparedness Emergency Management Coordinator. McClendon is responsible for all hazard planning and response to public health emergencies. He is also experienced in developing and implementing emergency preparedness plans within the all hazards framework and represents Public Health on many local, state and federal planning committees. McClendon was formerly the Emergency Response Chief for a major chemical manufacturer and has over 24 years of experience in emergency response and management including Fire, Heavy Rescue, Hazardous Materials and EMS. He served as the Safety Officer for the Unified Command, Reliant Park Sheltering Operation, post Hurricane Katrina. He is an original member of the Texas Task Force One Urban Search and Rescue Team where he serves as a Task Force Safety Officer and is also a member of the State of Texas Region 2 Type 3 Incident Management Team. McClendon also serves on the State Incident Management Team advisory board representing ESF8. McClendon is a member of the Strategic National Stockpile workgroup of the National Association of County and City Health Officials. He sits on the Harris County Citizen Emergency Response Team Council. He also serves on five Local Emergency Planning Committees. McClendon chairs the First Responder Health and Safety Committee for the Houston Urban area Security Initiative and he is a member of the Houston-Harris County BioWatch Advisory Committee. McClendon is also a member of the U.S. Coast Guard's Area Maritime Security Committee and the Security Advisory Council for the Texas Medical Center. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-03T19:22:43Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nAwhEAE [contactid] => 0033b00002SqsyyAAB [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Kendra Bernhagen [salutation] => [firstname] => Kendra [lastname] => Bernhagen [title] => Region 12 - Emergency Response Work Leader [suffix] => [company] => Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078oTzAAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-23T17:40:45Z [status] => Invited [placement] => 6 ) [6] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nAkgEAE [contactid] => 003C000001YsrfJIAR [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Paige Doelling Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Paige [lastname] => Doelling [title] => Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => NOAA/NOS/ORR/ERD [bio] => Dr. Paige Doelling has been the NOAA SSC for coastal Louisiana and Texas since late 2013, serving as the principal scientific advisor to the Coast Guard for oil and hazmat spill response and planning in the coastal zone. She has been lead SSC on several major responses, including the Texas City Y oil spill response (2014), the Morgan's Point Collision hazmat spill response (2015), the Green Canyon 248 offshore oil spill response (2016), and Hurricane Harvey (2017) as well as dozens of smaller oil and hazmat responses. She works on science and preparedness issues at the Coast Guard unit, Area Committee (AC), and Regional Response Team (RRT) levels and serves as an instructor for NOAA's Science of Oil Spills (SOS), and Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) classes. Dr. Doelling came to the SSC position with a strong background in ecotoxicology, protected resources, and interagency coordination. In her previous position at National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), she worked on Endangered Species Act (ESA) Section 7 consultations with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on pesticides and water quality issues, and spent a year at NOAA Headquarters as a Fishery Policy Advisor, working on national-level fisheries policy issues. She has worked for several Federal agencies, including EPA, where she wrote ecological risk assessments for pesticides; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) Chesapeake Bay Field Office, where she did stream assessment and restoration, and worked on a range of contaminant issues. Her dissertation focused on the trophic transfer of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an estuarine food web. She served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force, providing imagery and targeting support to U.S. troops during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm, reaching the rank of Captain (O-3). Paige later spent several years as a defense consultant working with imagery-based products and information. She holds a PhD in Environmental Science and Public Policy, an MA in International Transactions, a BS in Biochemistry, and a First-Degree Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. When not at work, she is likely to be found at the yoga studio, or outside hiking with a black Labrador. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000UMrjHMATw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-02T18:43:53Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 7 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-02T18:43:53Z )
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
Lunch in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnBtEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T17:15:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T12:15:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T13:30:00 [name] => Lunch in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-06-05T16:37:48Z )
12:30 pm - 1:00 am
Exhibitor Showcase Theater: Remove, Separate & Recover 100% of Pollution - presented by Surf Cleaner
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016rqNgEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T17:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T06:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T12:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T01:00:00 [name] => Exhibitor Showcase Theater: Remove, Separate & Recover 100% of Pollution - presented by Surf Cleaner [room] => Agency Pavilion & Exhibitor Showcase (Booth #152) [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b000016RuKnEAK [name] => Track: Exhibitor Showcase Theater ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-09T16:54:13Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
2C: Mexico Response Planning
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560LWEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T15:00:00 [name] => 2C: Mexico Response Planning [room] => 262 [notes] => ADD Mexico Ops Update, Dave Pertuz, AMEXHI, Lesson Learned, TBD Operator, Perdido North, Lessons Learned, Operator TBD, Curela Salinas South [abstract] =>

In this session the speakers will provide an update on drilling operations in Mexico, and lessons learned from their own operational preparedness. They will also discuss identified and potential challenges and concerns.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcjqEAA [contactid] => 003C000001I6YpDIAV [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bob Patterson [salutation] => [firstname] => Bob [lastname] => Patterson [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => Witt O'Brien's [bio] => Bob is Managing Director at Witt O'Brien's and oversees the 225+ PetroChem response management and consulting relationships for Witt O'Brien's. Bob has 35 years' experience in risk management and operations best practices for the Oil & Gas, manufacturing and financial industries. His experience involves Crisis Management, Incident management, and Emergency Response. During his tenure at Witt O'Brien's, Bob has facilitated, coached or participated in over 500 incidents, exercises and/or training sessions for his PetroChem clients. Bob has a BS in Business from Bryant College, and an MBA in Business from The University of Georgia. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001NnhMfMAJw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jckKEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001nfUALIA2 [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => David Pertuz [salutation] => [firstname] => David [lastname] => Pertuz [title] => Sr. Emergency Response Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Shell Exploration & Production Company [bio] => David Pertuz is a Sr. Emergency Response Specialist for Shell Oil Company. His are of emphasis is Emergency Response preparedness in Latin America, currently serving as leader of Emergency Response coordination efforts of the Colombian Petroleum Association (ACP) and the Mexican Association of Oil Companies (AMEXHI) Emergency Response Task Force. David has more than 30 years of experience in the maritime industry and hydrocarbons, joining Shell in 2012, previous experience include service as a Marine Safety Officer with the U.S. Coast Guard, and as Senior Consultant of Risk Management for the Energy Industry with Det Norske Veritas (DNV). During his service with the U.S. Coast Guard, David was the leader coordinator of the binational spill response between Mexico and the United States (MEXUS Plan) for the Gulf of Mexico. His areas of expertise include assessment of risks, preparation and response to emergencies and oil spills in the marine environment, and binational plans operations. David is also an Incident Command System instructor, and served as instructor of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) level 2 Spill control courses. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001AFMMkMAPw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lbljMAA [contactid] => 003C000002RW9l5IAD [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Planning and Preparedness in Mexico - A Collaborative Approach [abstract] => Planning for response has challenges. Ensuring all eventualities are considered and planned for takes time, experience and collaboration. Oil exploration will always have unknown factors - potential reservoir properties, drilling locations, seasons and equipment. Planning for oil spill scenarios therefore requires dependence on existing industry good practice and well-defined procedures. This presentation covers all aspects of contingency planning for a Mexican exploration drilling campaign and the potential areas that could be completed through collaboration. Oil spill modelling and oil spill sensitivity mapping allows planners to prioritize potentially oiled areas and consider tiered provision of resources. Operating companies could collaborate with OSRO's to share the development and visualization of this information in their plans. Equipment sharing between operators is another area where collaboration in industry can bring benefits, allowing operators to increase their tiered capacity. Understanding equipment availability, condition and response-readiness is crucial for an operator and could be collaborative between operators. If operators are using the same supply base and contractors, they will have similarities in their emergency response approach. Responding to a large incident offshore, will require the mobilization of many vessels. If there are shortfalls in the number of suitable vessels for response, then through collaboration, industry operators in Mexico will have more power to resolve the issue. The planning process includes a response technique assessment to understand which options will have the greatest overall environmental benefit. As good practice, operators should be considering which response techniques are feasible, realistic and within regulatory boundaries. Recently, industry has released the Spill Impact Mitigation Assessment (SIMA) guidance. SIMA is best done in collaboration with appropriate stakeholders. This includes regulatory agencies, state/municipal organisations and interested parties. If operators are following similar approaches, then there are synergies for collaboration. Whilst there are many companies operating in Mexico, it takes a different type of organisation to see the bigger picture of the synergies and try to encourage operators, companies and regulators to work together. Through our involvement in projects in Mexico, we have seen the challenges, constraints and opportunities for operators, whether on an individual or joint project. To share knowledge and experience in this community and open opportunities for discussion on the challenges and to see the bigger picture is something OSRL can do for the benefit of industry, operators and regulators in Mexico through our outreach program. [name] => Kirstin Taylor [salutation] => [firstname] => Kirstin [lastname] => Taylor [title] => Principal Consultant [suffix] => [company] => Oil Spill Response Limited [bio] => Kirstin is a Principal Consultant at OSRL with 10 years' experience in oil spill preparedness and response. She has responded to spills including working as a SCAT/Ops liaison during the Macondo incident in the Gulf of Mexico.  Experienced and competent in all aspects of oil spill contingency planning, Kirstin has delivered oil spill projects worldwide. Kirstin has recently written environmental risk assessments and oil spill response plans for a dual client project in Mexico. Kirstin holds degrees in Environmental Economics and Environmental Management (BSc) and Applied Physical Oceanography (MSc).  [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078s3vAAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-08T21:24:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABGfGEAX [contactid] => 003C000001nfUALIA2 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Mexico Operations Update - AMEXHI [abstract] => [name] => David Pertuz [salutation] => [firstname] => David [lastname] => Pertuz [title] => Sr. Emergency Response Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Shell Exploration & Production Company [bio] => David Pertuz is a Sr. Emergency Response Specialist for Shell Oil Company. His are of emphasis is Emergency Response preparedness in Latin America, currently serving as leader of Emergency Response coordination efforts of the Colombian Petroleum Association (ACP) and the Mexican Association of Oil Companies (AMEXHI) Emergency Response Task Force. David has more than 30 years of experience in the maritime industry and hydrocarbons, joining Shell in 2012, previous experience include service as a Marine Safety Officer with the U.S. Coast Guard, and as Senior Consultant of Risk Management for the Energy Industry with Det Norske Veritas (DNV). During his service with the U.S. Coast Guard, David was the leader coordinator of the binational spill response between Mexico and the United States (MEXUS Plan) for the Gulf of Mexico. His areas of expertise include assessment of risks, preparation and response to emergencies and oil spills in the marine environment, and binational plans operations. David is also an Incident Command System instructor, and served as instructor of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) level 2 Spill control courses. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001AFMMkMAPw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABGfkEAH [contactid] => 003C000002G33EnIAJ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => Lessons Learned: Perdido Belt Exploration [abstract] => [name] => Luis R. Elizonda [salutation] => [firstname] => Luis [lastname] => Elizonda [title] => HSE Advisor [suffix] => [company] => BHP Billiton [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-09T19:49:19Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000027M5NmIAK [name] => Steve Jeffcote [firstname] => Steve [lastname] => Jeffcote [title] => Principal, CEM, and Oil Spill Response [company] => BHP Billiton ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABGfpEAH [contactid] => 003C000002OBzBrIAL [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => Lessons Learned: Cuenca Salinas Exploration [abstract] => [name] => Gil Martinez [salutation] => [firstname] => Gil [lastname] => Martinez [title] => Sr. Emergency Response Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Murphy Oil Company Ltd. [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-09T19:49:35Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-09T19:49:35Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
3C: Satellite Remote Sensing
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560OkEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T15:00:00 [name] => 3C: Satellite Remote Sensing [room] => 265 [notes] => Add Chauwin Hu, University S. Florida (presentation title?), Ian McDonald, Uiver S. Florida (presentation title?). Chris Dufore and Dave Palandro to invite [abstract] =>

This session will focus on satellite remote sensing technologies to aid in detecting and tracking oil spills and guiding response efforts.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6YEAW [name] => Track 3: Evolving Response Technologies ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgS7EAI [contactid] => 003C00000178xUOIAY [function] => Co-Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => John Gerken [salutation] => [firstname] => John [lastname] => Gerken [title] => Vice President Corporate Accounts and Specialty Analytical Services [suffix] => [company] => Pace Analytical [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgSREAY [contactid] => 003C000001hB6VeIAK [function] => Co-Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Christopher Dufore [salutation] => [firstname] => Christopher [lastname] => Dufore [title] => Oceanographer [suffix] => [company] => Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019laoSMAQ [contactid] => 003C00000246JotIAE [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => New Capabilities in Satellite Environmental Monitoring [abstract] => In Europe satellite remote sensing is used extensively by organisations such as the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) and Norwegian Clean Seas Association for Operating Companies (NOFO) to detect acute pollution from petroleum activity and shipping. KSAT has delivered its satellite-based oil spill detection service to the petroleum industry, through NOFO since 2005 and EMSA since 2007. From 2016, the frequency of the NOFO service has increased significantly. Operating companies on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) applied to the Norwegian Environment Agency for revision of the terms on remote sensing, and the use of satellites was selected as the primary tool for detecting possible oil spills from petroleum activities on the NCS. The technology has proven to be the most cost effective method for monitoring large areas of the sea, and all the assets on the NCS is now being monitored on a daily basis. Radar Satellite imagery can cover so large areas that several oil fields are covered in the same image, which leads to cost savings for the operators, particularly when they team up for the service under the collaborative umbrella that NOFO provides. The more intense satellite monitoring of larger areas, with high requirements for temporal coverage and near real-time service delivery, has emphasized the necessity of being able to continuously integrate and fully utilize all available relevant satellite missions in the service provisioning. The presentation will demonstrate how the integration of the new satellite missions has increased the service capabilities with regards to potential temporal and spatial satellite coverage. KSAT has been a partner in the Centre for Integrated Remote Sensing and Forecasting for Arctic Operations (CIRFA) since its start in 2014. One of the goals of the partnership has been to develop accurate remote sensing information retrieval methods for reliable oil slick detection and characterization, and to improve the modelling of oil slicks. Recent results of the CIRFA research on Earth Observation methodologies and algorithms for oil slick characterization, demonstrated on the annual "Oil on Water" exercise in Norway, will also be presented. [name] => Andreas Hay Kaljord M.Sc. [salutation] => [firstname] => Andreas Hay [lastname] => Kaljord [title] => International Sales Manager [suffix] => M.Sc. [company] => Kongsberg Satellite Services [bio] => Andreas Hay Kaljord has been working as a Project Manager and International Sales Manager at KSAT since 2013. His main focus has been on operational deliveries and development of satellite based services such as vessel detection, oil spill detection and ice monitoring. With a background in applied physics and more than 15 years' experience from project management and software development, he also has extensive experience in application development for Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery (SAR). He has been involved in a variety of projects utilising satellite imagery for environmental monitoring, and has significant knowledge and experience of the capabilities and limitations of operational use of satellite imagery. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078Q92AAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T13:45:26Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019ld7kMAA [contactid] => 003C000001YsrojIAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Oil Slick Characterization using RADARSAT Constellation Mission Simulated Data [abstract] => The forthcoming RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) will have Compact Polarimetry (CP) modes. A key advantage of CP is that these modes provide more polarimetric information than dual-polarized RADARSAT-2 with no reduction in swath width. Analysis of simulated RCM SC50 (50 m resolution) and LNSC (100 m resolution) modes of an oil slick off the coast of Louisiana indicated there was good visual discrimination between the slick and the ocean. The visual discrimination was attributed to the ~ 6 dB difference between oil and ocean for RH backscatter. Not surprising, as the resolution went from 10 m to 50 m and then 100 m, the ocean-oil boundary became progressively less well-defined. From an oil slick detection perspective, however, the impact of the resolution may not be too significant if the spatial extent of the oil slick was roughly 5 to 10 times the resolution, where the 5 to 10 was based on operational experience. Further, the use of the 50 m SC50 mode versus the 100 m resolution LNSC mode may be a better choice for slick detection, unless there is a need to extract polarimetric information from the -25 dB NESZ LNSC versus the - 22 dB NESZ SC50. The Degree of Polarization (DoP) for both SC50 and LNSC was similar to the DoP calculated from the RADARSAT-2 quad polarized image, thus suggesting that oil slick characterization, specifically the discrimination of sheen and emulsion might be possible with CP imagery. Future work will focus on investigation of other CP parameters that might be suitable for ocean-slick discrimination and oil slick characterization. Following the mid 2019 launch of the RADARSAT Constellation Mission satellites, the plan is to acquire data over the Louisiana study site with the aim to validate the performance of the SC50 and LNSC modes [name] => Gordon Staples [salutation] => [firstname] => Gordon [lastname] => Staples [title] => Senior Staff Scientist, R&D [suffix] => [company] => MDA [bio] => Gordon Staples received the M.Sc. degree in ocean physics and the B.Sc. degree in honours physics and oceanography from the University of British Columbia. He joined MDA in 1993 and is currently Senior Scientist and Project Manager in the Earth Observations Systems division. In this role he oversees the geospatial services group, manages research projects, develops and delivers radar training, and provides scientific expertise for business development. He has extensive experience in radar polarimetry and the development of maritime and terrestrial radar applications. Gordon was the former President and is now Treasurer of the Canadian Remote Sensing Society. He is a member of the IEEE and the CRSS [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000kxrjDMAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-15T00:36:54Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RWI2OIAX [name] => Benjamin Deschanps [firstname] => Benjamin [lastname] => Deschanps [title] => Physical Scientist [company] => Canadian Ice Service, Meteorological Service of Canada ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABLXtEAP [contactid] => 0033b00002S4gvJAAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Satellite Detection of Marine Oil Using Multispectral Imagery and Synthetic Aperture Radar [abstract] => Within the NOAA Satellite and Information Service, Satellite Analysis Branch resides a 24x7 operational desk that monitors U.S. waters and their approaches for non-natural oil slicks by routinely analyzing high resolution multispectral imagery and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). For any anomaly believed to be the result of an accidental or intentional oil release, a Marine Pollution Surveillance Report (MPSR) product is created and published to the web. The monitoring service was formalized in 2011 stemming from a request submitted by NOAA's National Ocean Service, for satellite support during oil spill emergencies. Since then, the stakeholder base has expanded to government partners in DHS, DOI, EPA, and State agencies. As of March 2018 the analyses are published in real time to a webpage for the public to access. The mission of NOAA's oil spill surveillance desk is twofold; 1. Proactively surveil for accidental and intentional oil releases that might have otherwise gone undetected or unreported (i.e. pipeline leaks, equipment failures, bilge discharges) and 2. Provide information on an oil slick location, extent, and relative thickness during a major oil spill incident. The oil assessments are mainly derived through the availability of publicly funded environmental data, along with a small fraction of commercial scenes. The advantage of optical imagery is the ability to generate wavelength combinations that help distinguish oil from vegetation and other false positives. Disadvantages include being limited to daylight hours and cloud free weather conditions. The advantage of SAR imagery is that it allows for the detection of oil overnight and through clouds. Disadvantages include difficulty in positively identifying the substance as oil rather than vegetation or other false positives. Satellite based oil detection is not a new capability, but it is one that's becoming more widely relied upon throughout public and private industry. Not only can it be used to aid in the response's containment and cleanup strategies, satellite information can also support the natural resource damage assessments. Requests for international support are approved when routed through NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration. [name] => Ellen Ramirez [salutation] => [firstname] => Ellen [lastname] => Ramirez [title] => Physical Scientist, Oil Spill Monitoring Operations Lead [suffix] => [company] => NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078Tx0AAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-14T16:28:02Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-15T00:36:54Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
5C: Deepwater Horizon Restoration
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560OVEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T15:00:00 [name] => 5C: Deepwater Horizon Restoration [room] => 266 [notes] => ADD Overview of Status of BP NRDA & Restoration Funding (need find FEO speaker); make sure to include non-vendors to balance session [abstract] =>

Nine years after the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, restoration is being implemented in the impacted states, as agreed to, as per the Restore Act and Natural Resource Damage Assessment settlements.  This session will include a review of example DWH restoration in regards to topics including; shoreline loss, salt marsh and other habitat recovery, and other restoration aspects.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6QEAW [name] => Track 5: Response/Restoration ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgHxEAI [contactid] => 003C000001p8lXwIAI [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Lawrence Malizzi [salutation] => [firstname] => Lawrence [lastname] => Malizzi [title] => Senior Manager [suffix] => [company] => OBG Part of Ramboll [bio] => Mr. Malizzi has 29 years of experience in business development, litigation support, spill planning, drills, and response, Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), endangered species, and habitat restoration. Currently, he is managing work on the Bayport Channel Collision. Recently, he was a SCAT Team Lead on the Dublin Express response and he managed the OBG staff on the ITC Fire response, Hurricane's Florence, and Michael responses. Previously, he managed the OBG staff on the Bay Long response in Grand Isle, LA, the Avian Influenza response in Iowa, and was a SCAT Team Lead on the Bayonne 2015 spill response in Bayonne, NJ. Mr. Malizzi also managed staff on the Exxon Mayflower, Hurricane Isaac, Superstorm Sandy, Boston 30, and Texas City "Y" responses. He served as the Program Manager for the Natural Resource Advisor Program, among other tasks, in support of the MC252 Deepwater Horizon Response (BP Spill) in the Gulf of Mexico. Mr. Malizzi has been on the Board Secretary for the Spill Control Association of America, is on the Clean Gulf Planning Committee, and is on the Planning Committee for the International Oil Spill Conference 2020. He has spoken extensively on spill planning, NRDA, and response and other environmental topics in both the U.S., Canada, Middle East, and EU. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000kyYdlMAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgICEAY [contactid] => 003C000001GyNsZIAV [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Lyle Trumbull Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Lyle [lastname] => Trumbull [title] => Manager [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => OBG Part of Ramboll [bio] => Dr. Trumbull is the Senior Technical Director of Emergency Response for OBG and a biologist with 32 years of experience in academics, government, industry, and consulting. As a consultant, his work focuses on emergency response, environmental planning, and the impacts of oil and hazardous chemicals on human health and the environment. He has participated in the Environmental Unit for over 30 spill drills and/or events. He received a USCG Meritorious Team Commendation in 2005 for his role as Environmental Unit Leader during the Athos response. During the MC 252 response he led the real-time development of the Geographic Response Plans for Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida and was also responsible for the development and management of the NRA program. Prior to coming to OBG, Lyle worked as a Biologist for Shell Global Solutions and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000011eBUlMAMw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcO8MAI [contactid] => 003C0000027M5ZMIA0 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Vegetation Planting after Shoreline Cleanup Treatment Improves Salt Marsh Recovery Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill [abstract] => The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010) resulted in heavy oiling that impacted salt marsh vegetation and required intensive shoreline cleanup treatments. Oiling conditions and vegetation recovery were compared among reference plots and three types of heavily oiled plots over 2013-2015: oiled control plots (no cleanup treatment); mechanical cleanup treatment plots; and mechanical treatment plots coupled with vegetation planting (Spartina alterniflora). Mechanical treatment with planting showed the most improvement in oiling conditions and was effective in re-establishing vegetation cover and dominant plant species composition similar to reference conditions, and also reduced shoreline erosion. In contrast, the oiled controls and mechanical treatment plots without planting were similar to each other and showed poor vegetation recovery. Vegetation planting should be considered as a spill response or emergency restoration option for heavily oiled salt marshes, especially where intensive treatments are used, impacted areas are left largely unvegetated, or marsh shorelines are at risk of erosion. Opportunities and methods for marsh vegetation planting following oil spills will be discussed. [name] => Scott Zengel [salutation] => [firstname] => Scott [lastname] => Zengel [title] => Vice President [suffix] => [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) [bio] => Dr. Scott Zengel is a Vice President and Senior Scientist with Research Planning, Inc. (RPI), based in Tallahassee, Florida. He has been a member of NOAA's Scientific Support Team for over 15 years and often serves as a shoreline cleanup assessment coordinator during oil spill response. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001KCFzsMAHw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T19:40:42Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RWCXnIAP [name] => Nicolle Rutherford [firstname] => Nicolle [lastname] => Rutherford [title] => Biologist [company] => Emergency Response Division, Office of Response and Restoration, NOAA ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001hSv7VIAS [name] => Jacqui Michel [firstname] => Jacqui [lastname] => Michel [title] => President [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcOhMAI [contactid] => 003C000001PWPsrIAH [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => A Review of Gulf of Mexico Shoreline Erosion Studies following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Comparison to 4 Years of Shoreline Loss Data from 2011-2015 [abstract] => The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill affected approximately 1000 km of Louisiana shoreline at varying levels, nearly 800 km of which was coastal marsh. Long-term shoreline loss in the northern Gulf of Mexico is an important question with far-reaching ecological and human-use implications. DWH oil has been demonstrated to have negative impacts on marsh vegetation and biological communities. Numerous published studies have examined the potential for exacerbated marsh shoreline retreat after the DWH accident using a variety of ground-based sampling and aerial/satellite imagery interpretation. While previous DWH studies of shoreline loss indicate some oil-induced erosion may have occurred, the data do not support conclusions of long-term, large-scale, and potentially cascading ecosystem loss as posited in some studies. This paper reviews previous DWH erosion studies, discusses their limitations and provides a more comprehensive analysis of a larger sample data set. The data from multiple NRDA studies were combined for 164 herbaceous marsh sample sites with complete data throughout the study period (2010-2015). The data showed significant differences in the overall mean rate of erosion for all sample sites between the time periods of Fall 2010 - Fall 2011 and Fall 2011 - Fall 2013, indicating 2011 was a higher than typical erosion year for oiled and unoiled shorelines. There were no significant differences in the rate of erosion in any oiling category for the periods. Of the oiled shoreline within Louisiana, approximately 150 km were Heavy oiled herbaceous marsh. This represents less than 3% of the shorelines surveyed by SCAT for potential oil and a much smaller percentage of marsh shorelines in Louisiana overall. The data in this study indicate the Heavy and Very Heavy oiled shorelines eroded 0.4-1.4m/year more than unoiled habitats for a short period, with no long- term significant differences in shoreline loss beyond 2 years. [name] => Greg Challenger [salutation] => [firstname] => Greg [lastname] => Challenger [title] => President/Marine Scientist [suffix] => [company] => Polaris Applied Sciences [bio] => Greg Challenger M.S. President / Marine Scientist / Professional Wetland Scientist Polaris Applied Sciences Mr. Challenger is President of Polaris Applied Sciences, Inc.(Polaris) and a marine scientist with over 30 years of experience in natural resource management, oil and chemical spill damage assessment and scientific support of maritime casualties. Mr. Challenger has responded to over 150 oil and chemical spills, spills of Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS) and vessel groundings in sensitive marine habitats worldwide. Her served as a technical adviser for the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) program and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) for the DWH oil spill from 2010 to 2015. The assessment of the publicly available data presented was completed with funding from Polaris and the data analyses and interpretation expressed are those of the authors alone. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078ciJAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-12T22:29:25Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001zuGetIAE [name] => Stephan Gmur [firstname] => Stephan [lastname] => Gmur [title] => Environmental Scientist [company] => Polaris Applied Sciences ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001YsramIAB [name] => Elliott Taylor [firstname] => Elliott [lastname] => Taylor [title] => Principal & Sr. Scientist [company] => Polaris Applied Sciences ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-12T22:29:25Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
6C: Exercise Evaluation - Maximizing Value
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560Q2EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T15:00:00 [name] => 6C: Exercise Evaluation - Maximizing Value [room] => 267 [notes] => Add - Exercise Evaluation Qualifications, LInda Manka, Shell (Ron Cantin to invite), Identifying Areas for Improvement & Their Root Causes , Ron Cantin, Evaluation guidelines and tools, Cullen Jones or Sarah Moore, BSEE proposed (Sams or Cantin to invite), From Lessons to Action - Improvement Planning, TBD (Sams or Cantin to invite) [abstract] =>

This session seeks to explore key aspects of exercise evaluation, and its importance to truly improving response capability.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6iEAG [name] => Track 6: Training and Exercise Best Management Practices ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jiASEAY [contactid] => 00380000012ipzPAAQ [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Michael Sams [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Sams [title] => Incident Management and Preparedness Advisor [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard 8th District [bio] => In June 2012, Michael Sams became the inaugural Incident Management & Preparedness Advisor for the Eighth Coast Guard District located in New Orleans, LA. Mr. Sams serves as the District's lead expert on Coast Guard operations and connectivity under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and the National Response Framework (NRF). He serves as the link between the District and the regional intergovernmental response community, as a deployable response resource coordinator, and as a technical advisor to the District Commander. Mr. Sams is responsible for integrating Coast Guard plans with the regional intergovernmental operating plans. He is also responsible for ensuring that the preparedness cycle of planning, training, exercising, evaluating, and revising is continually implemented. Mr. Sams serves as the Co-Chair of the Region 6, 7, and 8 Regional Response Teams, and is the Regional Chair for Mexico/United States Joint Response Team. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078y6KAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T15:03:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEWb3EAH [contactid] => 003C00000246JCvIAM [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Exercise Evaluation Qualifications [abstract] => [name] => Linda Manka [salutation] => [firstname] => Linda [lastname] => Manka [title] => Manager, Emergency Response [suffix] => [company] => Shell [bio] => Linda Manka, CRSP, ABCP - Emergency Response Manager; UPX, UPU, IG & DS Canada Program Manager; SART - Shell Americas Response Team Linda joined Shell in 2009 and currently works as the Emergency Response Manager for Unconventionals in North/South America, Integrated Gas assets in Trinidad and Bolivia, Downstream Canada, Americas Offshore Exploration and as Shell's Emergency Management's global focal for Source Control. Linda is also a member of Shell's Global Response Support Network supporting them as a qualified Incident Commander and leading Shell's ICS Skill Pool for Liaison. She has served as a Shell Incident Commander during natural disasters in Canada and as a Liaison Officer representing the Oil & Gas Industry in Government Emergency Operations Centers for multiple wildfires in Canada. During her time in this role, Linda has evolved the role to focus on industry-leading and global Emergency Response Program best practices. Linda began her career in emergency response more than 25 years ago in Alaska at an oil spill cooperative (pre and post Exxon Valdez and OPA 90) providing emergency preparedness support and responding to incidents from offshore platforms, tankers, barges, onshore processing facilities, refineries and rail transports. In 2000 Linda moved from Alaska to Calgary where she worked for Petro Canada (now Suncor) as the project manager to create an oil spill cooperative for drilling programs in advance of a major pipeline proposal in the Canada's Arctic, and was the Global Emergency Management focal to develop training and exercise programs for emergency preparedness and response as well as Crisis Management and Business Continuity for oil and gas operations. Linda's passion for emergency preparedness and response continues today through her ongoing efforts to educate responders, Incident Command Teams, industry and stakeholders by increasing awareness, competencies and overall preparedness. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-15T01:44:18Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEWaoEAH [contactid] => 0038000000rRekwAAC [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Identifying Areas for Improvement and Their Root Causes [abstract] => [name] => Ron Cantin [salutation] => [firstname] => Ron [lastname] => Cantin [title] => President [suffix] => [company] => EMSI [bio] => Ron Cantin is the President of Emergency Management Services International, Inc. (EMSI). Ron is a 27 year Coast Guard veteran who has over 25 years experience in major incident and event management, and served two tours of duty as a senior member of the Coast Guard's National Strike Force. From 2005 - 2007, he served as the Commanding Officer of the Gulf Strike Team. He has extensive experience in a wide range of local, regional, and national level incidents including Deepwater Horizon oil spill, John F. Kennedy Jr. Search and Recovery, Capitol Hill Anthrax, Typhoons in the Western Pacific, numerous other natural disasters, major maritime incidents, oil spills, National Security Special Events, and chemical releases. Ron served as the Incident Specific Federal On Scene Coordinator and Incident Commander following the impact of hurricane Katrina, leading 2000+ responders in mitigating the effects of over 8 million gallons of spilled crude oil from nine simultaneous medium and major spills, and recovering tens of thousands of hazardous materials containers from the highly environmentally sensitive areas of coastal Louisiana. Ron has taught ICS around the world and has coached thousands of personnel on response teams in carrying out their ICS responsibilities during incidents and exercises, and advised the Unified Commands at ICP Mobile, ICP Houma, as well as the Area Command during the Deepwater Horizon response. He has served as Incident Commander on both of the Coast Guard's (Pacific Area and Atlantic Area) Incident Management Assist Teams (IMAT), and holds certifications for numerous Type I, and Type II ICS positions. He is the first person in the history of the Coast Guard to certify as a Type I Incident Commander. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-08T00:18:46Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEWaAEAX [contactid] => 003C000002OByyHIAT [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Evaluation Guidelines and Tools [abstract] => [name] => Sara Moore [salutation] => [firstname] => Sara [lastname] => Moore [title] => Acting Gulf Oil Spill Preparedness Section Supervisor [suffix] => [company] => BSEE Oil Spill Preparedness Division [bio] => Sara Moore is the newly appointed Gulf Oil Spill Preparedness Section Supervisor for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Oil Spill Preparedness Division (OSPD), which oversees oil spill planning and preparedness for oil and gas exploration, development, and production facilities in both state and federal offshore waters of the U.S. Through both office and field verification activities, the goal of OSPD is to evaluate, test, and help advance the preparedness posture of the offshore spill response community. Prior to this appointment, Sara worked in the private sector as a consultant and regulatory compliance specialist, and most recently as a Senior Analyst within BSEE OSPD. She has experience in a wide variety of industries, with focus in the areas of water resources, remediation and restoration, regulatory compliance, and policy development, among others. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078x0kAAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-10T18:53:25Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABFmuEAH [contactid] => 00380000012ipzzAAA [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => From Lessons to Action - Improvement Planning [abstract] => [name] => Craig Wyatt [salutation] => [firstname] => Craig [lastname] => Wyatt [title] => Manager, Emergency Response [suffix] => [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company [bio] => Craig Wyatt is the Manager of Emergency Preparedness and Response for Colonial Pipeline Company. Craig joined the Colonial Team in 2017 and along with the ER Team, has the responsibility to ensure the company is prepared to manage emergency incidents with potential impacts to people, the environment and company operations through a comprehensive preparedness, training and exercise program. Prior to joining the Colonial Team, Craig served the oil and gas industry as a Senior Emergency Management Consultant providing emergency preparedness services to assist clients manage company preparedness programs worldwide. Craig also stood along side clients in support of emergency response incidents providing response expertise/coaching, filling critical IMT positions and managing responding organization relationships. As a veteran of the United States Coast Guard, Craig served a 27 year career developing subject matter expertise in emergency management and disaster preparedness. He gained extensive response experience in managing oil and hazardous chemical spills, vessel collisions/groundings, and business continuity events in seven major ports across the United States. He has filled multiple roles in many national level events including natural disasters, major oil/hazardous chemical spills , political conventions, and sporting events. Craig earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Thomas Edison State University and holds certifications from the United States Coast Guard, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the Federal Aviation Administration. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077XZ5AAMw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-08T22:09:15Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-15T01:44:18Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
7C: Real-Time Response - Using Technology to Enhance Readiness and Initial Response
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560YmEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T15:00:00 [name] => 7C: Real-Time Response - Using Technology to Enhance Readiness and Initial Response [room] => 268 [notes] => Pending legal approval from Colonial to put themselves out there like Jon Wickersham is proposing. Here's his tentative session description - put he has to confirm the people who he hasn't talked to yet: This session will simulate a real-time spill scenario and demonstrate tools and technology that can be used to improve Initial Response. From enhanced situational awareness to resource management and protection of sensitive/critical areas; we will demonstrate the use of GIS, phones, tablets, applications and drones to drive better and SAFER decision making during the Initial Response phase. We will have an actual deployment (people, not equipment) to real, previously classified, recovery points and protection locations (Drinking Water Intakes) and demonstrate the use of sending imagery/videos to build a Virtual Common Operating Picture (VCOP) and/or project to an actual COP if an Incident Command Post has been established. Additionally, a real-time demonstration of tethered drones will be displayed along with a discussion on the integration of real-time live video and technology to enhance Proactive Phase planning cycles. This session is intended to demonstrate, in real-time, how one operator uses these tools to build their initial response and set the framework for better management of ongoing operations in a Proactive Response. [abstract] =>

This session will simulate a real-time spill scenario and demonstrate tools and technology that can be used to improve Initial Response. From enhanced situational awareness to resource management and protection of sensitive/critical areas; we will demonstrate the use of GIS, phones, tablets, applications and drones to drive better and SAFER decision making during the Initial Response phase. We will have an actual deployment (people, not equipment) to real, previously classified, recovery points and protection locations (Drinking Water Intakes) and demonstrate the use of sending imagery/videos to build a Virtual Common Operating Picture (VCOP) and/or project to an actual COP if an Incident Command Post has been established. Additionally, a real-time demonstration of tethered drones will be displayed along with a discussion on the integration of real-time live video and technology to enhance Proactive Phase planning cycles. This session is intended to demonstrate, in real-time, how one operator uses these tools to build their initial response and set the framework for better management of ongoing operations in a Proactive Response. OSRO field support provided by AMPOL

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6OEAW [name] => Track 7: Inland Preparedness and Response ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABb3MEAT [contactid] => 003C0000018NXWXIA4 [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Jon Wickersham [salutation] => [firstname] => Jon [lastname] => Wickersham [title] => ER Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company [bio] => Jon Wickersham - Colonial Pipeline Company Emergency Response Program Specialist Jon Wickersham serves as an Emergency Response Program Specialist for Colonial Pipeline Company, the largest refined pipeline system in the U.S. In his role, he is responsible for developing integrated contingency preparedness and planning solutions to effectively prepare for, mobilize and respond to incidents. His primary areas of focus are risk management, initial response prioritization, and operational readiness & competence. Jon works with Colonial employees, regulators, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), state and local first responders and communities to ensure all entities are prepared for an incident response. This includes coordinating training exercises, drill events, and ongoing education and awareness programs; which includes an enhanced planning approach Jon developed for field validating and classifying nearly 5,000 recovery points along the Colonial pipeline system. Prior to joining Colonial in 2015, Jon worked in the operational spill response industry for over 20 years. Throughout his tenure in the industry, he has been involved in response efforts for major petroleum, natural disaster incidents affecting the Midwest, eastern and gulf coasts of the United States. Jon is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and a holds a bachelor's degree in Management and Information Systems from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001FfYdHMAVw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mEytEAE [contactid] => 00380000012ipzzAAA [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => An Operator's Perspective: In-House Tools and UAS for Initial Response [abstract] => [name] => Craig Wyatt [salutation] => [firstname] => Craig [lastname] => Wyatt [title] => Manager, Emergency Response [suffix] => [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company [bio] => Craig Wyatt is the Manager of Emergency Preparedness and Response for Colonial Pipeline Company. Craig joined the Colonial Team in 2017 and along with the ER Team, has the responsibility to ensure the company is prepared to manage emergency incidents with potential impacts to people, the environment and company operations through a comprehensive preparedness, training and exercise program. Prior to joining the Colonial Team, Craig served the oil and gas industry as a Senior Emergency Management Consultant providing emergency preparedness services to assist clients manage company preparedness programs worldwide. Craig also stood along side clients in support of emergency response incidents providing response expertise/coaching, filling critical IMT positions and managing responding organization relationships. As a veteran of the United States Coast Guard, Craig served a 27 year career developing subject matter expertise in emergency management and disaster preparedness. He gained extensive response experience in managing oil and hazardous chemical spills, vessel collisions/groundings, and business continuity events in seven major ports across the United States. He has filled multiple roles in many national level events including natural disasters, major oil/hazardous chemical spills , political conventions, and sporting events. Craig earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Thomas Edison State University and holds certifications from the United States Coast Guard, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the Federal Aviation Administration. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077XZ5AAMw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-30T19:57:01Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000018NXWXIA4 [name] => Jon Wickersham [firstname] => Jon [lastname] => Wickersham [title] => ER Specialist [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 0033b00002S5YjmAAF [name] => Brandon Klopfenstein [firstname] => Brandon [lastname] => Klopfenstein [title] => Emergency Response Program Specialist [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company ) [2] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001MF34gIAD [name] => Philip J. Lyons [firstname] => Philip [lastname] => Lyons [title] => Sales [company] => AMPOL American Pollution Control, Corp. ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-09-30T19:57:01Z )
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnByEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T20:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T20:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T15:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T15:30:00 [name] => Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-06-05T16:38:35Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
2D: Risk-Based Management Practices Used in Response Planning and Incident Prevention
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560M5EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T17:00:00 [name] => 2D: Risk-Based Management Practices Used in Response Planning and Incident Prevention [room] => 262 [notes] => 4 speakers max - Add either BHP (Jennifer Crouch) or Anadarko (Mike Drieu). Currently have 2 revised titles set to Mike for approval. Matched up the titles with the session description provided. [abstract] =>

This session will demonstrate how industry has applied risk-based decision making for preventing incidents. Risk-based decision making started in the late 1990’s to help the shipping industry to decrease the number of incidents, including oil spills and personnel safety accidents. Over the years, risk-based decision making has evolved to include the offshore oil and gas industry. Speakers in this session will cover different risk-based planning tools by using examples that show how they have helped improve safety and decrease environmental incidents.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jeUVEAY [contactid] => 003C000001MF2oRIAT [function] => Co-Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Mike Drieu [salutation] => [firstname] => Mike [lastname] => Drieu [title] => HSE Advisor [suffix] => [company] => Occidental Petroleum [bio] => Michael Drieu is EHS Advisor for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation for technical and management expertise concerning subsea source control key resources, procedures, preparedness, planning and response Technical resource for clarification to regulations, expectations, incident response and management plans and processes. The job also includes in a thorough understanding of the industry Source Control equipment such as general operability and capability. Mike was previously Manager, Response Preparedness - WellCONTAINED for Wild Well Control, Inc., a Houston, Texas based company specializing in worldwide firefighting, well control and related engineering, marine engineering and training services. Expanded position to include subsea well control procedures and exercises, and assisting managing subsea containment equipment for 16 oil and gas operators At Wild Well, Michael has also served as a Project Manager for GOM platform recovery work including costs estimates, asset acquisitions, onshore and offshore project planning, development and implementation of recovery procedures for oil and gas production platforms. He also serves as Incident Commander for WWCI's Spill Management Team. Michael received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from U.S. Coast Guard Academy on 1984 Since April 2010, Mike has played an active role working at Source Control Command Post during the DW Horizon Oil Spill supporting Intervention, Containment and SIMOPS activities. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-09T21:13:08Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jeUkEAI [contactid] => 003C000001iHnCRIA0 [function] => Co-Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Jennifer Crouch [salutation] => [firstname] => Jennifer [lastname] => Crouch [title] => Principal CEM & Security - GOM [suffix] => [company] => BHP Billiton [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lU8EMAU [contactid] => 003C000001zuh9fIAA [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => "An Ounce of Prevention..." Failure Assessment, Risk Ranking, and Mitigation as a Strategy for Minimizing Incident Frequency [abstract] => A Geographic Response Plan (GRP) identifies sensitive natural, cultural, or significant economic resources at risk of injury from an incident and then describes and prioritizes response strategies to reduce injury to the identified resources at risk from that incident. These GRPs are developed, in part, because pipelines, train tracks, or other critical infrastructure have inherent failure risks. However, incident prevention is much more cost effective than incident response. Assessing and mitigating the failure risk of vulnerable assets prior to an incident is a valuable tool to operators to prioritize spending of limited operation and maintenance funds and thereby reducing the likelihood of needing to respond and implement the GRP. Many oil and gas pipelines, train tracks, bridges, and other critical infrastructure traverse unstable landscapes such as waterways, floodplains, and steep terrain. These landscapes often pose threats to stability and integrity as conditions change and are typically in sensitive areas listed in the GRP. A variety of approaches are available to better understand and predict the magnitude and frequency of natural forces that threaten pipeline and other infrastructure integrity. Risks of gas or hazardous liquid pipeline failures or train derailments from these threats are of high concern to the industry and the public, and the risks escalate significantly in high consequence areas. One approach to minimize risk is to prioritize vulnerable assets by assessing and ranking them through a combination of publicly available data, operator knowledge, and site-specific information (e.g., pipeline characteristics, recent survey data, etc.). The objective is to provide a risk ranking so that operators can focus on and systematically reduce their risk over time. This proactive approach can be utilized for infrastructure exposed to natural forces that are prone to potential failure and then also compare to areas of high environmental consequence highlighted in a GRP to further refine financial risks from incidents and thus focus recommended corrective actions on areas that have the highest potential cost savings. Examples of proactive management will be highlighted that have shown decreases in incident frequency. [name] => Josh Gravenmier [salutation] => [firstname] => Josh [lastname] => Gravenmier [title] => Incident Response and Recovery-Oil &Gas Market Sector Leader [suffix] => [company] => ARCADIS [bio] => Mr. Josh Gravenmier is a Vice President / Technical Expert at Arcadis and serves as the Oil and Gas Program Lead for the Arcadis Emergency Response and Recovery Service Team. He has worked as an environmental consultant for over 28 years and specializes in the oil and gas industry; sediment evaluation and dredging programs; brownfield redevelopment; as well as the focus of this talk: emergency prevention, planning, and response. Mr. Gravenmier has responded to a variety of incidents in a variety of settings and continually focuses on ways to prevent as well as train for and respond to incidents to minimize their impacts and return to normal operating conditions. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000vNdw0MACw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-09T21:21:39Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002NCQzeIAH [name] => Jeff Budzich [firstname] => Jeff [lastname] => Budzich [title] => Program Manager [company] => ARCADIS ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lbvhMAA [contactid] => 0038000000rReu2AAC [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Applying "Risk Assessment" Principles to Incident Mitigation Planning Illustrated by Multiple Spill Event Case Studies [abstract] => Regulatory requirements frequently primary focus on worst case incident planning with little regard for usual risk assessment for consequent and frequency analysis. This presentation will use 2 anonymous but very likely case studies to have interactive discussion and illustrate the value of risk-based mitigation planning to maximize the return on investment of planning, training and exercising to reduce the company exposure to incident consequence. Incident command can use a longer-term focus in the emergency phase to facilitate short cycle transition to a project by presenting project solutions early based on pre-planned mitigation's. Presenting stakeholders with a forward-looking approach to incident stabilization and restoration that is tied to existing emergency response organization demonstrates sustained commitment to mitigation of incident damage [name] => Kelly Wilson REM, CESCO [salutation] => [firstname] => Kelly [lastname] => Wilson [title] => Vice President [suffix] => REM, CESCO [company] => CTEH RM [bio] => Kelly Wilson brings more than 30 years of emergency management experience to CTEHRM. Throughout his career, he has responded to hundreds of international incidents, including responding to refinery HF acid fire, Incident Commander for the Agrifoss Fertilizer release, Deputy Incident Commander during Tennessee Valley Authority Ash Dam failure and serving as operations section chief during the Deepwater Horizon incident. Wilson previously served as manager of crisis and emergency management for Anadarko Petroleum Company's worldwide operations. He has also held senior leadership roles at national emergency management companies as Vessel Qualified Individual and response services for marine industries to domestic and international clientele. He served as an officer with the U.S. Coast Guard in Houston Texas and participated in the Phillips 66 explosion and many other spills and incidents. He served as the chairman of the Subcommittee on Oil Spill and Emergency Management for the American Petroleum Institute and as chairman of the 2017 International Oil Spill Conference. Kelly Wilson, REM, brings more than thirty years of Emergency Management knowledge to CTEH. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-18T19:01:17Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEUxbEAH [contactid] => 0033b00002RgRpdAAF [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Offshore Risk Based Planning for Dropped Object [abstract] => [name] => Jonathan Deegan [salutation] => [firstname] => Jonathan [lastname] => Deegan [title] => GOM HSE Risk Manager [suffix] => [company] => Occidental Petroleum [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-11T23:18:55Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEUdbEAH [contactid] => 0033b00002RgRilAAF [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Update of Worst-Case Discharge: Risk Based Discharge Work Group [abstract] => [name] => Evan Zimmerman [salutation] => [firstname] => Evan [lastname] => Zimmerman [title] => Executive Director [suffix] => [company] => The Offshore Operators Committee [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-09T21:22:18Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T23:18:55Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
3D: Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in Oil Spill Response and Monitoring
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560OpEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T17:00:00 [name] => 3D: Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in Oil Spill Response and Monitoring [room] => 265 [notes] => [abstract] =>

This session will examine evolving surveillance and visualization technologies to aid and improve oil spill response and monitoring. The use of various sensors will also be discussed.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6YEAW [name] => Track 3: Evolving Response Technologies ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgTKEAY [contactid] => 003C00000246JuwIAE [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Robin Paulos [salutation] => [firstname] => Robin [lastname] => Paulos [title] => Coastal Resources Scientist [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgTPEAY [contactid] => 003C0000018NXPPIA4 [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Andy Carlson [salutation] => [firstname] => Andy [lastname] => Carlson [title] => Finance Officer [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lb1qMAA [contactid] => 003C000002RW8LNIA1 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Applications During Oil Spills [abstract] => As technology improves, we can see the advancements in methods for collecting and managing field data immediately following oil spills and other coastal impacts. With the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's) and multispectral sensors we can acquire accurate assessments of impacted areas without the further distribution of chemicals, as commonly occurs with the use of traditional survey methods. Relationships developed with multispectral imaging sensors and plant health can help determine impacts, monitor marsh health and help mitigate areas that are impacted by contaminants in sensitive marsh areas. Traditional methods requiring airboat and human foot traffic methods, which can further spread contaminates into marsh areas. The use of UAV's can also reduce negative impacts to human health through exposure to spill contaminants. By using images captured both with true imaging sensors and multispectral images, we can evaluate plant health and establish impact lines in coastal areas. Vegetation is one of the primary indicators of marsh health, and with a multispectral sensor we can determine the areas of impact and help monitor recovery efforts in sensitive marsh habitats. In addition to marsh health, wildlife can be severally impacted by oil spills along the gulf coast. With the ability to fly a thermal camera over oil saturated areas we can quickly identify wildlife that may be covered in oil that may not be noticed in traditional visual inspections. UAV's are effectively becoming a valuable tool during these environmental hazards, not only for immediate information but also for long-term monitoring and mitigation. [name] => Coy LeBlanc [salutation] => [firstname] => Coy [lastname] => LeBlanc [title] => Environmental Field Specialist [suffix] => [company] => C. H. Fenstermaker & Associates, L.L.C. [bio] => Spent six years working on the Coastwide Reference Monitoring Stations (CRMS) in coastal Louisiana. From there my career moved into a field specialist roll with Fenstermaker where over the last 6+ years I have spent most of my time doing wetland delineations with our field team. Four semesters ago I started my path to a master's degree where I have been working on a thesis using multispectral imaging to estimate above aground biomass in a Sagittaria lancifolia marsh, this research has led my interest to other abilities of the advanced technology such as emergency responds, forestry counts and farming benefits. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078QIEAA2w500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-08T01:15:47Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lf3nMAA [contactid] => 003C0000026186fIAA [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Multispectral UAS System for Detecting, Characterizing, and Mapping Oil Spills on Near Shore Environments [abstract] => We have developed a UAS system that collects multispectral data in order to characterize oil slick thicknesses and emulsification ratios. This system consists on a UAS that carries multiple cameras that integrate 10 wavelength band sensors ranging from Ultra-Violet (UV) to Long Wave Infrared (LW-IR). This system has been originally tested at OHMSETT and at the MC-20 site in the Gulf of Mexico. More recently this UAS was put in operation during the Lake Washington Wellhead blowout in Louisiana. In here we present examples of how this operational tool allowed oil spill responders to efficiently deploy containments of the floating oil (booming) and to monitor the collection of the oil on real time. Moreover, using a rapid classification algorithm, the multispectral data collected by our UAS allowed us to make a detailed high resolution classification of the oil detected on the shorelines of the affected areas. The UAS also delivered near real time oil detection that were used during the spill by the NOAA oil spill science coordinators through the ERMA system. This UAS has proven its ability to detect oil on 'hard to reach areas' and it offers a valuable option for the evaluation of affected areas impacted by the spill. [name] => Oscar Garcia [salutation] => [firstname] => Oscar [lastname] => Garcia [title] => Director [suffix] => [company] => Water Mapping, LLC [bio] => Oscar Garcia is the Director of Water Mapping and an Adjunct Scientist at Florida State University. He is a Geosciencist graduated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Graduate Certificate Program, and from Texas A&M Corpus Christi where he obtained his PhD in Coastal and Marine Science. He specializes on Microwave Satellite Remote Sensing for oil spill detection and more recently on the utilization of multispectral UAS for mapping and characterization of oil spills. He is currently engaged with NASA, NOAA, BSEE, and EPA, on the development and implementation of satellite, UAVs and UAS technologies for detection of oil spills. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-13T15:15:12Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcaFMAQ [contactid] => 003C000002RWDpRIAX [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Contamination Assessment Survey Using Visible, Thermal and LiDAR [abstract] => This presentation will demonstrate how the combined use of Remote Aircraft-mounted visible light (RGB), Infrared (IR), and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technologies provides a much more powerful data collection methodology, than any single technology. The combination of these three technologies has been used for: -The detection of fugitive hydrocarbon sheens in a high-tide area -The generation of topographical maps of coastal zones to investigate areas of potential erosion and deposition -Subsurface investigations using IR sensors by locating groundwater seeps (cold) in tidal areas By utilizing multiple unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) technologies, extensive site data can be collected quickly and effectively. •​One-foot contour maps of coastal zones •​IR and RBG video of tidal areas during high tide •​IR photogrammetric maps/models of tidal flats during low tide •​High-resolution, georeferenced photogrammetric maps of the facilities and coastal zones •​IR reports with images and coordinates of potential groundwater seeps in tidal flats The presentation will show how these outputs can support concurrent subsurface investigations, monitor for fugitive hydrocarbon sheens, and provide baseline survey data to assess potential erosion and deposition. [name] => Zachary Powers [salutation] => [firstname] => Zachary [lastname] => Powers [title] => Remote Aircraft Specialist [suffix] => [company] => GHD [bio] => Zac has 8 years of experience collecting and analyzing data and integrating technology with scientific and engineering services. Zac's work experience with GHD includes emergency response, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) operations, environmental compliance, environmental remediation, industrial hygiene, and wetland assessments. Zac has performed various roles on projects, including project manager, project coordinator, site supervisor, site safety officer, and remote pilot. Zac developed and implemented the GHD UAS Program in 2017, holds the positions of US Coordinator of Remote Flight Operations, and has over 100 UAS flight hours. Zac has successfully integrated UAS technology into many of GHD's existing service lines to better serve client needs. In 2019, Zac joined GHD's Digital Region to further advance UAS technologies and innovations within the company. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078qZLAAYw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-08T13:35:22Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RWDpWIAX [name] => E. Daniel Carré [firstname] => E. Daniel [lastname] => Carré [title] => Associate [company] => GHD ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lbS3MAI [contactid] => 003C0000026Z4EXIA0 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Floating Oil Spill Detection and Autonomous Monitoring [abstract] => Infrared polarimetry for surface spill detection is an emerging sensing modality demonstrated to show significantly enhanced contrast in situations where conventional thermal imaging falls short. Polarimetric imagery leverages polarization signatures differences between surface slicks and water that are different from those that lead to thermal signatures. Imaging of the polarization response of oil and water in a scene can lead to enhanced detection, particularly when the spill materials in a scene are at thermal equilibrium. Previous testing at Ohmsett and other sites showed excellent performance of multiple types of crude oil, diesel, and kerosene in still water, in waves, during the day and overnight, and even showed strong detection of emulsified oil in waves. The sensing improvement offers the promise of automated detection of oil spills and leaks for routine monitoring and accidents with the added benefit of being able to continue monitoring at night. In this paper, we report on the current development of a robust automated oil detection system using infrared polarimetry. This includes analysis of various data sets, including data collected over the Summer and Fall months of 2019 at Ohmsett. This paper will discuss the system architecture and algorithm approach for detection along with its usefulness for automatically alerting. This paper will also discuss testing performed using an infrared polarimetric camera integrated into a fixed-wing UAV. The testing includes scenarios for oil response operations over water and pipeline inspections over land. The results from this UAV flight test will be analyzed and discussed to determine the effectiveness of infrared polarimetery for detection of oil for different situations. [name] => Justin Vaden [salutation] => [firstname] => Justin [lastname] => Vaden [title] => Senior Optical Engineer [suffix] => [company] => Polaris Sensors Technologies [bio] => Justin Vaden is a Senior Optical Engineer at Polaris Sensor Technologies where he has designed, developed, and tested a large number of custom optical systems over multiple wavebands for a variety customers and applications. Mr. Vaden serves as the lead for development and testing of the Pyxis thermal imaging polarimeter. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000011fgWSMAYw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-03T19:48:01Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000026Z4ESIA0 [name] => David Chenault [firstname] => David [lastname] => Chenault [title] => President [company] => Polaris Sensor Technologies ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-13T15:15:12Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
5D: Scientific Support Within the Environmental Unit for ESF Hurricane Response
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560MoEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T17:00:00 [name] => 5D: Scientific Support Within the Environmental Unit for ESF Hurricane Response [room] => 266 [notes] => What's the focus of this session? Is it scientific only? ADD Response & Scientific Support for Hurricanes ESF 10/3 - maybe 5? (Scott Zengel or Chris Boring) 3rd presentation? [abstract] =>

This is a “must attend session” for anyone wanting to better understand the many nuances and challenges that face state and federal entities after a major hurricane landfall. This session will highlight often overlooked, but significantly important, aspects of the ESF-10 pollution mitigation mission.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6QEAW [name] => Track 5: Response/Restoration ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jjC6EAI [contactid] => 0038000000rRek9AAC [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bradford Benggio [salutation] => [firstname] => Bradford [lastname] => Benggio [title] => Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => NOAA - Office of Response & Restoration [bio] => Bradford Benggio has been the NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator for USCG District Seven since 1992. Since that time, he has responded to hundreds of pollution and other emergency events, both real and as a participant in exercises. He served as an officer in NOAA's Commissioned Corps where he had a very scientific and operational career focus. He brings with him the experience provided by nearly 40 years of work for NOAA and in scientific response and contingency planning activities. He has authored over 30 papers, technical reports, and conference presentations and regularly trains USCG, EPA, state, other federal agencies, and industry personnel on many aspects of pollution response and planning. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000vap2YMAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABgorEAD [contactid] => 00380000012ipzPAAQ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Overview of ESF-10 Mission [abstract] => [name] => Michael Sams [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Sams [title] => Incident Management and Preparedness Advisor [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard 8th District [bio] => In June 2012, Michael Sams became the inaugural Incident Management & Preparedness Advisor for the Eighth Coast Guard District located in New Orleans, LA. Mr. Sams serves as the District's lead expert on Coast Guard operations and connectivity under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and the National Response Framework (NRF). He serves as the link between the District and the regional intergovernmental response community, as a deployable response resource coordinator, and as a technical advisor to the District Commander. Mr. Sams is responsible for integrating Coast Guard plans with the regional intergovernmental operating plans. He is also responsible for ensuring that the preparedness cycle of planning, training, exercising, evaluating, and revising is continually implemented. Mr. Sams serves as the Co-Chair of the Region 6, 7, and 8 Regional Response Teams, and is the Regional Chair for Mexico/United States Joint Response Team. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078y6KAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T20:54:26Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AESV6EAP [contactid] => 003C000001YsrfKIAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Overview of Scientific Support Within the Environmental Unit for ESF Hurricane Response [abstract] => [name] => Adam Davis [salutation] => [firstname] => Adam [lastname] => Davis [title] => Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => Emergency Response Division, Office of Response and Restoration, NOAA [bio] => Adam is a response professional with over 13 years of dedicated emergency response experience. For the last 6 years, Adam has served as a NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator at the Disaster Response Center in Mobile, AL. In this role, Adam serves as the primary scientific adviser for oil spill and hazardous material response to the Federal On Scene Coordinator for Sector's Mobile, Lower Mississippi River, Ohio Valley, and Upper Mississippi River. As a NOAA SSC, Adam has responded to numerous oil spills and chemical incidents in both the inland and coastal zone. Recently, Adam served as the lead Scientific Support Coordinator for ESF 10 Operations in the US Virgin Islands for Hurricanes Maria and Irma as well as Florida for Hurricane Michael. Prior to his role with NOAA, Adam served as a Superfund Technical Assistance Response Team contractor for the US EPA and responded directly to numerous oil and chemical spills throughout EPA Region 4. Prior to that, Adam proudly served in the United States Army as a Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Operations Specialist in the 101st Airborne Division and deployed to the former Yugoslavia during Operation Joint Endeavor. Adam graduated cum laude (with honors) from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of West Florida where he received his degree in Environmental Science. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000vLaVoMAKw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-09T15:46:16Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000027M5SJIA0 [name] => Timyn Rice [firstname] => Timyn [lastname] => Rice [title] => State Scientific Support Coordinator [company] => Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AESVGEA5 [contactid] => 003C000001hSvE0IAK [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Photo Acquisitions and Interpretations to Support ESF 10 Hurricane Response [abstract] => [name] => Mark White [salutation] => [firstname] => Mark [lastname] => White [title] => GIS Analyst [suffix] => [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-15T04:01:27Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001hSv7VIAS [name] => Jacqui Michel [firstname] => Jacqui [lastname] => Michel [title] => President [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcWbMAI [contactid] => 003C000002RWDSwIAP [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Seagrass Impacts and Restoration following Large Vessel Salvage under the ESF-10 Hurricane Michael Response in Northwest Florida [abstract] => The M/V El Dorado, a 147-ft/225-ton vessel, went aground during Hurricane Michael in 2-3 ft of water in the interior of a shallow seagrass bed in St. Andrew Bay, Florida, roughly 1,000 ft from the nearest deep-water channel. The El Dorado was removed under the Hurricane Michael ESF-10 emergency response as it presented pollution and physical threats to human health and safety and the surrounding environment. Due to the level of potential seagrass impacts that could result from the operation, emergency state and federal permits were required. Permit conditions required the restoration of any response impacts to seagrasses. Up to 43,000 sf (~1 ac) of temporary seagrass response impacts were authorized. Initial response-related seagrass impacts totaled 9,079 sf (0.21 ac). Seagrass impacts were minimized as a result of careful salvage planning, pre-salvage seagrass surveys, the use of large roller bags, operational supervision, environmental monitoring, and the observance of environmental best management practices. Impacts were the result of inadvertent work barge grounding, necessary support barge spudding, the need to flush ~200 tons of accumulated sand out of the vessel hull, and limited bottom scarring where the vessel had to be set down for stabilization, repositioning, and righting. Post-salvage seagrass restoration actions included fine-scale diver-directed suction dredging, low-pressure flushing, and raking of sand deposits/berms to natural grade, re-exposing buried seagrasses; coupled with filling vessel removal scars and spud holes with clean sand to restore natural grade. Following restoration, remaining seagrass impacts, defined as areas mainly lacking seagrass during the immediate post-restoration monitoring, totaled <1,771 sf (<0.04 ac). The minimization of impacts combined with the ability to repair seagrass impacts quickly significantly reduced potential long-term seagrass damages that could have occurred during an operation of this scale. All seagrass impacts are expected to recover to baseline conditions without further intervention. Given the reduction of hurricane-caused ongoing and future seagrass impacts that would have occurred had the El Dorado not been removed, the ESF-10 response concluded that the removal of this vessel resulted in a net environmental benefit for seagrass resources. [name] => Hal Fravel [salutation] => [firstname] => Hal [lastname] => Fravel [title] => Senior Scientist [suffix] => [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) [bio] => Hal Fravel is a Senior Scientist with RPI based in Tallahassee, Florida. He specializes in scientific oil spill and hurricane response, damage assessment, and restoration. He served as one of the Environmental Unit Leaders during the Hurricane Michael ESF-10 response in Florida in 2018-2019. He has similar experience with ESF-10 response following Hurricanes Irma and Maria in the Florida Keys and Puerto Rico. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078PnfAAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T21:10:34Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000027M5ZMIA0 [name] => Scott Zengel [firstname] => Scott [lastname] => Zengel [title] => Vice President [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000027M5SJIA0 [name] => Timyn Rice [firstname] => Timyn [lastname] => Rice [title] => State Scientific Support Coordinator [company] => Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-15T04:01:27Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
6D: Inland and Offshore Exercise Compliance Differences
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560Q7EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T17:00:00 [name] => 6D: Inland and Offshore Exercise Compliance Differences [room] => 267 [notes] => Add - Building IMT/Training for both, Joe White, What are Offshore Requirement, BSEE TBD, What are Inland Requirements, Eddie Murphy, PHSMA, How to Documents NRPEP from Design to Report [abstract] =>

This panel of experts will discuss and compare the compliance requirements for inland and offshore operators and how the meet them.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6iEAG [name] => Track 6: Training and Exercise Best Management Practices ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jiBfEAI [contactid] => 003C000001GyNfKIAV [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Michael Baccigalopi [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Baccigalopi [title] => Oil Spill Advisor [suffix] => [company] => BP Gulf of Mexico [bio] => Michael Baccigalopi has a Bachelor of Science in Marine Science from Texas A&M University at Galveston class of 1999 and a Master of Science in Environmental Science from Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi. He is currently an Area Manager for the Texas General Land Office Oil Spill Prevention and Response Program in Port Lavaca, and is the Science and Technology Committee Chair for Regional Response Team-6. Prior to becoming the area manager, he spent a total six years as a response officer for the Texas General Land Office Oil Spill Prevention and Response Program in Corpus Christi and Houston offices. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVWMEA5 [contactid] => 003C000001GyNtFIAV [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Joe White [salutation] => [firstname] => Joe [lastname] => White [title] => HSE Manager, Crisis and Emergency Management [suffix] => [company] => Occidental Petroleum [bio] => Joseph is a Sr. HSE Representative for Anadarko in the Crisis and Emergency Management group, and has been with Anadarko since 2011. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:36:46Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVnhEAH [contactid] => 0038000000w0BIEAA2 [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bryan Rogers [salutation] => [firstname] => Bryan [lastname] => Rogers [title] => Acting Chief, Preparedness Verification Branch [suffix] => [company] => Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) [bio] => Bryan Rogers, Senior Planning Analyst, Oil Spill Response Division, BSEE: Mr. Rogers serves as a regional expert specializing in matters related to offshore oil spill preparedness, containment, and cleanup. Mr. Rogers has helped establish, promulgate or evaluate policies, guidelines, procedures, and methodologies that guide the operations, implementation, and management related to oil spill planning and preparedness for facilities located in state and federal offshore waters in the Gulf of Mexico. This includes coordination of review and approval of oil spill response plans, conducting unannounced oil spill exercises, and responding to oil spills involving offshore facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Mr. Rogers served as the BSEE Agency Representative in the Houma Command Post during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response, and currently serves on Regional Response Teams 4 and 6, and several Area Committees in the GOM. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-30T17:38:34Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVXoEAP [contactid] => 003C000001P85YkIAJ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Randy Wagner [salutation] => [firstname] => Randy [lastname] => Wagner [title] => Vice President of Exercise, Response & Training [suffix] => [company] => The Response Group [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABsCtEAL [contactid] => 003C000001PWPsYIAX [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Eddie Murphy [salutation] => [firstname] => Eddie [lastname] => Murphy [title] => Emergency Mamagement Specialist [suffix] => [company] => U.S. DOT PHMSA [bio] => Eddie Murphy is an Emergency Specialist with U.S. DOT PHMSA in the Preparedness, Emergency Support and Security Division in Washington, DC. This division reviews and approves operator's oil spill response plans, supports PHMSA during incidents and national emergencies, observes and evaluates oil spill exercises, and serves as the DOT representative on the PREP 4C Committee. Eddie is originally from Ithaca, New York and attended Cornell University. He has been with DOT PHMSA since 2012. He was previously employed at Hillsborough County Fire Rescue Office of Emergency Management as Hazardous Materials Planner, and is veteran of the United States Coast Guard. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000014ZCU7MAOw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-06T18:25:45Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:36:46Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
7D: Strengthening Inland Partnerships - A Unified Command Discussion
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560KYEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-29T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T17:00:00 [name] => 7D: Strengthening Inland Partnerships - A Unified Command Discussion [room] => 268 [notes] => Adding someone for Well Control and an OSRO. Jon will do an introductory 10 - 15 minute presentation at the beginning. [abstract] =>

After an initial overview of the growth of the inland oil and gas industry, the panel will discuss various and timely topics relating to preparedness. Planning and the importance of strengthening partnerships as we continue to develop our interior regions.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6OEAW [name] => Track 7: Inland Preparedness and Response ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jbOsEAI [contactid] => 003C000001GyNiWIAV [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Greg Duncan [salutation] => [firstname] => Greg [lastname] => Duncan [title] => Director, Crisis Management & Emergency Response [suffix] => [company] => ConocoPhillips [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jbP2EAI [contactid] => 003C0000018NXWXIA4 [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Jon Wickersham [salutation] => [firstname] => Jon [lastname] => Wickersham [title] => ER Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company [bio] => Jon Wickersham - Colonial Pipeline Company Emergency Response Program Specialist Jon Wickersham serves as an Emergency Response Program Specialist for Colonial Pipeline Company, the largest refined pipeline system in the U.S. In his role, he is responsible for developing integrated contingency preparedness and planning solutions to effectively prepare for, mobilize and respond to incidents. His primary areas of focus are risk management, initial response prioritization, and operational readiness & competence. Jon works with Colonial employees, regulators, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), state and local first responders and communities to ensure all entities are prepared for an incident response. This includes coordinating training exercises, drill events, and ongoing education and awareness programs; which includes an enhanced planning approach Jon developed for field validating and classifying nearly 5,000 recovery points along the Colonial pipeline system. Prior to joining Colonial in 2015, Jon worked in the operational spill response industry for over 20 years. Throughout his tenure in the industry, he has been involved in response efforts for major petroleum, natural disaster incidents affecting the Midwest, eastern and gulf coasts of the United States. Jon is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and a holds a bachelor's degree in Management and Information Systems from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001FfYdHMAVw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jj4qEAA [contactid] => 003C000001nfUK1IAM [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Cody Fisher P.E., BCEE [salutation] => [firstname] => Cody [lastname] => Fisher [title] => Chief, Emergency Response Division [suffix] => P.E., BCEE [company] => Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000053OoiAAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jj50EAA [contactid] => 003C000001P85ZFIAZ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bryant Smalley [salutation] => [firstname] => Bryant [lastname] => Smalley [title] => Oil Spill & Response Team Leader and Federal On-Scene Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => U.S. EPA, Region 6 [bio] => Bryant Smalley began his career at EPA as an Inspector in Region 6. He has conducted and overseen hundreds of compliance inspections throughout the years. Since 2010, he has served as a Federal On-Scene Coordinator, overseeing the cleanup of oil spills and chemical releases. Currently he is the lead for the Oil Spill & Response Team, implementing both the oil spill prevention and response program in EPA Region 6. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVkdEAH [contactid] => 003C000001G5cIUIAZ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Vincent Velasquez [salutation] => [firstname] => Vincent [lastname] => Velasquez [title] => Response Planning Manager [suffix] => [company] => Wild Well Control [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVknEAH [contactid] => 003C000001ruT1UIAU [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Nic Winslow [salutation] => [firstname] => Nic [lastname] => Winslow [title] => Manager Hazmat Planning [suffix] => [company] => BNSF Railroad [bio] => Emergency Response Manger for BNSF Railway. Manage Hazmat Planning for PHMSA, Facility Response Plans and State contingency plan development. Manage emergency responses for spills to water in 28 states. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-09-23T16:52:15Z )
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Voodoo on the Bayou Networking Reception in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnC3EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-29T22:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-29T23:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-29T17:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-29T18:30:00 [name] => Voodoo on the Bayou Networking Reception in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => Array ( [0] => 0693b0000078ytMAAQ ) [sponsorlogos] => Array ( [0] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078ytMAAQw200h100.png ) [modified] => 2019-10-07T22:35:15Z )

Wednesday, October 30

8:00 am - 10:00 am
Relax and Recover Breakfast, hosted by LiquidFrameworks*
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hoACEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T13:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T08:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [name] => Relax and Recover Breakfast, hosted by LiquidFrameworks* [room] => 260 [notes] => [abstract] =>

Let LiquidFrameworks help you relax before the day starts or recover from the previous evening’s festivities! No sales pitches or presentations, just a breakfast buffet and Bloody Marys.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => Array ( [0] => 0693b0000078ytWAAQ ) [sponsorlogos] => Array ( [0] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078ytWAAQw200h100.png ) [modified] => 2019-10-07T22:39:04Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
2E: Case Studies - Turning Lessons into Preparation
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560LMEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [name] => 2E: Case Studies - Turning Lessons into Preparation [room] => 262 [notes] => Case studies on Rattlesnake Bayou (Chuck Armbruster), Shell Glider (Shawn Essert); LLOG and TBD [abstract] =>

In this session lessons learned from recent incidents will be examined and how you can apply those learnings to contingency plans.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcdsEAA [contactid] => 003C00000178xQ5IAI [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Pat Peavler [salutation] => [firstname] => Pat [lastname] => Peavler [title] => Manager, HSE Management System [suffix] => [company] => TOTAL E&P USA, INC. [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcebEAA [contactid] => 0038000000rRejfAAC [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Charles Armbruster [salutation] => [firstname] => Charles [lastname] => Armbruster [title] => Coastal Resources Scientist Manager [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABqX6EAL [contactid] => 003C000001YsrfJIAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Bayport Channel Collision: Improved Assessments for Mid-Stream Petroleum Refining Products [abstract] => [name] => Paige Doelling Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Paige [lastname] => Doelling [title] => Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => NOAA/NOS/ORR/ERD [bio] => Dr. Paige Doelling has been the NOAA SSC for coastal Louisiana and Texas since late 2013, serving as the principal scientific advisor to the Coast Guard for oil and hazmat spill response and planning in the coastal zone. She has been lead SSC on several major responses, including the Texas City Y oil spill response (2014), the Morgan's Point Collision hazmat spill response (2015), the Green Canyon 248 offshore oil spill response (2016), and Hurricane Harvey (2017) as well as dozens of smaller oil and hazmat responses. She works on science and preparedness issues at the Coast Guard unit, Area Committee (AC), and Regional Response Team (RRT) levels and serves as an instructor for NOAA's Science of Oil Spills (SOS), and Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) classes. Dr. Doelling came to the SSC position with a strong background in ecotoxicology, protected resources, and interagency coordination. In her previous position at National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), she worked on Endangered Species Act (ESA) Section 7 consultations with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on pesticides and water quality issues, and spent a year at NOAA Headquarters as a Fishery Policy Advisor, working on national-level fisheries policy issues. She has worked for several Federal agencies, including EPA, where she wrote ecological risk assessments for pesticides; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) Chesapeake Bay Field Office, where she did stream assessment and restoration, and worked on a range of contaminant issues. Her dissertation focused on the trophic transfer of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an estuarine food web. She served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force, providing imagery and targeting support to U.S. troops during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm, reaching the rank of Captain (O-3). Paige later spent several years as a defense consultant working with imagery-based products and information. She holds a PhD in Environmental Science and Public Policy, an MA in International Transactions, a BS in Biochemistry, and a First-Degree Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. When not at work, she is likely to be found at the yoga studio, or outside hiking with a black Labrador. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000UMrjHMATw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-02T18:43:53Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABsuWEAT [contactid] => 003C000001P85T0IAJ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Lessons Learned from the Glider Field Subsea Well Spill [abstract] => [name] => Shawn Essert [salutation] => [firstname] => Shawn [lastname] => Essert [title] => Emergency Response Manager [suffix] => [company] => Shell Exploration & Production Company [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-02T18:43:53Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
4E: The Human Element - Part II
Array ( [id] => a0FC0000016rJANMA2 [starttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [name] => 4E: The Human Element - Part II [room] => 265 [notes] => 2. Update on the Sea Grant community workshop series. One was already held in Houma, this is the link to the next one in Virgina https://gulfseagrant.org/oilspilloutreach/collaborative-workshop-series/mid-atlantic-oil-spill-are-we-ready/ 3. Update / briefing on the public health chapter of the NASEM dispersant study (probably published around the end of this month 4. Potentially also health considerations for those involved in oiled wildlife cleaning [abstract] =>

This session further explores emerging trends in the human element of oil spill preparedness and response, which was first incorporated into the 2018 Clean Gulf program. Speakers will highlight evolving knowledge about potential worker and public health concerns associated with spilled oil and dispersants during response.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6dEAG [name] => Track 4: Emerging Trends and Concerns ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lj6lMAA [contactid] => 003C000001OTHQmIAP [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Ann Hayward Walker BFA, MBA [salutation] => [firstname] => Ann [lastname] => Hayward Walker [title] => President [suffix] => BFA, MBA [company] => SEA Consulting Group [bio] => Ann Hayward Walker, Founder and President of SEA Consulting Group, has over 30 years of experience in oil spill preparedness and response, with an emphasis on facilitating collaboration among government agencies, industry, responders and academia. Ms. Walker has a BFA from the University of Hawaii in Architecture and Environmental Planning and a MBA in Management from Golden Gate University. Ms. Walker is a former NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator and has been involved in dispersant decision making since the early 1980s. She was also assigned to the Aerial Dispersant unit in the Houma incident command post during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000kCjGmMAKw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABDDJEA5 [contactid] => 0038000000rReuCAAS [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Human Health Considerations for Oiled Wildlife Responders [abstract] => [name] => Michael Ziccardi DVM MPVM PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Ziccardi [title] => Director [suffix] => DVM MPVM PhD [company] => Oiled Wildlife Care Network [bio] => Dr. Ziccardi received his DVM, MPVM, and PhD in epidemiology from UC Davis, emphasizing free-ranging wildlife health and the effects of petroleum exposure in wildlife. He has been an oil spill response veterinarian and coordinator since 1996, responding to more than 50 spills in the US and abroad, including as the Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Group Leader for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and the Deputy Wildlife Branch Director for the Refugio Incident in 2015. He has worked as a contract veterinarian for California Department of Fish and Game, a wildlife epidemiologist at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, and as Associate Professor of Clinical Wildlife Health for UC Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. His current positions are Director of the Oiled Wildlife Care Network, Co-Director of UC Davis' Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, and Health Science Clinical Professor at UC Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000792Y8AAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-14T21:28:29Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABDAFEA5 [contactid] => 0033b00002SpPGCAA3 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Human-Health Focused Collaborative Workshop Series of the National Academies of Science and Gulf Research Program: Regional Priority Setting for Health, Social, and Economic Disruption from Spills [abstract] => [name] => Melissa Partyka Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Melissa [lastname] => Partyka [title] => Extension Specialist [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => MS-AL Sea Grant, Auburn University [bio] => Based in Mobile, Alabama, with the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, Missy has a record of using her advanced degrees in integrated ecology to work closely with the public to research and explain complex environmental issues, particularly those relating to water quality and food safety. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078ybcAAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T20:37:59Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABDCuEAP [contactid] => 0033b00002S4T0TAAV [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Human Health Considerations in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Report: The Use of Dispersants in Marine Oil Spill Response [abstract] => [name] => Bernard Goldstein MD [salutation] => [firstname] => Bernard [lastname] => Goldstein [title] => Professor Emeritus, Environmental and Occupations Health [suffix] => MD [company] => University of Pittsburgh [bio] => Dr. Goldstein is Professor Emeritus of Environmental and Occupational Health and the former Dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He is a physician, board certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology and in Toxicology. Dr Goldstein is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. His experience includes serving as Assistant Administrator for Research and Development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1983-1985; and founding Director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute at Rutgers University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He has chaired more than a dozen National Research Council (NRC) and IOM committees, most recently the Committee on Sustainability at EPA. He has been president of the Society for Risk Analysis and has served as a member or chairperson of numerous US government and United Nations committees. His current interests include a variety of energy-related issues including shale gas, the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill, the interface between science and policy, and EU/US differences in environmental policy, [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-06T13:57:49Z [status] => Invited [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lc9KMAQ [contactid] => 003C000001Ysre1IAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Looking Back at the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Can Exposure to Dispersants Really be Linked to Health Effects? [abstract] => Supported by the results of large collections of exposure data for workers responding to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DH) oil spill, we evaluated the assertion in recent retrospective studies that a significant number of responders to the DH incident with reported health effects were exposed to dispersants. The risk of dispersants to human health depends on the intrinsic hazards of the chemicals and the frequency, severity, and duration of human exposure. Most dispersant components are generally regarded as safe or are acceptable for food contact, are found in consumer and industrial products often used in daily life, and their potential toxicities are well understood. During the DH response, industrial hygienists representing the Unified Command mandated protective equipment for workers loading and operating dispersant application planes and vessels. In addition, a 2-5 nautical mile exclusion zone was enacted for aerial dispersant applications. Once dispersants contact oil slicks or water, the mixture becomes entrained in the sea and is quickly biodegraded. Thus, it is unlikely that vessel or shoreline workers were exposed to dispersants. Extensive sampling for dispersant chemicals conducted during the DH response revealed no significant exposures to the response workforce. We conclude that the origin of reported health impacts to workers involved in the DH response cannot be scientifically linked to dispersant exposures. [name] => Paul Nony [salutation] => [firstname] => Paul [lastname] => Nony [title] => Principal Toxicologist and Director of Toxicology and Occupational Health [suffix] => PhD, CIH, CSP [company] => CTEH, LLC [bio] => Dr. Paul Nony is the Director of Toxicology and Occupational Health at CTEH, an environmental consulting firm headquartered in North Little Rock, Arkansas. Dr. Nony has over 20 years of training and professional experience in the fields of chemical emergency response, worker health and safety, environmental toxicology. He received his PhD in Interdisciplinary Toxicology from the University of Arkansas and spent two years in a postdoctoral fellowship at NIEHS. Since joining CTEH in 2003, he has responded to hundreds of emergency situations involving the release of chemicals to the environment. During emergency responses, Dr. Nony leads teams of scientists who characterize and communicate the extent of chemical hazard and other safety impacts to workers, communities, and the environment while assisting industry, agency, and community stakeholders alike to make decisions during disaster recovery. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000016GdJbMAKw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-18T17:20:06Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-14T21:28:29Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
5E: Wildlife Oil Spill Response: Policies, Procedures, Observations, and Potential Outcomes
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hmxmEAA [starttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [name] => 5E: Wildlife Oil Spill Response: Policies, Procedures, Observations, and Potential Outcomes [room] => 266 [notes] => [abstract] =>

This session will provide an overview of wildlife response in Louisiana and discuss the fates and effects of oil on wildlife. Professionals in the field will explore these topics and discuss outcomes seen through, observation, rehabilitation, and toxicity studies. 

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6QEAW [name] => Track 5: Response/Restoration ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABqrVEAT [contactid] => 003C000001JxZjNIAV [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Gina M. Saizan [salutation] => [firstname] => Gina [lastname] => Saizan [title] => Natural Resource Damage Assessment Manager [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => Gina Muhs Saizan is the Damage Assessment Program Manager with the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office. Prior to LOSCO she worked as a responder with the Texas General Land Office and in private consulting for the oil and gas industry. Ms. Saizan has over 25 years of experience in oil spill response and natural resource management. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001NnzKOMAZw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-19T15:45:50Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABqraEAD [contactid] => 003C0000015yAIiIAM [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Rhonda Murgatroyd [salutation] => [firstname] => Rhonda [lastname] => Murgatroyd [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => Wildlife Response Services, LLC [bio] => Rhonda Murgatroyd is the owner and managing director of Wildlife Response Services, LLC located in the Houston/Galveston area. She has been involved in wildlife rehabilitation and oiled wildlife response for over fifteen years, and possesses both federal and multiple state permits to work with native wildlife. Rhonda works with several rehabilitation groups and area veterinarians along the Gulf Coast and inland areas. She is a past board member of Armand Bayou Nature Center, was the lead facilitator for Youth Educational Support Services Water-Borne BaySmart program for an eight year period, and is a current member of the Clean Gulf Planning Committee and Spill Control Association of America (SCAA). Rhonda has filled various roles in several large-scale emergency responses, consults with industry and private entities regarding site specific contingency planning, and from April 2010 through August 2011 served as Wildlife Branch Director for the Deepwater Horizon Incident. Since the formation of WRS in December of 2007, Ms. Murgatroyd and her team have responded to over forty incidents along the gulf coast and inland states, managing three incidents concurrently on more than one occasion. Rhonda and the WRS team possess a diverse and high level of experience, and are prepared to respond to any wildlife incident with a premier network of professionals. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000kCNPcMAOw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABrYyEAL [contactid] => 0033b00002S5biDAAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Oil Spill Wildlife Response Operations in Louisiana [abstract] => [name] => Jonathan Wiebe MS [salutation] => [firstname] => Jonathan [lastname] => Wiebe [title] => Oil Spill Program Manager [suffix] => MS [company] => Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries [bio] => Jon's primary responsibilities, as LDWF's Oil Spill Program Manager, consist of coordination, direction, and programmatic oversight of oiled wildlife response documentation and implementation of restoration and conservation measures for impacted natural resources in association with oil spills. Jon's principal restoration activities are centered around Deepwater Horizon (DWH) within the State's coastal zone and northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) in association with the Louisiana and Region-wide Technical Implementation Groups (TIGs). Jon has also conducted and overseen the evaluation of diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) throughout coastal Louisiana including documentation of prime nesting areas. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-08T14:43:47Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABrGGEA1 [contactid] => 0033b00002S5bOUAAZ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Toxicology of Avian Wildlife with Oil Exposure [abstract] => [name] => Kendal Harr DVM, MS, DACVP [salutation] => [firstname] => Kendal [lastname] => Harr [title] => Veterinary Pathologist [suffix] => DVM, MS, DACVP [company] => URIKA [bio] => Dr. Harr graduated from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1995. After practicing as a primary veterinarian for two years in a small animal and exotic species practice, she trained as a resident in clinical pathology at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine and attained ACVP board certification. During her residency she won a 1st place in toxicology for validation of a real time PCR assay to assess biomarkers in brown trout. She completed a masters in comparative immunology and diagnostic assay development in 2004 titled "Diagnostic Development of Acute Phase Proteins in Manatees"; for which she won the Excellence in Clinical Research Award from the University of Florida. Since that time, she has worked at UF as the Associate Director of Aquatic Animal Health, worked for IDEXX, and now owns her own pathology company, URIKA, LLC. She is also on the editorial board for Journal of Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine. She was a co Principal Investigator for the USFWS led Avian Toxicity Project during the DWH NRDA and will be presenting a small component of that research. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-09T20:30:06Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABrD7EAL [contactid] => 0038000000rReuCAAS [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Oiled Wildlife Rehabilitation: A Veterinarian Perspective on Data Collection [abstract] => [name] => Michael Ziccardi DVM MPVM PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Ziccardi [title] => Director [suffix] => DVM MPVM PhD [company] => Oiled Wildlife Care Network [bio] => Dr. Ziccardi received his DVM, MPVM, and PhD in epidemiology from UC Davis, emphasizing free-ranging wildlife health and the effects of petroleum exposure in wildlife. He has been an oil spill response veterinarian and coordinator since 1996, responding to more than 50 spills in the US and abroad, including as the Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Group Leader for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and the Deputy Wildlife Branch Director for the Refugio Incident in 2015. He has worked as a contract veterinarian for California Department of Fish and Game, a wildlife epidemiologist at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, and as Associate Professor of Clinical Wildlife Health for UC Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. His current positions are Director of the Oiled Wildlife Care Network, Co-Director of UC Davis' Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, and Health Science Clinical Professor at UC Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000792Y8AAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-14T18:53:46Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-14T18:53:46Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
6E: Exercise Designing for Success
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560PJEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [name] => 6E: Exercise Designing for Success [room] => 267 [notes] => ADD - Exercise Insights, TRG (Kevin Madison to invite); Real World Experience in Exercises, Art Powers (Stephanie to invite); Exercise Elements, Jon Wickersham (Emily to invite); Designing Area Exercises, USCG (Emily to invite) [abstract] =>

This session will focus on designing exercises to not only meet NPREP and company requirements, but to also serve as a training opportunity. It will highlight how to go beyond Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) to design exercises that test the plans and challenges faced by Incident Management Teams (IMT).

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6iEAG [name] => Track 6: Training and Exercise Best Management Practices ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgaIEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001JXnYXIA1 [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Stephen Pepper [salutation] => [firstname] => Stephen [lastname] => Pepper [title] => Director, Crisis Management [suffix] => [company] => Phillips 66 [bio] => Stephen Pepper is the Director, Crisis Management for Phillips 66. An emergency management professional, Steve has more than 30 years of experience in a variety of health, safety, and emergency response roles. He began his career serving in the USMC infantry from 1984-1988. Upon his Honorable Discharge from the Marine Corps he began working in the oil and gas sector where he has held a number of positions of increasing responsibility in the petro-chemicals, refining, midstream, and upstream environments. Stephen was born in Golden Colorado and has completed undergraduate degrees in Emergency Management Administration from West Texas A&M University and Safety Management from University of Alaska. He has also graduated from Texas A&M University with an MS in Adult Education and currently completing his coursework for a PhD in Fire and Emergency Management at Oklahoma State University. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001HwtNjMAJw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-14T17:28:50Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABHC0EAP [contactid] => 003C000001P85YkIAJ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Exercise Insights [abstract] => [name] => Randy Wagner [salutation] => [firstname] => Randy [lastname] => Wagner [title] => Vice President of Exercise, Response & Training [suffix] => [company] => The Response Group [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABFmzEAH [contactid] => 003C000001YsrgyIAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Real-World Experience in Exercises [abstract] => [name] => Art Powers [salutation] => [firstname] => Art [lastname] => Powers [title] => Emergency Preparedness & Response Advisor [suffix] => [company] => ExxonMobil Corporation [bio] => Earned a BS in Marine Transportation from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in 1993. Started with ExxonMobil in, working primarily in the pipeline and fuels distribution affiliates of the company. In 2010 earned a Masters of Science Degree in Emergency Management from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. In 2014, began current role as an Emergency Preparedness and Response advisor for ExxonMobil's Central SSHE department, with a focus area as the coordinator of the Americas Regional Response Team, which is an all-volunteer reserve force of employees trained to support business lines in the event of a large scale emergency. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001K2IJYMA3w500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-08T20:19:02Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABFn9EAH [contactid] => 003C0000018NXWXIA4 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Exercise Elements [abstract] => [name] => Jon Wickersham [salutation] => [firstname] => Jon [lastname] => Wickersham [title] => ER Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Colonial Pipeline Company [bio] => Jon Wickersham - Colonial Pipeline Company Emergency Response Program Specialist Jon Wickersham serves as an Emergency Response Program Specialist for Colonial Pipeline Company, the largest refined pipeline system in the U.S. In his role, he is responsible for developing integrated contingency preparedness and planning solutions to effectively prepare for, mobilize and respond to incidents. His primary areas of focus are risk management, initial response prioritization, and operational readiness & competence. Jon works with Colonial employees, regulators, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), state and local first responders and communities to ensure all entities are prepared for an incident response. This includes coordinating training exercises, drill events, and ongoing education and awareness programs; which includes an enhanced planning approach Jon developed for field validating and classifying nearly 5,000 recovery points along the Colonial pipeline system. Prior to joining Colonial in 2015, Jon worked in the operational spill response industry for over 20 years. Throughout his tenure in the industry, he has been involved in response efforts for major petroleum, natural disaster incidents affecting the Midwest, eastern and gulf coasts of the United States. Jon is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and a holds a bachelor's degree in Management and Information Systems from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001FfYdHMAVw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-14T17:28:50Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
8E: In Situ Burn (ISB) Applications
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560L2EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [name] => 8E: In Situ Burn (ISB) Applications [room] => 268 [notes] => Add Guide to ISB Emissions (CTEH/API) - Victoria to find Add Herders - Victoria? [abstract] =>

This session will focus on In Situ Burn application in inland and offshore environments. Presentations will include history/case studies of ISB’s in Louisiana, direct measurement of ISB rates/efficiency, and a guide on ISB emissions.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6PEAW [name] => Track 8: Applied Response Techniques ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jc6fEAA [contactid] => 003C000001JxZZuIAN [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Chris Sanfilippo [salutation] => [firstname] => Chris [lastname] => Sanfilippo [title] => Environmental Manager - Eastern Division [suffix] => [company] => Texas Petroleum Investment Co. [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019n7VmEAI [contactid] => 0038000000rRejaAAC [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Alan A. Allen [salutation] => [firstname] => Alan [lastname] => Allen [title] => Oil Spill Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Spiltec [bio] => Mr. Alan A. Allen, doing business as Spiltec, is based in Woodinville, Washington, and has over 46 years of experience as a technical advisor and field supervisor involving hundreds of oil spills around the world. He has developed specialized strategies and equipment for the prevention, surveillance and control of oil spills; and he has conducted many hundreds of oil spill training courses under arctic, temperate and tropical conditions. Mr. Allen has provided operational guidance for government and industry organizations involving critical on-scene decisions related to the use of mechanical cleanup, the application of chemical dispersants, and the use of controlled burning. He is recognized as a leading consultant and trainer involving waterborne petroleum fires and their control, the application of chemical dispersants on offshore oil spills, and the containment, recovery and/or combustion of spilled oil under arctic and sub-arctic conditions. Mr. Allen holds three patents on oil spill response equipment, and has used his practical experience in the field to help develop computer models for the fate and transport of oil, and for the planning and assessment of mechanical, burning and dispersant application programs. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-08-28T20:27:43Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lWMMMA2 [contactid] => 003C000001hSv7VIAS [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Lessons Learned from Nearly Two Decades of In-Situ Burning of Wetlands in Louisiana [abstract] => Spills that result in heavily oiled wetlands provide unique challenges for responders because aggressive removal methods can cause additional harm and slow overall recovery of the habitat. These issues are of particular concern for spills that affect the marsh interior, where access is limited. In Louisiana, extensive wetlands are crossed by numerous pipelines and oil wells, and spills can result in heavy oiling of interior habitats, in remote locations. Thus, in-situ burning is often considered as the best response option. Monitoring of in-situ burns in wetlands has provided the scientific basis for evaluating the conditions under which a burn can speed recovery. The lessons learned from seven burns in Louisiana from 2000 to 2018 will be presented. [name] => Jacqui Michel [salutation] => [firstname] => Jacqui [lastname] => Michel [title] => President [suffix] => [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) [bio] => Dr. Michel is an internationally recognized expert in oil and hazardous materials spill planning and response with a primary focus in the areas of oil fates and effects, non-floating oils, shoreline cleanup, alternative response technologies, and natural resource damage assessment. Much of her expertise is derived from her role, since 1978, as part of the Scientific Support Team to the U.S. Coast Guard provided by NOAA. Under this role, she is on 24-hour call and provides technical support for an average of 50 spill events per year. She leads shoreline assessment teams and assists in selecting cleanup methods to minimize the environmental impacts of the spill. Dr. Michel also has extensive expertise in natural resource damage assessment (NRDA). She has been under contract to the NOAA Assessment and Restoration Division since 1992, and since 1985, she has conducted over 30 NRDAs for numerous spills and groundings. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000792ihAAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-13T17:45:16Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000027M5ZMIA0 [name] => Scott Zengel [firstname] => Scott [lastname] => Zengel [title] => Vice President [company] => Research Planning, Inc. (RPI) ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcaPMAQ [contactid] => 003C000001nfUEAIA2 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => The Direct Measurement of In-Situ Burn (ISB) Rate and Efficiency [abstract] => In-situ burning (ISB) is an important tool for removing oil during an oil spill. For an accurate oil budget calculation, it is critical to measure the amount of oil removed during ISB. ISB is a dynamic process, the burning oil does not always fill the boomed area completely, and the burn rate depends on many factors including type of oil, degree of weathering, especially emulsification, thickness, weather conditions, and size of the burn area. An accurate measure of the amount of oil removed is important for oil spill responders, regulators, those monitoring the environmental impact of the spill, and the organization responsible for spilling the oil. While the current manual method to measure the volume of oil consumed during ISB is well codified, it does not incorporate any measurement of the thickness of the oil slick. In addition, the efficiency of ISB can only be determined in the field if the amount of oil spilled is known and the residue collected. We created the capability to measure the instantaneous burn rate and efficiency during ISB based on surface area measurements using both visible and infrared imaging and thickness measurements of the slick using acoustic sensors placed in the water under the burning oil. The acoustic thickness measurements were corrected for the high temperature gradient in the oil and combined with multi-camera automated burn area estimates to yield an accurate volume of oil consumed while burning. The volume measurements of the oil were benchmarked by weighing the oil during ISB by placing the burn apparatus on a scale and recording the weight loss during the burn. The capability developed by this work provides an unprecedented detailed ability to study the dynamics of ISB during burning with sub second time resolution. Using these methods one can identify the buildup of the burn, the active burning phase, and, in the case of confined burns, the vigorous burning phase where the underlying water boils and evaporates. We applied these measurements to 46 burns of various petroleum products including ANS, Rock, Agbami, diesel, and hexane at our laboratory, at the burn laboratory at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and in simulated ice fields at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL). We will report on the development of the methods as well as the new results of the instantaneous decrease in volume, the burn rate, and the resultant efficiency. Our measurements yielded burn rates in the range of 0.2 mm/minute to over 7 mm/minute and efficiencies between 58% and 96% for Alaska North Slope crude oil in small contained burns and in ice fields. We also directly measured the effects of the applications of herders and we deployed the acoustic measurements from a remotely operated vehicle at CRREL. [name] => Paul Panetta [salutation] => [firstname] => Paul [lastname] => Panetta [title] => Chief Scientist [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Applied Research Associates, Inc. | Ohmsett [bio] => Paul Panetta, Ph.D. Lab Director and Chief Scientist of Ohmsett Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA) Education Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, 1999 Dissertation: Ultrasonic wave propagation and microstructure characterization M.S., Condensed Matter Physics, Iowa State University, 1994 Thesis Topic: High Temperature Superconductivity B.S., Applied Physics, University of California-Davis, 1991 Experience Chief Scientist of Ohmsett 2018-Present Lab Director and Acoustics Subject Matter Expert 2009-Present Applied Research Associates, Inc., Littleton, CO Dr. Panetta is the Chief Scientist of Ohmsett and Oil Spill Response Lab Director at Applied Research Associates, Inc. Dr. Panetta's work focuses on acoustic and ultrasonic materials characterization for oil spill response, marine sediments, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications. His work spans from experimental to theoretical and prototype instrument development. Dr. Panetta is currently developing methods to measure the burn rate and efficiency during in-situ burning of oil, developing measurements of herder effectiveness, and transferring these acoustic measurements to ROV and glider platforms. His team is also developing scattering methods to measure oil droplet size to characterize dispersant effectiveness. His work has led to five patents and many publications. Dr. Panetta has over 20 years of experience, with expertise in experimental and theoretical development of ultrasonic scattering to characterize oils, liquids, solid-liquid suspensions, microstructures of steel, nickel, and titanium alloys. Dr. Panetta and his group recently developed an ultrasonic metallurgical tool under Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funding that determines grain size from ultrasonic scattering measurements in nickel super alloys. The methods and software tool were tested at several aircraft engine manufacturing sites and validated through a blind test, bringing it to a TRL 6. Dr. Panetta has been funded a project by the Department of Transportation, the Pipeline Research Council International, and the Department of Energy to measure residual stress using in gas pipelines using ultrasonic birefringence techniques with Electro Magnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) and gained rich experiences in performing the wave speed measurement using EMATs. In previous work for the Department of the Interior, Dr. Panetta's team developed scattering methods to measure oil droplet size to characterize dispersants for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE). [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T16:18:58Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C0000027M5NiIAK [name] => Richard Byrne [firstname] => Richard [lastname] => Byrne [title] => Principal Scientist [company] => Applied Research Associates, Inc. | Ohmsett ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RWDrwIAH [name] => Hualong Du [firstname] => Hualong [lastname] => Du [title] => Principal Scientist [company] => Applied Research Associates, Inc. | Ohmsett ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEX6pEAH [contactid] => 003C000001YsroaIAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Recent Developments on Surface Collection Agent (aka Herder) Research [abstract] => [name] => Tim Nedwed Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Tim [lastname] => Nedwed [title] => STP-A [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company [bio] => Dr. Nedwed is the Oil Spill Response Senior Technical Professional with ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (URC). He has worked for ExxonMobil for 20 years and has led the URC oil spill response research program for the last 15 years. Dr. Nedwed's primary expertise is on oil spill response technologies with a focus on dispersants, in situ burning, remote detection of oil, and oil spill fate and effects. He led two major joint industry projects to develop and understand the use of dispersants in the Arctic and the use of dispersants subsea. The achievements of Dr. Nedwed were recognized by ExxonMobil's Upstream Research Company when he received the 2010 ICE award for outstanding innovation and creativity. In addition, Dr. Nedwed received the prestigious Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award for Technology Innovation given by the Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas in 2013. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T19:58:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-13T17:45:16Z )
10:00 am - 10:45 am
Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnC8EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T15:45:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T10:45:00 [name] => Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-06-05T16:40:29Z )
10:00 am - 4:30 pm
Count Dracula's Blood Drive - Day 2
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016rn0PEAQ [starttime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T21:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T10:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T16:30:00 [name] => Count Dracula's Blood Drive - Day 2 [room] => Hall E [notes] => [abstract] =>

What better way to help mankind and celebrate Halloween at the same time than to donate blood? CLEAN GULF is hosting a Mobile Blood Drive in the Exhibit Hall. Sign-up in advance by clicking here, or wander by and sign up onsite. We promise Count Dracula gets none, but you will walk away with a small token of our thanks and a pint lighter.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b000010KFDjEAO [name] => Other Meetings ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-09-23T17:16:43Z )
10:45 am - 12:15 pm
State and Federal Updates
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnCXEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T15:45:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T17:15:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T10:45:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T12:15:00 [name] => State and Federal Updates [room] => E-3 Entrance [notes] => [abstract] =>

An integral part of preparing for an oil spill response is being current and up-to-date on state and federal regulations. Learn what you need to know to conduct business relative to oil spill response and remediation directly from the federal and state regulators who are responsible for proposing new rules as well as implementation and enforcement.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001196YSEAY [name] => General Sessions ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ACfJaEAL [contactid] => 003C0000025wA2TIAU [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Marty Chabert [salutation] => [firstname] => Marty [lastname] => Chabert [title] => Oil Spill Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000053OloAAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-18T18:21:16Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ACfJkEAL [contactid] => 003C000001OTJN7IAP [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Jimmy Martinez [salutation] => [firstname] => Jimmy [lastname] => Martinez [title] => Deputy Director [suffix] => [company] => Texas General Land Office [bio] => Jimmy Martinez was named Regional Director of the Texas General Land Office, Oil Spill Prevention and Response Office for the South Texas Coastal Zone on April 11, 2008. Jimmy's area of responsibility begins at the East Bank of the Colorado River to the U.S./Mexican Border at the Lower Rio Grande River. Jimmy manages a staff of 20 dedicated employees located in field offices in Port Lavaca, Corpus Christi where the regional headquarters is located and in Brownsville. In addition, Jimmy also serves as co-chair of the South Texas Coastal Zone Area Committee along with the Sector Commander of the United States Coast Guard Sector Corpus Christi. Jimmy and his staff are responsible for enforcement of the Texas Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act of 1991 and it's regulations governing petroleum handling facilities and vessels operating in the South Texas coastal region. Along with his field staff, Jimmy has built his regional offices around two priorities. First, that the Texas General Land Office maintains an emergency preparedness status for "emergency response" with trained personnel and equipment ready to respond to any oil spill notification within our coastal environment. This includes strategically placing specialized state owned oil spill response equipment in sensitive areas such as Wildlife Refuges along with training local jurisdictions to deploy and operate this equipment in an emergency situation. The second priority is to maintain a "Prevention Program" to stop oil spills before they happen. This task is to be accomplished with systematic audits and inspections of oil handling or storage facilities, coupled with frequent patrols in harbors, marinas and remote areas of our bays. Adding to the prevention program, Jimmy has implemented an aggressive outreach program that focuses on educating industry and the general public on the prevention of future oil spills. As the pre-designated "State on Scene Coordinator" for South Texas, Jimmy has responded to hundreds of oil spills within our coastal environment. Some of the more significant spills were the 2006 Valero Tank 22 spill. The 2008 Hurricane Ike response, 2014 Texas City Y Spill and Numerous Tarball Spills along South Padre Island where interaction with Mexican Government officials was critical in coordinating response efforts. Jimmy is a 1985 graduate of A.C. Jones High School in Beeville, Texas. He earned an Associates degree in Political Science from Bee County College in 1987 and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology from Texas A&M University Kingsville in 1991. Jimmy recently served 8 years on the Beeville City Council, where in 2009 he was elected to serve as Mayor for the City of Beeville. A position he held until last year when he decided not to seek re-election. Jimmy strongly accredits his achievements and successes to the dedicated support of his wife Tristen and their four children, Alisha 22, Trey 10, Ryann Olivia 8 and Brock 2. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000053OnBAAUw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-18T18:21:27Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ACfJbEAL [contactid] => 003C000001nfUK1IAM [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Cody Fisher P.E., BCEE [salutation] => [firstname] => Cody [lastname] => Fisher [title] => Chief, Emergency Response Division [suffix] => P.E., BCEE [company] => Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000053OoiAAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nl0oEAA [contactid] => 003C0000027M5S9IAK [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Nick Rolf [salutation] => [firstname] => Nick [lastname] => Roff [title] => Environmental Administrator [suffix] => [company] => Florida Department of Environmental Protection [bio] => Mr. Roff graduated from Ohio University with a B.S. degree in Environmental Health Science in 2012. He joined the department in 2014 and worked in the Southwest District (Tampa) with a focus on Solid Waste, Domestic Wastewater, NPDES Stormwater compliance, and was a Response Assistant for the Office of Emergency Response (OER). Soon after he transferred to the South District (Ft. Myers) where he served as a Professional Responder for OER. In 2018 he was promoted to Environmental Administrator of OER located at the main headquarters in Tallahassee. Mr. Roff is the State's representative for the U.S. National Response Team's Regional Response Team IV (RRT IV), and the State Emergency Response Commission (SERC). He is also the Emergency Coordination Officer (ECO) for the State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC), Emergency Support Function-10 (ESF-10) Hazardous Materials. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078sLQAAYw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-03T15:17:01Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ACfKdEAL [contactid] => 003C000001JxZvEIAV [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Capt. Ricardo Alonso [salutation] => Capt. [firstname] => Ricardo [lastname] => Alonso [title] => Chief [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Marine Environmental Response Policy (CG-MER) [bio] => Captain Ricardo M. Alonso currently oversees the Office of Marine Environmental Response Policy at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington DC. Most recently he served as the Division Chief of the Industry Preparedness & Incident Coordination Division at Coast Guard Headquarters. Prior to these assignments, he was the U.S. Coast Guard Fellow at the Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute in Falls Church, VA where he undertook important research on the normalization of relations between Cuba and the United Sates, human mass migration studies and improvements to area contingency plans in relation to the Endangered Species Act and the Historical Preservation Act. From 2013 to 2016, he served as the Commanding Officer of Marine Safety Unit Texas City, TX. There he was responsible for carrying out the Coast Guard's Homeland Security, Marine Safety, and Marine Environmental Protection missions in the Ports of Galveston, Texas City and Freeport, in over 120-miles of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, a 4,000 square-mile region of the Outer Continental Shelf and the entrance to the nation's largest petrochemical complex. He previously served at the U.S. Coast Guard's Office of Personnel Management where he coordinated the worldwide assignment of all senior Prevention specialty officers which ensured proper development and staffing for mission execution for the service. Prior to that assignment, Captain Alonso served as the Chief of Planning, Readiness and Incident Management at Sector San Juan, Puerto Rico where he ensured the safety, preparedness, and environmental protection of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. There he led in a number of major responses to hurricanes, oil spills, hazardous materials incidents, and worked closely with governmental and industry partners in increasing preparedness and resilience to a variety of contingencies and threats. In addition, he also served as the Chief of the Investigations Division in San Juan, where he led in the investigations to a wide variety of high profile marine casualties and environmental crime cases of national impact. Other previous assignments include Marine Safety Office New Orleans, Louisiana where he served as Port State and Domestic Marine Inspector, Chief of Facilities and Waterways, and Command Center Chief; and Marine Safety Office Morgan City, Louisiana as Chief of Marine Environmental Protection and as an Investigating Officer. CAPT Alonso holds a Master's of Science degree in Environmental Science and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, LA. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001FBRU8MAPw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-25T16:42:15Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ACfKFEA1 [contactid] => 0038000000w0BIEAA2 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bryan Rogers [salutation] => [firstname] => Bryan [lastname] => Rogers [title] => Acting Chief, Preparedness Verification Branch [suffix] => [company] => Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) [bio] => Bryan Rogers, Senior Planning Analyst, Oil Spill Response Division, BSEE: Mr. Rogers serves as a regional expert specializing in matters related to offshore oil spill preparedness, containment, and cleanup. Mr. Rogers has helped establish, promulgate or evaluate policies, guidelines, procedures, and methodologies that guide the operations, implementation, and management related to oil spill planning and preparedness for facilities located in state and federal offshore waters in the Gulf of Mexico. This includes coordination of review and approval of oil spill response plans, conducting unannounced oil spill exercises, and responding to oil spills involving offshore facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Mr. Rogers served as the BSEE Agency Representative in the Houma Command Post during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill response, and currently serves on Regional Response Teams 4 and 6, and several Area Committees in the GOM. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-30T17:38:33Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) [6] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ACfKnEAL [contactid] => 003C000001P85ZFIAZ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bryant Smalley [salutation] => [firstname] => Bryant [lastname] => Smalley [title] => Oil Spill & Response Team Leader and Federal On-Scene Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => U.S. EPA, Region 6 [bio] => Bryant Smalley began his career at EPA as an Inspector in Region 6. He has conducted and overseen hundreds of compliance inspections throughout the years. Since 2010, he has served as a Federal On-Scene Coordinator, overseeing the cleanup of oil spills and chemical releases. Currently he is the lead for the Oil Spill & Response Team, implementing both the oil spill prevention and response program in EPA Region 6. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-25T16:41:51Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 7 ) [7] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019nqzdEAA [contactid] => 003C000001PWPsYIAX [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Eddie Murphy [salutation] => [firstname] => Eddie [lastname] => Murphy [title] => Emergency Management Specialist [suffix] => [company] => U.S. DOT PHMSA [bio] => Eddie Murphy is an Emergency Specialist with U.S. DOT PHMSA in the Preparedness, Emergency Support and Security Division in Washington, DC. This division reviews and approves operator's oil spill response plans, supports PHMSA during incidents and national emergencies, observes and evaluates oil spill exercises, and serves as the DOT representative on the PREP 4C Committee. Eddie is originally from Ithaca, New York and attended Cornell University. He has been with DOT PHMSA since 2012. He was previously employed at Hillsborough County Fire Rescue Office of Emergency Management as Hazardous Materials Planner, and is veteran of the United States Coast Guard. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000014ZCU7MAOw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-30T14:22:02Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 8 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-03T15:17:01Z )
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
Lunch in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnCDEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T17:15:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T12:15:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [name] => Lunch in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-06-05T16:41:00Z )
12:15 pm - 1:30 pm
NEW - Meet and Greet with the State and Federal Agencies
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hokZEAQ [starttime] => 2019-10-30T17:15:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T12:15:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [name] => NEW - Meet and Greet with the State and Federal Agencies [room] => Exhibit Hall - Booth #152 [notes] => Confirmed: BOEM, BSEE, USCG, PHMSA, MDEQ, LOSCO, TGLO and FDEP. Waiting on replies from EPA and TCEQ [abstract] =>

Representatives from BOEM, BSEE, USCG, PHMSA, EPA, LOSCO, TGLO, MDEQ, FDEP, and TCEQ will be on hand in the Exhibit Hall to answer attendee questions relative to their activities. The Meet and Greet will be on Wednesday only.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-09T18:19:55Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
2F: Community Outreach with Emergency Response Planning
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560MFEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00 [name] => 2F: Community Outreach with Emergency Response Planning [room] => 262 [notes] => Add STEM Program Oil Spill workshop Guidance (Ben Baden) [abstract] =>

Far too often industry organizations and federal/state agencies become the face of a response. And sometimes we wait until an incident has occurred to involve the public that would be impacted. From driving the research and networking, to supplementing necessary training programs, community organizations are often times the source for local knowledge and manpower. In this session we will highlight what planning and preparedness truly is through shared training and preparedness opportunities with our community partners. 

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jedOEAQ [contactid] => 0038000000rRejnAAC [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Ben Badon [salutation] => [firstname] => Ben [lastname] => Badon [title] => Emergency Response Advisor, EHS Central Services [suffix] => [company] => Hess Corporation [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078rJ4AAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-26T15:35:00Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jefUEAQ [contactid] => 003C000002OBzLgIAL [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Lt. Charron McCombs [salutation] => [firstname] => Charron [lastname] => McCombs [title] => Incident Management Division Chief [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard MSU HOUMA [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019laNCMAY [contactid] => 003C000001hSvDtIAK [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Citizen Scientist Program Approach to Pre-Impact Response Planning: Dauphin Island, Alabama [abstract] => Citizen science embraces the concept that community groups or individual volunteers can collect and provide meaningful scientific data and become subject matter experts within disciplines where data have been traditionally collected by professional scientists. Classic examples of citizen science include animal, bird, insect, and plant surveys or astronomical observations using private telescopes. The purpose of this study was to establish a group of citizen scientists to collect baseline quantitative, shoreline data that otherwise would not be generated to support oil spill response planning and response operations. Often these data would be developed by the academic community or by federal and state agencies however, pre-impact scientific baseline surveys and monitoring programs are considered a low priority compared to other scientific studies and investigations, so they and are rarely funded. Yet these base line data are essential for trained scientists and decision makers to better understand the potential fate and behavior of stranded oil for pre-response planning and at the time of an incident. In early January of 2017 the community of Dauphin Island Alabama was solicited for involvement in a tarball and beach morphology monitoring program through program advertisement in local establishments and the community monthly newsletter. Within two weeks this effort led to the development of a 6-person team from the approximately 1200 permanent residents, but grew to 10 people as the program evolved. Volunteers were informed that the objectives were: 1) to help them better understand the local shoreline environments through training with oil-spill response and coastal scientists, 2) to survey beach elevation profiles at select locations using easy to learn methods, and 3) to monitor select locations for the distribution of tarballs. The group of citizen scientists received classroom and field training about coastal geomorphology and processes, spill response activities, and tarball identification and tracking. The result of the program is the first year-long dataset of beach profile elevation changes and tarball frequencies of occurrence at seven select locations on the island. This approach provides a template for the development of similar groups elsewhere as a means of supporting pre-impact planning. [name] => Mark Kulp [salutation] => [firstname] => Mark [lastname] => Kulp [title] => Associate Professor [suffix] => PhD [company] => University of New Orleans [bio] => Mark Kulp is an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of New Orleans and the owner of Coastal Science Research Group (CSRG). His major area of research and consulting is the surface and shallow geologic framework of the northern Gulf Coast with a special emphasis on the evolution of the Louisiana coastal plain in response to changes in sediment supply and relative sea level. Some of his investigations include the relationship between marsh health and substrate subsidence and the evolution of barrier islands and inlets in response to coastal erosion and interior wetland loss, as well as the regional latest Quaternary stratigraphy. Additional work focuses on how the geology and geologic processes affect current coastal restoration initiatives across the northern Gulf Coast. He has completed also numerous consulting projects including serving as a SCAT team lead for the Deepwater Horizon and Husky 16TAN spill responses and an expert witness in a wide array of environmental related litigation. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077ZgDAAUw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T21:36:05Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001H1VpXIAV [name] => Ed Owens [firstname] => Ed [lastname] => Owens [title] => President [company] => Owens Coastal Consultants ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000002RW58lIAD [name] => Dinah Maygarden M.A. [firstname] => Dinah [lastname] => Maygarden [title] => Director of Coastal Education Program in Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences, UNO [company] => University of New Orleans ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019laLfMAI [contactid] => 003C000001hSvJcIAK [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Training Fishermen as Oil Spill Responders - 10 Years of Learnings [abstract] => Over 10 years ago, a pilot project was initiated at a response organization (RO) in Nova Scotia to incorporate local fishermen into the spill response training program. It was anticipated that fishermen would contribute invaluable knowledge of the local marine environment, and that they would be capable vessel operators with both navigational and mechanical abilities making them ideal oil spill responders for on-water operations. In a large spill where RO response vessel inventory may be exceeded, fishing vessels may need to be employed as Vessels of Opportunity (VOOs), making training and exercising with these vessels beforehand beneficial. This presentation reviews the learnings from involving fishermen as responders before a spill occurs and outlines the recruiting process, training program, and benefits and challenges of training fishermen as responders. Participation in the training program was excellent due to the fishermen's vested interest in the coastal environment and the knowledge that there could be a loss of income due to fishery closure in the event of a spill. Additionally, participants received industry related training while earning wages, including marine training courses normally taken at the fishermen's expense. There was less attrition within the fishing community over time compared to other groups, a major advantage and cost savings for ROs that are required to maintain specific numbers of responders. However, challenges with safety culture, seasonality, vessel inspections, and vessel classification were encountered. The importance of fishermen and their vessels to responses such as the MC-252 Response and many other smaller responses have become apparent. It is therefore a logical component of contingency planning to train the fishermen who live in our coastal waters, or on our lakes and rivers, before a spill occurs. [name] => Shannon MacDonald [salutation] => [firstname] => Shannon [lastname] => MacDonald [title] => Principal [suffix] => [company] => Triox Environmental Emergencies [bio] => Shannon Mac Donald has worked in the oil spill response business for the past 20 years. She has worked with the Response Organization ECRC as Training and Development Coordinator covering the Atlantic Region, operated her own oil spill consulting business based in Nova Scotia, Canada and then formed Triox Environmental Emergencies with her partners in 2011. She has been involved in a number of responses over the last 20 years including the Husky 16TAN in Saskatchewan using oil detection canines, the MC-252 response in the Gulf of Mexico, the Dalhousie spill, the Wabamun spill, and the MT Arrow (2015) in Canada. Shannon develops and conducts oil spill training for government agencies and industry, including response organizations and oil handling facilities. She is also involved in exercise planning/evaluation and contingency planning for pipeline, rail, offshore and marine operators. Shannon holds a valid marine certificate as a Chief Officer Navigation (Home trade)/Second Officer (Foreign Going) and spent 8 years in the Canadian Coast Guard serving on board icebreakers buoy tenders and search and rescue vessels. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078yDkAAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T16:25:27Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jslqEAA [contactid] => 003C0000015yr6TIAQ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => STEM Program Oil Spill Workshop Guidance and Case Study [abstract] => [name] => Cheryl Scott [salutation] => [firstname] => Cheryl [lastname] => Scott [title] => EHS Advisor [suffix] => [company] => Hess Corporation [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078NUlAAMw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-11T19:22:03Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jvtUEAQ [contactid] => 0033b00002Rfvw4AAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => SONRIS - LDNR's Public Web-Based Portal, and How it Can Be Used During Emergencies [abstract] => SONRIS: Strategic Online Natural Resources Information System, is the Dept. of Natural Resources GIS and information portal for activities in the coastal zone of Louisiana. Information on oil and gas activities, such as well and line locations, with operator information, can be found and used as a resource for contacting the owners of the hazard or spill. More simply put, fisherman or private citizens can utilize the portal in order to acquire pre-spill knowledge about oil/gas operators in their areas. A brief presentation on our program is followed by an online interactive SONRIS tour. [name] => Mark Hogan [salutation] => [firstname] => Mark [lastname] => Hogan [title] => Coastal Resource Scientist Supervisor [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T20:48:18Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T19:22:03Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
4F: Environmental Data Management 2.0
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hmmjEAA [starttime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00 [name] => 4F: Environmental Data Management 2.0 [room] => 265 [notes] => Mike asked me to add after the committee meeting. Described what Mike wants under Other Notes in the speaker record. Mike also added: The element of time: 1. Our session is 90-mins 2. I'll take ~5 mins to open the session, provide "short" bios, set the stage. 3. I'll take ~3 mins to close the session 4. If we have five speakers, each speaker would have 10 to 12 mins (no more than 12 mins each) 5. If we have four speakers, each speaker would have 15 mins 6. We would have 15-20 mins for Q/A Pls let me know if I can answer any questions, or if you have additional thoughts/options. [abstract] => This session will provide participants insight into advancements in incorporating environmental data management into response. Building on the session delivered at the 2018 conference, we will specifically highlight a unique approach to incorporating environmental data management within the Incident Command System during a Preparedness for Response Exercise Program full-scale exercise. [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6dEAG [name] => Track 4: Emerging Trends and Concerns ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABb7iEAD [contactid] => 003C000001GyNkMIAV [function] => Co-Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Maria Hartley Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Maria [lastname] => Hartley [title] => Technical Lead, Emergency Preparedness & Response [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Chevron [bio] => Dr Maria Hartley is the global technical lead in Chevron's Center for Emergency Preparedness and Response and has been with Chevron for 10 years. She is also the assistant lead of Chevron's Environmental Functional Team which is responsible for providing technical specialists to address environmental issues during potential oil spills and other emergencies. Maria has supported oil spill response in Chevron for 8 years responding both domestically and internationally. Receiving both her Doctorate and Masters of ecology from Rice University, she is an Adjunct Assistant Professor teaching Ecosystem Management at Rice, and elected member on the Board of Affiliates for the Professional Master's Program and on the Advisory Board of the School of Natural Sciences. Maria is a British citizen, currently residing in Houston, Texas. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001EAuyiMADw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABb7sEAD [contactid] => 00380000012ipzPAAQ [function] => Co-Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Michael Sams [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Sams [title] => Incident Management and Preparedness Advisor [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard 8th District [bio] => In June 2012, Michael Sams became the inaugural Incident Management & Preparedness Advisor for the Eighth Coast Guard District located in New Orleans, LA. Mr. Sams serves as the District's lead expert on Coast Guard operations and connectivity under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and the National Response Framework (NRF). He serves as the link between the District and the regional intergovernmental response community, as a deployable response resource coordinator, and as a technical advisor to the District Commander. Mr. Sams is responsible for integrating Coast Guard plans with the regional intergovernmental operating plans. He is also responsible for ensuring that the preparedness cycle of planning, training, exercising, evaluating, and revising is continually implemented. Mr. Sams serves as the Co-Chair of the Region 6, 7, and 8 Regional Response Teams, and is the Regional Chair for Mexico/United States Joint Response Team. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078y6KAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T15:03:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdvZEAT [contactid] => 003C000001YsrdiIAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Testing the Flexibility of ICS; Incorporating Environmental Data Management into its Own Unit Under the Planning Section [abstract] => [name] => James McCormack M.S.E.S., M.P.A., CHMM [salutation] => [firstname] => James [lastname] => McCormack [title] => Director, Sales and Marketing [suffix] => M.S.E.S., M.P.A., CHMM [company] => CTEH, LLC [bio] => Mr. McCormack has been an environmental consultant since 2002, participating in the response, mitigation, monitoring, sampling, and closure of hundreds of releases within the petroleum, chemical, manufacturing, and rail transportation sec-tors since during that time. Proficiencies and experience include environmental compliance and emergency and environmental response, including knowledge of relevant state and federal environmental statutes and regulations; preparing and submitting facility-specific environmental permits; performing environmental assessments; developing pollution control and environmental emergency response plans; operating within the Incident Command System (ICS) in the Environmental Unit during emergencies, as well as, regulatory required drills and exercises; and sampling and monitoring using scientifically accepted methodology for purposes of litigation support and assisting regulators, clients, and emergency response personnel make decisions based on sound science. Mr. McCormack has a Master's of Science Environmental Science and a Master of Public Affairs from Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, as well as a Bachelors of Science in Life Science from the University of Missouri at Rolla. Mr. McCormack has been with CTEH since 2005. Mr. McCormack presently resides in Bloomington, Indiana with his 3 wonderful children and loving and supporting wife. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001AeHulMAFw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABmlzEAD [contactid] => 003C000001nfU2rIAE [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Managing Environmental Data Within Response [abstract] => [name] => Buzz Martin [salutation] => [firstname] => Buzz [lastname] => Martin [title] => Environmental Scientist/Response Specialist [suffix] => PhD [company] => Shell Exploration & Production Company [bio] => Buzz Martin, PhD., is an Emergency Response Specialist and Environmental Scientist with Shell Emergency Management. He is Houston-based, but currently spends half of his time in Mexico City supporting HSSE plan development for Shell's Mexico Venture. He has been with Shell for seven and a half years as an SME in trajectory modelling, remote sensing and Environmental Unit leadership. He has extensive experience with international exercise development, shoreline cleanup assessment, contract development and Shell's governance process (Control Framework). Prior to joining Shell, he was the State Scientific Support Coordinator for the Texas General Land Office's oil spill program from 1992 to 2012. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078xQ4AAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-06T14:34:12Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdwBEAT [contactid] => 003C000001nfUAiIAM [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => NOAA's Role and Progress in Environmental Data Management [abstract] => [name] => George Graettinger [salutation] => Co-Author [firstname] => George [lastname] => Graettinger [title] => Environmental Scientist [suffix] => [company] => NOAA Office of Response and Restoration [bio] => George Graettinger is an environmental scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) in Seattle, WA. George is a Senior GIS Project Manager for the Assessment and Restoration Division with over 30 years' experience in remediation, natural resource damage assessment, data analysis, remote sensing, as well as the development of GIS based decision support systems. George is the Gulf of Mexico Regional lead for the Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA). Regional ERMA sites have been deployed across the US and the Gulf site served as the Common Operational Picture (COP) for the Deepwater Horizon spill. Prior to coming to OR&R George worked with the US Environmental Protection Agency developing decision support systems for contaminant waste sites throughout the Great Lakes. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T18:45:46Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdwLEAT [contactid] => 003C000001JxZjNIAV [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Environmental Data Management - A State's Perspective [abstract] => [name] => Gina M. Saizan [salutation] => [firstname] => Gina [lastname] => Saizan [title] => Natural Resource Damage Assessment Manager [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => Gina Muhs Saizan is the Damage Assessment Program Manager with the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office. Prior to LOSCO she worked as a responder with the Texas General Land Office and in private consulting for the oil and gas industry. Ms. Saizan has over 25 years of experience in oil spill response and natural resource management. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001NnzKOMAZw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-04T21:39:55Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) [6] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdvKEAT [contactid] => 0038000000rReopAAC [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => National Level Perspective - Advancing Environmental Data Management [abstract] => [name] => Nancy Kinner Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Nancy [lastname] => Kinner [title] => Director [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Coastal Response Research Center [bio] => Nancy Kinner is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at UNH. She has been UNH director of the Coastal Response Research Center, a partnership between UNH and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and director of the Center for Spills in the Environment since 2004. The centers (www.crrc.unh.edu) bring together the resources of a research-oriented university and the field expertise of NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration to conduct and oversee basic and applied research, conduct outreach, and encourage strategic partnerships in spill response, assessment and restoration. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-18T18:09:50Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 7 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-07T18:45:46Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
5F: The Evolution of the Response Community and the Challenges of a Maturing Industry and Workforce
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560OaEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00 [name] => 5F: The Evolution of the Response Community and the Challenges of a Maturing Industry and Workforce [room] => 266 [notes] => Add as panelists: Robert Simmons, Jackie Smith, USCG rep, Devon Grennan [abstract] =>

This session will cover a variety of topics: the evolution of incident management, OSRO’s and clean up contractors, consultants, salvors, and loss of expertise due to a retiring workforce. Other topics to be discussed could include how is an incident managed, are field operations efficient, what do regulations supply/provide, or how do we get our swagger back?

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6QEAW [name] => Track 5: Response/Restoration ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgO0EAI [contactid] => 003C00000178xgGIAQ [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Robert Chambers [salutation] => [firstname] => Robert [lastname] => Chambers [title] => Sr. VP ERMS [suffix] => [company] => Global Risk Solutions [bio] => Robert E. Chambers is the Senior Vice President of Environmental Risk Management Solutions for Global Risk Solutions, Inc. (GRS) partnering with clients who have exposure to environmental impairment incidents in order to help them prepare for, manage and mitigate claims, costs and liabilities and to recover costs arising from such events. GRS provides resource tracking, time keeping, and cost control in incident response as executives, stakeholders and government agencies will want to know what resources are available, where they are located and what they cost and claims management technology with cutting edge cloud based database solutions offering real time insight into the claims process as well as automated notifications and reporting customized to each client. With more than twenty-five years experience in the environmental and emergency response industry his experience includes emergency response and crisis management, environmental regulatory analysis and compliance, contingency and emergency response planning and preparedness, community awareness, and training. He has been involved in the management of more than 700 incidents involving oil and hazardous materials releases and natural disasters. Mr. Chambers serves as a board member of the Spill Control Association of America and currently elected President. He is an Environmental Professional Certified, Certified Environmental Specialist, Manager, & Consultant and Participates in American Petroleum Institute's Spills Advisory Group. A member of the Propeller Club of Gulfport. He has also served as a member of the Delaware County Chemical Advisory Team, Local Emergency Planning Committees in Florida, Pennsylvania, and Mississippi, National and Florida Association of Environmental Professionals, Jacksonville Disaster Preparedness Committee, Jacksonville Freeway Management Team, and other environmental and emergency response initiatives. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078PC0AAMw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-15T19:45:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgOAEAY [contactid] => 003C000001p8lXwIAI [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Lawrence Malizzi [salutation] => [firstname] => Lawrence [lastname] => Malizzi [title] => Senior Manager [suffix] => [company] => OBG Part of Ramboll [bio] => Mr. Malizzi has 29 years of experience in business development, litigation support, spill planning, drills, and response, Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), endangered species, and habitat restoration. Currently, he is managing work on the Bayport Channel Collision. Recently, he was a SCAT Team Lead on the Dublin Express response and he managed the OBG staff on the ITC Fire response, Hurricane's Florence, and Michael responses. Previously, he managed the OBG staff on the Bay Long response in Grand Isle, LA, the Avian Influenza response in Iowa, and was a SCAT Team Lead on the Bayonne 2015 spill response in Bayonne, NJ. Mr. Malizzi also managed staff on the Exxon Mayflower, Hurricane Isaac, Superstorm Sandy, Boston 30, and Texas City "Y" responses. He served as the Program Manager for the Natural Resource Advisor Program, among other tasks, in support of the MC252 Deepwater Horizon Response (BP Spill) in the Gulf of Mexico. Mr. Malizzi has been on the Board Secretary for the Spill Control Association of America, is on the Clean Gulf Planning Committee, and is on the Planning Committee for the International Oil Spill Conference 2020. He has spoken extensively on spill planning, NRDA, and response and other environmental topics in both the U.S., Canada, Middle East, and EU. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000kyYdlMAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lWryMAE [contactid] => 003C000002G34RmIAJ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => March 24, 1989 marked the beginning of crisis management and response, as we know it, with the M/T Exxon Valdez grounding and subsequent spill which resulted in an industry changing and sweeping law: "OPA '90". It most certainly was not the beginning of environmental legislation but, rather, stands as a hallmark in time when environmental standards in the United States (U.S.) rose in importance to aggressively and swiftly enforce requirements on the petroleum industry in the form of vessels, pipelines, and facilities. The U.S. was experiencing a growing dependence on oil and, subsequently oil movement into and throughout America rose. However, environmental regulations and preparedness were slow to keep up with the increased volume of oil trade and the environmental impact of similar potential incidents to that of M/T Exxon Valdez. Consequently, our country lacked the ability to respond to what was an inevitable scenario given the growing demand of oil against the lack of environmental requirements: training and resources to mitigate the next catastrophic oil spill. OPA '90 was necessary. As a result of the passing of OPA '90, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) enjoyed a new source of funding to enforce these new regulations. However, considering these new requirements & the timeframe for them to take effect (i.e. mitigate oil spills), incidents continued to occur resulting in responders (Incident Management Teams, OSROs, SMFFs, regulators, etc.) to be continually trained in response thus enabling them to continue to remain highly qualified in understanding "Incident Management", response, application of hard assets (boom, skimmers, etc.), and an understanding of the mission and responsibilities for following the true intention of OPA '90. As OPA '90, SMS, & other conventions have shaped & improved industry, the frequency of incidents has been reduced. Consequently, so has the response community's level of experience. Incidents are no longer managed by the concept of responding to & mitigating an incident. Rather, regulatory entities have reduced the definition of "response" to the ability of an IMT to produce ICS forms, an IAP, etc. Efficiencies of field operations have been placed on the back burner. Regulatory training is no longer focused on a response "entity's" ability to mitigate an incident (per OPA '90), it is focused on training credentials having little to no bearing on incident mitigation...the true intention of OPA' 90. Our industry needs to refocus on our common goal of being environmental stewards; not plan/paper producing managers. This paper & suggested panel to address this subject at Clean Gulf is intended to begin that process of bringing emphasis on mitigation of incidents and refocusing on the true intent of OPA 90. [name] => Thomas Wiker [salutation] => [firstname] => Thomas [lastname] => Wiker [title] => Vice President - Operations [suffix] => [company] => Gallagher Marine Systems [bio] => THOMAS J. WIKER Vice President - Operations Gallagher Marine Systems (GMS) Tom, who holds a Bachelor of Science from Rutgers State University, was a member of the U.S. Coast Guard where he sailed on two, 378' Cutters followed by tours at U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Headquarters in Washington D.C. and Marine Safety Office Philadelphia as a Port State Control Inspector. Upon departing the USCG, Tom entered into the Qualified Individual/Incident Management Team (QI/IMT) field where he has been for over 22 years of which over 19 have been with Gallagher Marine Systems (GMS). Tom has extensive response experience having been involved in management of numerous incident responses in his QI and USCG careers. As a QI/IMT member, he has been involved in all levels of incident response working for Facilities/Terminals, Pipelines, Ship Owner/Operators and P&I Clubs in response to fixed facility & pipeline releases, vessel groundings & collisions and various other types of incidents. He has acted in many capacities such as Incident Commander, Operations Section Chief, Logistics Section Chief, Field Supervisor and more for incidents in many locations throughout Canada and the U.S. East, Gulf and West coasts. He was most recently acting as Deputy Incident Commander for an ongoing pipeline release in the port of New York as well as Incident Commander for a bunker spill in New Orleans along the Mississippi River in May of 2018. As Vice President of Operations for GMS, Tom has oversight of the GMS Drill & Training Department; Vessel/Facility Contingency Plan Department; and the Incident Management Team (IMT)Response Services Department. He is an IMT member and continues to travel worldwide to perform regulatory seminars, senior management & seafarer training, proctoring of Table Top Exercises, customer relations, panel discussion/presentations and more. He has participated in several design teams for planning Area Exercises and similar industry-led exercises where he has worked with the U.S. Coast Guard, oil majors, FBI, NOAA, state & local agencies, ship owner/operators, P&I Clubs, SMFF & OSRO providers, etc. Tom has also been invited to speak on several maritime/environmental panels some examples include: • Athens, Greece: \\\\\\\"Regulatory Trends in the United States: A focus on prevention and preparedness for shipowners\\\\\\\" at the British Hellenic/ Chamber of Shipping\\\\\\\'s \\\\\\\"Shipping Today & Tomorrow\\\\\\\" Conference. • Portland, Oregon: \\\\\\\"Balancing Response Operations with Safety, the Environment, and Commerce\\\\\\\" at the International Oil Spill Conference. • Stamford, Connecticut: Connecticut Maritime Association (CMA) "A practical review of regulatory developments in China, the Panama Canal and Argentina and how they affect and apply to shipowners trading there" at the Connecticut Maritime Association's North American Shipping & Trade Exposition. • Washington, D.C.: "The PREP program and its effect on SMFF in the US" at the American Salvage Association's National Maritime Salvage Conference & Expo - Weathering the Storm". • Jekyll Island, Georgia: Georgia Environmental Conference. "Emergency Response: Managing Liabilities During the Initial Response To A Hazardous Material Release" • Yorktown, Virginia: Tom regularly provides lectures to Senior USCG personnel, who are or will fill Captain of the Port roles, each year at the U.S. Coast Guard's leadership course (OSC Crisis Management Course - USCG Marine Safety School) along with an industry perspective to the USCG's Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSCR) course. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-18T16:55:28Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AETA9EAP [contactid] => 0038000000ZQqaUAAT [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Robert Simmons PE [salutation] => [firstname] => Robert [lastname] => Simmons [title] => President [suffix] => PE [company] => Environmental Science Services [bio] => Robert Simmons is a registered Professional Engineer in Mechanical and Environmental engineering in Louisiana. He is the President and a Principal of Environmental Science Services, Inc. (Es²). Es² is an environmental consulting firm specializing in GIS/Mapping, oil spill response and Environmental Unit management and support including drills, NRDA, SCAT and Spill Management. He is retained by the Water Quality Insurance Syndicate as a Principal Surveyor and Consultant and spill Manager. Robert has over 30 years of oil industry and spill response experience, and has been involved in the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill response, the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill response, and over 400 others in between and after. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001MzBV5MANw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-18T21:24:28Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AETCKEA5 [contactid] => 003C000002OBz82IAD [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => John Temperilli [salutation] => [firstname] => John [lastname] => Temperilli [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => KSolv, Garner, OMI [bio] => John Temperilli is a Senior Crisis Management Professional with broad crisis management leadership and advisory experience in successful international and domestic crisis response. He has successfully responded and managed large scale Stafford Act events with numerous state and federal agencies, and numerous NCP (National Contingency Plan) Emergency events with EPA, USCG and relevant state agencies. He has spearheaded planning and gap analysis on a national catastrophic level. He has conducted training and exercises internationally in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and South America. He has been a program and project manager in the private sector for over 30 years. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001DrV2TMAVw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-15T18:33:06Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AETCjEAP [contactid] => 0038000000rRenQAAS [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Devon Grennan [salutation] => [firstname] => Devon [lastname] => Grennan [title] => Senior Vice President [suffix] => [company] => Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. [bio] => Mr. Grennan joined Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. in 1995 and grew up in the business by serving in a variety of roles including Marine Environmental Supervisor, Environmental Manager and General Manager. He was appointed President in 2009 and added the title of Chief Executive Officer in 2013. With Moran Environmental Recovery's (MER) purchase of Global in early 2019, he remains President or Global, and is also Senior Vice President of MER, and serves on MER's Executive Committee. His passion is looking for ways to introduce younger generations to the maritime industry, and he is proud to continue his family's history of working on the water. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Washington, and is an active member of Vistage. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000bYwJtMAKw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-19T14:12:49Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) [6] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mqj1EAA [contactid] => 003C000001P85T0IAJ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Shawn Essert [salutation] => [firstname] => Shawn [lastname] => Essert [title] => Emergency Response Manager [suffix] => [company] => Shell Exploration & Production Company [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-08-15T18:33:59Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 7 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-09-23T16:44:36Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
6F: Unified Command Development
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560PEEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00 [name] => 6F: Unified Command Development [room] => 267 [notes] => ADD Bryant Smalley, TGLO (who), Capt Hawes or Capt. Jason Smith USCG, Jennifer Crouch BHP and Michael Baccigalopi [abstract] =>

This session will include discussion on the development of Unified Command. It will focus on Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSC), State On-Scene Coordinator (SOSC), and Responsible Party Incident Command (RPIC) development. 

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6iEAG [name] => Track 6: Training and Exercise Best Management Practices ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgZyEAI [contactid] => 003C000001hSvClIAK [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Lisa Saint [salutation] => [firstname] => Lisa [lastname] => Saint [title] => HSSE & ER Advisor [suffix] => [company] => BP Shipping [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdNtEAL [contactid] => 003C000001JxRI7IAN [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Capt. Jason E. Smith [salutation] => Capt. [firstname] => Jason [lastname] => Smith [title] => Deputy Sector Commander [suffix] => [company] => Coast Guard Sector / Air Station Corpus Christi [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdQ4EAL [contactid] => 003C000001P85ZFIAZ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bryant Smalley [salutation] => [firstname] => Bryant [lastname] => Smalley [title] => Oil Spill & Response Team Leader and Federal On-Scene Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => U.S. EPA, Region 6 [bio] => Bryant Smalley began his career at EPA as an Inspector in Region 6. He has conducted and overseen hundreds of compliance inspections throughout the years. Since 2010, he has served as a Federal On-Scene Coordinator, overseeing the cleanup of oil spills and chemical releases. Currently he is the lead for the Oil Spill & Response Team, implementing both the oil spill prevention and response program in EPA Region 6. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdQYEA1 [contactid] => 003C000001GyNn9IAF [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Brent Koza [salutation] => [firstname] => Brent [lastname] => Koza [title] => Corpus Christi Regional Manager [suffix] => [company] => Texas General Land Office [bio] => Brent has worked for the Texas General Land Office (GLO) - Oil Spill Prevention and Response Division since 2005. Brent's focus includes contingency planning and oil spill response operations. Prior to working at the GLO, Brent worked as a biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Geological Survey, The Nature Conservancy, and the Center for Coastal Studies at Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi. Brent graduated with a Master of Science Degree from Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi in 2006. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078Q8TAAUw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-16T19:00:59Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdanEAD [contactid] => 003C000001hSuyuIAC [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Barbara Parker [salutation] => [firstname] => Barbara [lastname] => Parker [title] => EM Science and Advocacy Manager - PTS Emergency Mgmt [suffix] => [company] => Shell Exploration & Production Company [bio] => Hello All! For those that don't know me, I am the Response Science and Advocacy Manager with Shell Emergency Management, a global all hazards response organization within Shell Oil Company. My team works within Shell to help our assets be prepared for incidences through training and exercises and works with our stakeholders to let them know how we respond to emergencies at Shell. We work closely with all levels of governments in our operating areas to ensure we are compliant with regulations and to help increase the scientific knowledge around emergency management in those regions. I have over 25 years of experience planning for, responding to, managing and leading teams during emergency incidences. I lead Shell's ICS Skill Pool Development program that focuses on mentors from our team developing the competency of our Shell Americas Response Team. I lead the planning and delivery of select WCD exercises and often am our IC in exercises in the US. I held the role of US Vice Chair of the IOGP Arctic Response Technology JIP for its last two years and was also the Chair of the In Situ Burn workgroup. Within Shell I led our arctic response development team looking at ways to respond to emergencies in all ice types. I recently became the API, Oil Spill and Emergency Preparedness for Response Vice Chair for Communications and Outreach. I am a member of the Clean Gulf and Clean Pacific Coordination Committees and the IOSC 2020 Planning Committee. I began my emergency response career as a field level oil and hazardous materials emergency responder at the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, I progressed through the agency and for my last 7 years at Maine DEP I was the Director for Maine's 32-member State Oil and Hazardous Materials Response Team, in this capacity I was the co-chair of the Maine/New Hampshire Area Committee and a member of RRT 1. In 2010 I was selected by the US Coast Guard to be a member of the BP Deepwater Horizon Incident Specific Preparedness Review (ISPR) team. In 2012 I joined Shell's Emergency Management Team in Houston. Please find me and come say hello and let me know if you have any questions about Shell Emergency Management. Have a great conference! [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001Nl5cYMARw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABdRHEA1 [contactid] => 003C000001iHnCRIA0 [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Jennifer Crouch [salutation] => [firstname] => Jennifer [lastname] => Crouch [title] => Principal CEM & Security - GOM [suffix] => [company] => BHP Billiton [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-18T16:13:54Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-09-23T16:50:11Z )
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
8F: Generating and Interpreting Toxicity Information for Decision -Making
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560KdEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T18:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T20:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T13:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00 [name] => 8F: Generating and Interpreting Toxicity Information for Decision -Making [room] => 268 [notes] => Add - Lab Protocols, Gina Coelho, Realistic Exposure Chemistry, tom Parkerton, Interpreting toxicity data, Adriana Bejarano, End user Perspective, Paige Doelling [abstract] =>

This session will evaluate challenges and best practices in laboratory testing of dispersed oil toxicity and interpretation of results for dispersants decision-making.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6PEAW [name] => Track 8: Applied Response Techniques ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jbPbEAI [contactid] => 003C000001OTJhDIAX [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Victoria Broje PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Victoria [lastname] => Broje [title] => Sr. Emergency Response Scientist [suffix] => PhD [company] => Shell Projects & Technology [bio] => Dr. Victoria Broje is an internationally recognized specialist with 20 years of experience in scientific and environmental aspects of oil spill response, research projects management, and communication of science to public. She supports Shell businesses worldwide as a Subject Matter Expert in spill response, environmental impacts assessment, and contingency planning. She Leads Environmental Unit network and trains Shell environmental staff to support spill responses and damage assessments globally. Dr. Broje serves on a number of international boards and committees such as API, IOGP and IPIECA, developing best practices for oil spill response. She is a Chair of the Board for the Clean Caribbean and Americas, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and outreach on spill response topics. She also leads the API Science and Technology Working Group managing joint industry research projects on oil spill response and environmental impacts. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077XdqAAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-01T15:39:18Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jbPgEAI [contactid] => 0038000000rRek9AAC [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bradford Benggio [salutation] => [firstname] => Bradford [lastname] => Benggio [title] => Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => NOAA - Office of Response & Restoration [bio] => Bradford Benggio has been the NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator for USCG District Seven since 1992. Since that time, he has responded to hundreds of pollution and other emergency events, both real and as a participant in exercises. He served as an officer in NOAA's Commissioned Corps where he had a very scientific and operational career focus. He brings with him the experience provided by nearly 40 years of work for NOAA and in scientific response and contingency planning activities. He has authored over 30 papers, technical reports, and conference presentations and regularly trains USCG, EPA, state, other federal agencies, and industry personnel on many aspects of pollution response and planning. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000vap2YMAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jmGXEAY [contactid] => 003C00000178wTQIAY [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Aligning Science with Operational Needs: Modernizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Testing Protocols [abstract] => [name] => Gina Coelho Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Gina [lastname] => Coelho [title] => Principal Senior Scientist [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Sponson Group Inc. [bio] => Dr. Gina Coelho has over 25 years' experience in oil spill response. She supported the Marine Spill Response Corporation dispersant R&D program from 1993-1995. Since 1996 she worked as a specialist in the areas of dispersant use, policy, contingency planning and decision-making. She has conducted open ocean oil field trials, mesocosm research and laboratory experiments on the efficacy and biological effects of oil, dispersant, and dispersed oil. She has worked as a facilitator on more than a dozen Ecological Risk Assessments for the US Coast Guard, has authored multiple Spill Impact Mitigation Assessment documents, and has set up three dispersed oil testing facilities (in the US, Brazil, and New Zealand). She served as co-Principal Investigator on two NOAA CRRC funded projects: one to examine life-cycle and multi-generational effects of oil and dispersed oil on a marine organism, and a second project to develop a dispersed oil toxicity database to support dispersant-use decision-making. During the Deepwater Horizon spill, Dr. Coelho facilitated subsea dispersant decisions between BP and Federal and state agencies within the Area Command, and developed SSDI monitoring protocols. In recent years, Dr. Coelho has supported the Joint Industry Task Force (JITF) Subsea Dispersant effort for API, which examined SSDI injection systems, efficacy, fate and effects, modeling and communication. She has been a contributing author on several API Technical Reports and on the IPIECA Subsea Dispersant Good Practice Guide. Dr. Coelho served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences Dispersant Committee (2019 book release) and as a co-author on a GoMRI and C-IMAGE consortia joint effort to produce a two book series on deepwater oil spills (also a 2019 book release). [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001JzVaoMAFw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-14T15:11:49Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jmKFEAY [contactid] => 0038000000dOlEuAAK [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Bridging the Gap between Laboratory Studies and the Real-World: Challenges and a Path Forward [abstract] => [name] => Adriana Bejarano PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Adriana [lastname] => Bejarano [title] => Sr. Ecotoxicologist, Risk Science Team [suffix] => PhD [company] => Shell Health - Americas [bio] => Dr. Adriana C. Bejarano is a senior ecotoxicologist with Shell Health - Americas. She holds a B.A. in Marine Biology from Universidad del Valle, Colombia, and a M.S. in Marine Science and a Ph.D. in Aquatic Toxicology from the University of South Carolina. Dr. Bejarano has experience in applied environmental science, computational toxicology, ecological and environmental predictive modeling, environmental statistics, and applied aquatic eco-toxicology. Her research has focused on studying the toxicological effects of organic pollutants, including oil related products. She also led discussions on the tradeoff of dispersant use, and is also an active member of the oil spill response community. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b000007903rAAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-14T13:03:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jmLmEAI [contactid] => 003C000001YsrfJIAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Use of Science Data in Operational Decision-Making [abstract] => [name] => Paige Doelling Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Paige [lastname] => Doelling [title] => Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => NOAA/NOS/ORR/ERD [bio] => Dr. Paige Doelling has been the NOAA SSC for coastal Louisiana and Texas since late 2013, serving as the principal scientific advisor to the Coast Guard for oil and hazmat spill response and planning in the coastal zone. She has been lead SSC on several major responses, including the Texas City Y oil spill response (2014), the Morgan's Point Collision hazmat spill response (2015), the Green Canyon 248 offshore oil spill response (2016), and Hurricane Harvey (2017) as well as dozens of smaller oil and hazmat responses. She works on science and preparedness issues at the Coast Guard unit, Area Committee (AC), and Regional Response Team (RRT) levels and serves as an instructor for NOAA's Science of Oil Spills (SOS), and Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) classes. Dr. Doelling came to the SSC position with a strong background in ecotoxicology, protected resources, and interagency coordination. In her previous position at National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), she worked on Endangered Species Act (ESA) Section 7 consultations with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on pesticides and water quality issues, and spent a year at NOAA Headquarters as a Fishery Policy Advisor, working on national-level fisheries policy issues. She has worked for several Federal agencies, including EPA, where she wrote ecological risk assessments for pesticides; and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) Chesapeake Bay Field Office, where she did stream assessment and restoration, and worked on a range of contaminant issues. Her dissertation focused on the trophic transfer of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in an estuarine food web. She served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force, providing imagery and targeting support to U.S. troops during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm, reaching the rank of Captain (O-3). Paige later spent several years as a defense consultant working with imagery-based products and information. She holds a PhD in Environmental Science and Public Policy, an MA in International Transactions, a BS in Biochemistry, and a First-Degree Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. When not at work, she is likely to be found at the yoga studio, or outside hiking with a black Labrador. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000UMrjHMATw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-02T18:43:52Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-14T15:11:49Z )
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnCIEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T20:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T20:30:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T15:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T15:30:00 [name] => Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-06-05T16:41:46Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
2G: Preparing Your Leadership Team to Manage Crisis
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560LHEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T17:00:00 [name] => 2G: Preparing Your Leadership Team to Manage Crisis [room] => 262 [notes] => ADD - Managing Crisis Coms, Sean Fitzgerald, Managing Stakeholder Engagement, TBD, Crisis Management vs Incident Response, TBD [abstract] =>

In this session the speakers will define the difference between crisis response and incident response, using best practices and sharing their experience through case studies. High performance leadership focusing on critical crisis issues and not the tactical response will be highlighted. Managing the crisis, managing the messaging, and effective stakeholder engagement will also be addressed.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcaUEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001I6YpDIAV [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Bob Patterson [salutation] => [firstname] => Bob [lastname] => Patterson [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => Witt O'Brien's [bio] => Bob is Managing Director at Witt O'Brien's and oversees the 225+ PetroChem response management and consulting relationships for Witt O'Brien's. Bob has 35 years' experience in risk management and operations best practices for the Oil & Gas, manufacturing and financial industries. His experience involves Crisis Management, Incident management, and Emergency Response. During his tenure at Witt O'Brien's, Bob has facilitated, coached or participated in over 500 incidents, exercises and/or training sessions for his PetroChem clients. Bob has a BS in Business from Bryant College, and an MBA in Business from The University of Georgia. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001NnhMfMAJw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcaeEAA [contactid] => 00380000012ipx4AAA [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Rex Anderson [salutation] => [firstname] => Rex [lastname] => Anderson [title] => Senior Emergency Management Specialist [suffix] => [company] => TC Energy [bio] => Rex Anderson has over 20 years in the Oil/Gas/Energy industry working for TC Energy, (formerly TransCanada), BP, Conoco,/ConocoPhillips, and Vice President of HSE/Security/Crisis Management for Energy XXI. His expertise has been concentrated in Executive and Crisis Management Team preparedness and response, and he has directly responsible for the preparation, training and facilitation of Senior level leadership teams to ensure they stay strategic in nature, and allow Field IMTs to handle operations and tactics during response activities. Rex has been involved in support and response activities for major international incident responses at BP and TC Energy, and continues to develop response plans, exercises, and real world preparation for all C-Suite leaders. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000019wi1oMAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-30T21:15:55Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mBD9EAM [contactid] => 003C000002OBzBrIAL [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Crisis Management vs. Incident Response [abstract] => [name] => Gil Martinez [salutation] => [firstname] => Gil [lastname] => Martinez [title] => Sr. Emergency Response Specialist [suffix] => [company] => Murphy Oil Company Ltd. [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-08T22:12:03Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lWtLMAU [contactid] => 00380000012ipx4AAA [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Executive Crisis Management Team Response [abstract] => Introducing real-life strategic crisis issues that can result from any level of field incident, and options to deal with them. Focus will be on preparation, plan composition (think Quick Reference Guides, not huge binders of documentation), real-life scenarios to Drill your team and Exercise your plan, and then confidence and support in a response environment. We will discuss tried and true strategies that have benefited several super-major companies deal with internationally sensitive incidents. [name] => Rex Anderson [salutation] => [firstname] => Rex [lastname] => Anderson [title] => Senior Emergency Management Specialist [suffix] => [company] => TC Energy [bio] => Rex Anderson has over 20 years in the Oil/Gas/Energy industry working for TC Energy, (formerly TransCanada), BP, Conoco,/ConocoPhillips, and Vice President of HSE/Security/Crisis Management for Energy XXI. His expertise has been concentrated in Executive and Crisis Management Team preparedness and response, and he has directly responsible for the preparation, training and facilitation of Senior level leadership teams to ensure they stay strategic in nature, and allow Field IMTs to handle operations and tactics during response activities. Rex has been involved in support and response activities for major international incident responses at BP and TC Energy, and continues to develop response plans, exercises, and real world preparation for all C-Suite leaders. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000019wi1oMAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-09T18:55:38Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mBCzEAM [contactid] => 003C000002OBzOAIA1 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Managing Crisis Communication [abstract] => [name] => Grace Burley [salutation] => [firstname] => Grace [lastname] => Burley [title] => Managing Director [suffix] => [company] => Witt O'Brien's [bio] => Grace has nearly two decades of experience in the crisis management industry. She has managed comprehensive planning, training, and exercise programs for companies and organizations in various industries. She has received her business continuity certification from Business Continuity Institute. Her strength is developing customized preparedness programs that effectively integrate: • Crisis Management • Business Continuity • Emergency Management • Crisis Communications • Human Impact/People Support/Workplace Violence • IT Disaster Recovery [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b00000790K4AAIw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-09T16:08:19Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-09T18:55:38Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
4G: Deepwater Ports - Current and Future Impacts
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560L7EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T17:00:00 [name] => 4G: Deepwater Ports - Current and Future Impacts [room] => 265 [notes] => Our 4th speaker, either a MARAD or LOOP rep, still pend. [abstract] =>

The demand for crude oil export facilities exceeds current capacity. Several initiatives are underway to close this export procession capacity gap. This session will provide an overview of deepwater port permitting and approval process as well as address potential impacts to existing oil pollution planning, preparedness, and response protocols.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6dEAG [name] => Track 4: Emerging Trends and Concerns ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcAcEAI [contactid] => 003C000002G32FqIAJ [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Capt. Jason Smith [salutation] => [firstname] => Jason [lastname] => Smith [title] => Deputy Sector/Air Station Commander [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard Sector Corpus Christi [bio] => Captain Jason E. Smith is currently assigned as the Deputy Sector Commander of Coast Guard Sector / Air Station Corpus Christi. In this position, he serves as the Alternate Captain of the Port and Federal On-Scene Coordinator for South Texas. Throughout his career, CAPT Smith has held numerous field and staff assignments specializing in marine safety, coastal security, and environmental compliance. He most recently served as the Detachment Chief for the Coast Guard's Liquefied Gas Carrier National Center of Expertise where he supervises a team of liquefied gas subject matter experts who provide technical advice to both the industry and the Coast Guard on the liquefied gas industry. CAPT Smith's previous assignments include Chief of Prevention at Sector Boston where he oversaw a 75 personnel department, at Coast Guard Headquarters' Directorate for Commercial Regulations and Standards where he worked as the US's liaison to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), and field assignments at the Marine Inspection Office Europe, Rotterdam; Detached Duty Office North Bend, Oregon; Marine Safety Office Puget Sound, Washington; and Marine Safety Detachment Bangor, Maine. CAPT Smith has been involved in numerous real world spill responses and exercises. Of note he was Federal On Scene Coordinator for the Bouchard Barge 225 spill in Corpus Christi Texas and the New Carissa spill in North Bend Oregon. Additionally he has spoken at hundreds of trade conferences and was a presenter for the National Response Team speaker series. CAPT Smith's personal awards include two Coast Guard Meritorious Service Medals, four Coast Guard Commendation Medals, a Coast Guard Achievement Medal, the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, and other unit and team awards. Originally from Pelham, New Hampshire, CAPT Smith is a 1996 graduate of Maine Maritime Academy with a B.S in Marine Transportation and a 2007 graduate of the University of Maryland's A. James Clark School of Engineering with a M.S. in Systems Engineering and Reliability/Risk Engineering. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-09-26T16:41:47Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019mFqBEAU [contactid] => 0033b00002SoOxQAAV [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => National Deepwater Port Regulatory Overview [abstract] => [name] => Linden Houston [salutation] => [firstname] => Linden [lastname] => Houston [title] => Transportation Specialist [suffix] => [company] => U.S. DOT, Maritime Administration [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-01T22:11:22Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019laazMAA [contactid] => 003C000001snapSIAQ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => A Discussion of Regulatory Processes for Deepwater Port Development in Texas [abstract] => The Deepwater Port Act of 1974 created a regulatory framework for construction and operation of deepwater ports located beyond U.S. territorial sea. Initially designed to develop oil imports to the U.S., the law was amended in 2002 to include ability to import natural gas and again in 2012 to allow for natural gas export. In 2016, existing restrictions on domestic oil exports were repealed to allow for the export of U.S. crude oil. The 2016 changes substantially enhanced interest in development of deepwater ports. The Maritime Administration (MARAD) is the federal agency charged with administering the Deepwater Port Act. MARAD works with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) to review deepwater port applications and coordinates with both federal and state regulatory entities. MARAD's role includes ensuring applicants meet financial requirements. The USCG evaluates environmental and navigational aspects to ensure compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act. Other federal agencies involved in licensing include the Department of Energy, Pipeline and Hazardous Material Administration/Department of Transportation, and Environmental Protection Agency, among many. States also have regulatory capacity over deepwater port projects. States designated as "adjacent coastal states" have review and approval authority over deepwater port applications; many have enacted laws corresponding with the federal Deepwater Port Act. To date, MARAD has received 22 deepwater port licensure applications. Ten applications have been approved; seven licenses have been issued and three facilities are operational. Two of the operating facilities are natural gas facilities; Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) is the only deepwater port oil terminal within the U.S. As of late February, the State of Texas has received two applications for license. Additional applications are expected to be forthcoming. The repeal of regulations prohibiting domestic crude oil export combined with increased production from shale development has increased interest in the construction and operation of deepwater ports. This presentation will discuss the regulatory approval process, including federal and state perspectives, and expectations for future deepwater port development. [name] => D'Anne Stites [salutation] => [firstname] => D'Anne [lastname] => Stites [title] => Compliance and Enforcement Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => Texas General Land Office [bio] => D'Anne began her state career at the Texas Capitol in 1995, coordinating legislation and developing policy in both the Texas Senate and Texas House of Representatives. After leaving the capitol, she worked in Governmental Relations for the Texas Dept. of Agriculture, where she focused on rural economic development, commodity regulation and ag marketing. A 2007 move to the Land Office brought her to the GLO Communications Division, and seven years later, D'Anne had the opportunity to move to the best division in the entire agency, Oil Spill Prevention and Response where she coordinates Oil Spill's compliance and enforcement efforts. Although you won't see it on her business cards, her title is The Spiller Biller. D'Anne has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art from Oklahoma State University and a Master of Public Administration from Texas State University. She is a mom to four and enjoys running and kayaking. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-08T03:12:05Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AByGkEAL [contactid] => 003C000001JXnYXIA1 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => A Deepwater Port's Emergency Management and Preparedness Program [abstract] => [name] => Stephen Pepper [salutation] => [firstname] => Stephen [lastname] => Pepper [title] => Director, Crisis Management [suffix] => [company] => Phillips 66 [bio] => Stephen Pepper is the Director, Crisis Management for Phillips 66. An emergency management professional, Steve has more than 30 years of experience in a variety of health, safety, and emergency response roles. He began his career serving in the USMC infantry from 1984-1988. Upon his Honorable Discharge from the Marine Corps he began working in the oil and gas sector where he has held a number of positions of increasing responsibility in the petro-chemicals, refining, midstream, and upstream environments. Stephen was born in Golden Colorado and has completed undergraduate degrees in Emergency Management Administration from West Texas A&M University and Safety Management from University of Alaska. He has also graduated from Texas A&M University with an MS in Adult Education and currently completing his coursework for a PhD in Fire and Emergency Management at Oklahoma State University. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001HwtNjMAJw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-03T19:05:21Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcIQMAY [contactid] => 003C000001hSvBZIA0 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Offshore Crude Oil Exports; Are We Ready to Respond [abstract] => The US began exporting crude oil in 2016 after the ban on exports was lifted and ever since, US production and exports keep hitting new highs. While there are many facilities throughout the Gulf Coast that can support crude oil exports there are currently no inland ports that can fully load the 2 million barrel Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCC) needed to take full advantage of the countries new export capacity. Currently much of this export market is managed with smaller tankers shipping crude oil directly to foreign ports while other operations utilize lightering vessels to load VLCC's offshore via ship-to-ship transfers or partially load VLCCs at inland facilities and complete their load offshore with lightening vessels. Recognizing the need for more efficient crude oil export operations, several projects have been proposed utilizing the Deep Water Port Act of 1974 [As Amended Through. P.L. 108-59, July 14, 2003] to export crude while promoting efficiency in transportation and protecting the environment. As much of this work is being pushed offshore, do we have in place the regulatory authority and resources to protect the coast for an offshore worst-case discharge. This panel of state and federal regulators, oil spill response organizations, and offshore lightering and deep water port project representatives will look at what a crude oil export offshore ship-to-ship or deep water port discharge would look like and discuss the oil spill prevention and response regulations and resources for these types of operations. [name] => Kirk Headley [salutation] => [firstname] => Kirk [lastname] => Headley [title] => President [suffix] => [company] => Oil Stop Division of AMPOL [bio] => Mr. Headley is the Environmental Services Emergency Response President for AMPOL. He has over eighteen (18) years management experience in the emergency spill response and environmental remediation industry. His primary technical experience has focused on emergency spill response, remediation planning and design, and overall project management. Mr. Headley has supervised and managed numerous oil spill response, bioremediation, confined space tank cleaning, NORM survey and remediation, asbestos abatement, lead abatement, and industrial insulation projects throughout the Gulf Coast states. Mr. Headley has been instrumental in providing hazardous materials and hazardous worker training to all emergency spill response personnel at AMPOL. He is also fully certified as a Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) Radiation Safety Officer, and has trained AMPOL employees in this highly specialized field. All training courses conducted by Mr. Headley are fully approved and certified by the region VI and X Environmental Protection Agency. As Project Manager of numerous emergency spill response projects throughout the Gulf States, Mr. Headley has gained valuable experience in the coastal waterways, both on-shore and off-shore, and he is very familiar with the geographical terrain in the area. He has provided the rapid mobilization necessary for emergency response projects in the Gulf Coast Region as well as throughout the United States. Additionally, Mr. Headley has marketed and sold the high quality products and services of AMPOL & Oil Stop throughout the world. He was the 2011 recipient of the Entrepreneur of the Year Gulf Coast Award in the Environmental category at the Gulf Coast Area Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year® Awards. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-02T20:49:51Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-08T03:12:05Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
5G: Case Studies - Lessons Learned
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560NNEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T17:00:00 [name] => 5G: Case Studies - Lessons Learned [room] => 266 [notes] => ADD MC-20 Update ( Sector NOLA); Rattlesnake Bayou (LOSCO); Mississippi River High Water (Sector NOLA) [abstract] =>

Case studies always present an opportunity to reflect upon the realities encountered during an actual response. In this session, several case studies will be presented along with the lessons learned during each event. The lessons learned from such events are critical for assisting responders in better preparing for future incidents.  

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6QEAW [name] => Track 5: Response/Restoration ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgFhEAI [contactid] => 003C000002OByzJIAT [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Frank Paskewich [salutation] => [firstname] => Frank [lastname] => Paskewich [title] => President [suffix] => [company] => Clean Gulf Associates [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEXtwEAH [contactid] => 003C000002Hl6oIIAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Response Efforts at the MC20 Site [abstract] => [name] => Capt. Kristi Luttrell [salutation] => Captain [firstname] => Kristi [lastname] => Luttrell [title] => Sector Commander [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-11T16:03:44Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AC58jEAD [contactid] => 003C00000246JutIAE [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Response Efforts for Hilcorp Energy Well Discharge into Rattlesnake Bayou [abstract] => [name] => Matthew Hollis [salutation] => [firstname] => Matthew [lastname] => Hollis [title] => Environmental Scientist [suffix] => [company] => Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office (LOSCO) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T15:21:42Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEXu6EAH [contactid] => 003C00000246K0BIAU [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Intercontinental Terminals Co. (ITC) Tank Fire and Hazardous Material Release into the Houston Ship Channel [abstract] => [name] => Capt. Kevin Oditt [salutation] => Capt. [firstname] => Kevin [lastname] => Oditt [title] => Sector Commander [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard Sector Houston-Galveston [bio] => [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078fSTAAYw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-09-09T20:45:05Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T16:03:44Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
6G: Training and Developing Key Incident Management Team (IMT) Members
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560P9EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T17:00:00 [name] => 6G: Training and Developing Key Incident Management Team (IMT) Members [room] => 267 [notes] => PREFERENCE WED P.M. ADD Resources Unit (VP of Operations at EMSI (Billy Haley or Ran Cantin). Is there another non-vendor that can be added to balance make up of session? [abstract] =>

Incident Management Team (IMT) success depends on those who fill key positions being able to effectively fill their roles. Building on the experience of the presenters this session will focus on how to develop, train and support those key position holders.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6iEAG [name] => Track 6: Training and Exercise Best Management Practices ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jgZFEAY [contactid] => 003C000001YsrgyIAB [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Art Powers [salutation] => [firstname] => Art [lastname] => Powers [title] => Emergency Preparedness & Response Advisor [suffix] => [company] => ExxonMobil Corporation [bio] => Earned a BS in Marine Transportation from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in 1993. Started with ExxonMobil in, working primarily in the pipeline and fuels distribution affiliates of the company. In 2010 earned a Masters of Science Degree in Emergency Management from the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. In 2014, began current role as an Emergency Preparedness and Response advisor for ExxonMobil's Central SSHE department, with a focus area as the coordinator of the Americas Regional Response Team, which is an all-volunteer reserve force of employees trained to support business lines in the event of a large scale emergency. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001K2IJYMA3w500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-11T16:23:28Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lZVxMAM [contactid] => 003C000001OTJhDIAX [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Environmental Unit Staff Preparedness for Emergency Response [abstract] => Industry makes every effort to prevent emergency situations and ensure that robust response plans are in place to mitigate their potential consequences. Successful emergency response to accidental hydrocarbon spills requires considerable support from environmental specialists. Environmental Unit in the Incident Command System is one of the largest units supporting a wide variety of activities and deliverables, many of which rely on specialized expertise and require completion in a short time frame. As an example, an offshore oil spill may require support and deliverables from specialists in several areas: - Weather forecast, modeling of slick trajectory and oil weathering - Identification of resources at risk and prioritization of protection strategies - Surveillance and remote sensing plans - Evaluation of dispersants and in-situ burning feasibility, development of applications for regulatory approvals, development of monitoring plans, as well as Net Environmental Benefit Analysis or Spill Impact Mitigation Assessment. - Shoreline impact assessment and documentation, selection of treatment strategies, application for the use of surface washing agents, development of cleanup endpoints and monitoring of response efficiency. - Wildlife observations and management plans - Supporting required regulatory consultations - Waste management plans - Decontamination and Decanting plans - Sampling and Natural Resource Damage Assessment data collection - Air modeling and monitoring plans - Environmental advice to Operations - Provision of scientific and environmental information to Joint Information Center and Liaison team Continuously improving safety records and considerable reduction in a number of accidental spills in recent decades reduced number of hands-on training opportunities for environmental staff and required development of tailored training programs to retain and share relevant information. This presentation will describe Environmental Unit staff training program in Shell as well as checklists and guidance documents supporting delivery of environmental unit plans. [name] => Victoria Broje PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Victoria [lastname] => Broje [title] => Sr. Emergency Response Scientist [suffix] => PhD [company] => Shell Projects & Technology [bio] => Dr. Victoria Broje is an internationally recognized specialist with 20 years of experience in scientific and environmental aspects of oil spill response, research projects management, and communication of science to public. She supports Shell businesses worldwide as a Subject Matter Expert in spill response, environmental impacts assessment, and contingency planning. She Leads Environmental Unit network and trains Shell environmental staff to support spill responses and damage assessments globally. Dr. Broje serves on a number of international boards and committees such as API, IOGP and IPIECA, developing best practices for oil spill response. She is a Chair of the Board for the Clean Caribbean and Americas, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and outreach on spill response topics. She also leads the API Science and Technology Working Group managing joint industry research projects on oil spill response and environmental impacts. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077XdqAAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-06T11:12:09Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001ABGiyEAH [contactid] => 003C00000246JbtIAE [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => The Role of the Resources Unit [abstract] => [name] => Billy Haley [salutation] => [firstname] => Billy [lastname] => Haley [title] => Vice President of Operations [suffix] => [company] => EMSI [bio] => Billy Haley is the Vice President of Operations for EMSI where he manages client relations and service delivery for government and private sector clients globally. A member of the EMSI IMT, Billy is a Planning Section Chief, Resources Unit Leader, and Situation Unit Leader. Prior to joining EMSI, Billy spent a decade with the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's (DOE/NNSA) where he managed preparedness and incident management projects for the Office of Nuclear Incident Response, a program Billy and EMSI still support today. Preceding his work with DOE, Billy worked at the FEMA National Integration Center (NIC) during the initial roll of out of National Incident Management System (NIMS). [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:35:58Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcLUMAY [contactid] => 0033b00002SrICPAA3 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Immersive (AR/VR) Technologies to Improve and Transform Emergency Response Training [abstract] => My apologies this is late - I was helping with International Womens Day Celebrations How we deliver and communication site conditions is rapidly changing in this age of digital disruption. GHD is using advanced innovative immersive technologies (AR/VR) to help streamline and transform how the environmental business is training and educating first responders. Emergency Response situations are difficult, expensive and hazardous to recreate, AR/VR offers a new 'experience' for efficient, effective, engaging training, while providing a safe way to provide realistic training environment scenarios for ER training programs. Due to the severity of the duties carried out by ER staff, effective training and preparation is critical to the safety of the entire ER Team. Aviation industry train pilots train using flight simulators to effectively train. The consequence for non standard performance for a pilot is a plane crash, which is catastrophic. So extensive training via simulations are required in a fail safe environment. Can you image if a pilot was trained via a powerpoint? It shouldn't be any different for any industry where safety is important, like Emergency Response. AR/VR training for ER is helping to standardized training by using behavioural reliability matrixes. AR/VR gaming simulations are allowing ER officers to motivate, measure and track behaviour. Improve safety in logistics operations to engage, improve and standardize ER behaviour staff. We will demonstrate 2 Client Case Studies 1) Train Derailment 2) Pipeline Release adjacent to Waterways and how AR/VR technologies are providing a new reality to improve health & safety training and cleanup activities. . [name] => Tom Fewless [salutation] => [firstname] => Tom [lastname] => Fewless [title] => Geologist/Hydrogeologist [suffix] => [company] => GHD Services [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-04T15:37:48Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T16:23:28Z )
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
8G: Dispersants and Oil Spill Response - Overviews of Recent Industry, OSRO, and National Academies Efforts
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560KxEAI [starttime] => 2019-10-30T20:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T22:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T15:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T17:00:00 [name] => 8G: Dispersants and Oil Spill Response - Overviews of Recent Industry, OSRO, and National Academies Efforts [room] => 268 [notes] => Victoria Broje finding 3 additional speakers. [abstract] =>

This session will provide an opportunity to hear about the final outcomes from long term API-sponsored scientific studies on the potential use of dispersants, a summary of the National Academies eagerly anticipated report on the evaluation of dispersant use, and an overview of a model comparing different combinations of response tools for use in a subsea release scenario.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6PEAW [name] => Track 8: Applied Response Techniques ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jc61EAA [contactid] => 003C000002L6xcxIAB [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Tom Coolbaugh, Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Tom [lastname] => Coolbaugh, Ph.D. [title] => Technology and Advocacy Advisor [suffix] => [company] => ExxonMobil Corporation [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jc6BEAQ [contactid] => 00380000012ipzPAAQ [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Michael Sams [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Sams [title] => Incident Management and Preparedness Advisor [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard 8th District [bio] => In June 2012, Michael Sams became the inaugural Incident Management & Preparedness Advisor for the Eighth Coast Guard District located in New Orleans, LA. Mr. Sams serves as the District's lead expert on Coast Guard operations and connectivity under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and the National Response Framework (NRF). He serves as the link between the District and the regional intergovernmental response community, as a deployable response resource coordinator, and as a technical advisor to the District Commander. Mr. Sams is responsible for integrating Coast Guard plans with the regional intergovernmental operating plans. He is also responsible for ensuring that the preparedness cycle of planning, training, exercising, evaluating, and revising is continually implemented. Mr. Sams serves as the Co-Chair of the Region 6, 7, and 8 Regional Response Teams, and is the Regional Chair for Mexico/United States Joint Response Team. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078y6KAAQw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T15:03:09Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jk7HEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001hSvKGIA0 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Overview of National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine 2019 Report on the Evaluation of Dispersants [abstract] => [name] => Stacee Karras [salutation] => [firstname] => Stacee [lastname] => Karras [title] => Program Manager [suffix] => [company] => National Academy of Sciences [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-08T06:51:59Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jk7bEAA [contactid] => 003C000001nfUDDIA2 [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Summary of API-Sponsored Studies of Dispersant Effectiveness [abstract] => [name] => Marty Cramer [salutation] => [firstname] => Marty [lastname] => Cramer [title] => Principal Consultant [suffix] => [company] => Cramer Preparedness and Response, LLC. [bio] => Marty Cramer recently retired after 23 years with ConocoPhillips and is now the Principal Consultant for Cramer Preparedness and Response. He has a master's degree in Environmental Management and has worked in the oil spill preparedness and response, natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) and remediation practice areas for over 42 years. He has been involved in several spill response operations including the Exxon Valdez, Deepwater Horizon and various smaller spills. Marty previously represented ConocoPhillips on API, IPIECA, IOGP and other industry groups for oil spill and emergency response and NRDA issues. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078OkQAAUw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:31:48Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jk7vEAA [contactid] => 003C00000246JvbIAE [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Summary of API-Sponsored Studies of Dispersant Toxicity [abstract] => [name] => Ray Arnold [salutation] => [firstname] => Ray [lastname] => Arnold [title] => Staff Scientist [suffix] => [company] => Chevron Energy Technology Company [bio] => ***Note I am giving this presentation instead of Ray Arnold Jonathan Naile PhD in Ecotoxicology from the University of Saskatchewan Post doctorial fellowship at the US EPA I have been an Ecotoxicologist with Shell Health for 6 years and provide support on various topics ranging from spill response to chemical product registration. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-07T19:20:43Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 5 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lambMAA [contactid] => 003C000002RW7HxIAL [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Analysis of Response Alternatives for the Deepwater Horizon Spill to Inform Response Planning [abstract] => The unprecedented size of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill, the scale of dispersants used, and the novel application of dispersants through subsea dispersant injection (SSDI), have been cause for continued debate on dispersant efficacy and effectiveness in the response, and their overall impact on the broader Gulf of Mexico ecosystem. Policy makers and response decision-makers have identified the shoreline and nearshore zones as priorities for response protection for the DWH and other oil spills. The use of dispersants has been considered a tradeoff between reducing impacts to surface dwelling wildlife (e.g., birds, mammals, sea turtles), shallow-water ecosystems and shorelines versus possibly increasing impacts to the water column offshore. A wide spectrum of regulators, planners, responders, and stakeholders have expressed value in knowing more of the DWH counter-historical case: What would have occurred, what would have been the transport and deposition of DWH oil, and how would have environmental exposures been different if dispersants had not been used? This case would not only provide some clarity on the effectiveness of the DWH response methods but would also provide an important input into preparedness and response decision-making for any similar future incident. Environmental, physical, chemical and oil release information recorded and developed during the DWH incident were used to predict the transport, fate and extent of DWH oil on various compartments of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem (coastal areas and shoreline) for alternative cases of the incident: with the actual response, minus use of any dispersant, minus use of SSDI, with SSDI at recommended amounts of dispersant applied throughout the response, and with no response. Exposures of water surface, shorelines, water column and seabed to oil above thresholds of environmental concern are used to compare relative risks of the response alternatives. [name] => Deborah French-McCay PhD [salutation] => [firstname] => Deborah [lastname] => French-McCay [title] => Director, Research and Model Development [suffix] => PhD [company] => RPS [bio] => Deborah French-McCay, PhD, is the Director of Research and Model Development at RPS in Rhode Island, USA. Dr. French-McCay (formerly Dr. French) received her Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1984. In that same year, she joined Applied Science Associates (ASA), now RPS Ocean Science, a part of RPS Group. Dr. French-McCay specializes in quantitative assessments and modeling of oil and chemical releases for response planning, impact, risk, and natural resource damage assessments (NRDA); evaluating transport and fates, exposure, and effects of pollutants on individual organisms, populations and aquatic ecosystems. Dr. French-McCay leads development of RPS ASA's oil and chemical spill models (SIMAP and CHEMMAP) and manages numerous projects utilizing these models to evaluate oil/chemical trajectory and fate, impacts and environmental risks. In support of the government's NRDA for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of April-July 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico, she modeled oil transport, fate and exposure using SIMAP to evaluate injuries for water column organisms. She has been principal investigator and primary author of more than one hundred technical reports and papers and is an internationally recognized expert in oil spill fate and effects modeling. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078sc7AAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T15:52:00Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:31:48Z )
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Nightmare on Bourbon Street Reception in the Exhibit Hall
Array ( [id] => a0F3b000016hnCNEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-30T22:00:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-30T23:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-30T17:00:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-30T18:00:00 [name] => Nightmare on Bourbon Street Reception in the Exhibit Hall [room] => [notes] => [abstract] => [paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00001293vhEAA [name] => Networking ) ) [speakers] => Array ( ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => Array ( [0] => 0693b0000078ytbAAA ) [sponsorlogos] => Array ( [0] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078ytbAAAw200h100.png ) [modified] => 2019-10-07T22:39:50Z )

Thursday, October 31

8:30 am - 10:00 am
2H: What You Need to Know About Spill Impact Mitigation Analysis (SIMA) and its Broad Range of Practical Applications in a Response
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560M0EAI [starttime] => 2019-10-31T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-31T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-31T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-31T10:00:00 [name] => 2H: What You Need to Know About Spill Impact Mitigation Analysis (SIMA) and its Broad Range of Practical Applications in a Response [room] => 262 [notes] => Title was What is Spill Impact Mitigation Analysis (SIMA)? Needs to be more descriptive. Sent revised proposed title (listed above) to Colin for input 5/15/19 [abstract] =>

Speakers in this session will discuss the Spill Impact Mitigation Assessment (SIMA) process, which is intended to support Net Environmental Benefit Analyses (NEBA). Identified in the session will be key elements required to complete a SIMA which include environmental impacts, health and safety impacts to communities and response workers, as well as cultural and economic concerns associated in the trade-off decision making process associated with an oil spill response. It is hoped that attendees will gain a sense of how to practically apply this approach across a broad range of response scenarios, as these will be considered and evaluated as part of this interactive session.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jeQ4EAI [contactid] => 003C000002G33EGIAZ [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Colin Frazier [salutation] => [firstname] => Colin [lastname] => Frazier [title] => Policy Advisor [suffix] => [company] => American Petroleum Institute [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jeQEEAY [contactid] => 003C000002G33POIAZ [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Brandi Todd [salutation] => [firstname] => Brandi [lastname] => Todd [title] => NOAA SSC [suffix] => [company] => NOAA - Office of Response & Restoration [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-31T16:59:52Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEXa1EAH [contactid] => 003C00000178wTQIAY [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Gina Coelho Ph.D. [salutation] => [firstname] => Gina [lastname] => Coelho [title] => Principal Senior Scientist [suffix] => Ph.D. [company] => Sponson Group Inc. [bio] => Dr. Gina Coelho has over 25 years' experience in oil spill response. She supported the Marine Spill Response Corporation dispersant R&D program from 1993-1995. Since 1996 she worked as a specialist in the areas of dispersant use, policy, contingency planning and decision-making. She has conducted open ocean oil field trials, mesocosm research and laboratory experiments on the efficacy and biological effects of oil, dispersant, and dispersed oil. She has worked as a facilitator on more than a dozen Ecological Risk Assessments for the US Coast Guard, has authored multiple Spill Impact Mitigation Assessment documents, and has set up three dispersed oil testing facilities (in the US, Brazil, and New Zealand). She served as co-Principal Investigator on two NOAA CRRC funded projects: one to examine life-cycle and multi-generational effects of oil and dispersed oil on a marine organism, and a second project to develop a dispersed oil toxicity database to support dispersant-use decision-making. During the Deepwater Horizon spill, Dr. Coelho facilitated subsea dispersant decisions between BP and Federal and state agencies within the Area Command, and developed SSDI monitoring protocols. In recent years, Dr. Coelho has supported the Joint Industry Task Force (JITF) Subsea Dispersant effort for API, which examined SSDI injection systems, efficacy, fate and effects, modeling and communication. She has been a contributing author on several API Technical Reports and on the IPIECA Subsea Dispersant Good Practice Guide. Dr. Coelho served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences Dispersant Committee (2019 book release) and as a co-author on a GoMRI and C-IMAGE consortia joint effort to produce a two book series on deepwater oil spills (also a 2019 book release). [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001JzVaoMAFw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-26T17:33:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEXaLEAX [contactid] => 003C000001MF2oRIAT [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Mike Drieu [salutation] => [firstname] => Mike [lastname] => Drieu [title] => HSE Advisor [suffix] => [company] => Occidental Petroleum [bio] => Michael Drieu is EHS Advisor for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation for technical and management expertise concerning subsea source control key resources, procedures, preparedness, planning and response Technical resource for clarification to regulations, expectations, incident response and management plans and processes. The job also includes in a thorough understanding of the industry Source Control equipment such as general operability and capability. Mike was previously Manager, Response Preparedness - WellCONTAINED for Wild Well Control, Inc., a Houston, Texas based company specializing in worldwide firefighting, well control and related engineering, marine engineering and training services. Expanded position to include subsea well control procedures and exercises, and assisting managing subsea containment equipment for 16 oil and gas operators At Wild Well, Michael has also served as a Project Manager for GOM platform recovery work including costs estimates, asset acquisitions, onshore and offshore project planning, development and implementation of recovery procedures for oil and gas production platforms. He also serves as Incident Commander for WWCI's Spill Management Team. Michael received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from U.S. Coast Guard Academy on 1984 Since April 2010, Mike has played an active role working at Source Control Command Post during the DW Horizon Oil Spill supporting Intervention, Containment and SIMOPS activities. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:47:10Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:47:10Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
4H: OSRO's - 30 Years of Change
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560LREAY [starttime] => 2019-10-31T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-31T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-31T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-31T10:00:00 [name] => 4H: OSRO's - 30 Years of Change [room] => 265 [notes] => Add Modern Day Challenges of Legacy Response Services (TJ Enstrom) Add - GIUES (panel? with Angie Martin, Bryant Smalley, and Matt Edes?) Bryant and Matt not on panel, it's Swackhammer, Dickson and Petrae [abstract] =>

A mixture of technology, risk mitigation, legislation, and corporate social responsibility have created an historically low volume of spills, yet response readiness expectations are at a historical high. In the midst of this genesis OSROs have evolved as essential preparedness partners with the O&G industry. Panelists will focus on key elements to include, modern day challenges with legacy response services, best practices in contracting for response services, and combating GIUE anxiety through practical and mental preparation. Questions and discussion welcomed!

[paneltitle] => Combating GIUE Anxiety-How to Practically and Mentally Prepare [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6dEAG [name] => Track 4: Emerging Trends and Concerns ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jcgrEAA [contactid] => 003C000001nfUF6IAM [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Stephen Kastensmidt [salutation] => [firstname] => Stephen [lastname] => Kastensmidt [title] => Crisis and Emergency Management [suffix] => [company] => Occidental Petroleum [bio] => Stephen is well seasoned in enhancing preparedness and reducing risk. Experienced as a Crisis Manager, Emergency Manager, Safety Engineer, and Risk Manager. Has planned, prepared, and responded to all-hazards threats on four continents. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000077VRxAAMw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-11T15:39:26Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jchaEAA [contactid] => 003C000001GyNgfIAF [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Steve Buschang [salutation] => [firstname] => Steve [lastname] => Buschang [title] => Director of Research and Development State Scientific Support Coordinator [suffix] => [company] => Texas General Land Office [bio] => Program Manager with the Texas General Land Office (GLO) Oil Spill Prevention and Response Division serving in the capacity as both the Director of Research and Development and as the State Scientific Support Coordinator (State SSC). As the Director of Research and Development I oversee an annual budget of 1.25 million dollars that is a dedicated funding stream for oil spill related projects from Texas institutes of higher education. Projects and topics include the development of tidal Inlet protection strategies, the building a near-shore coastal current monitoring network, funding the design of a modern web interface to TGLO TABS model and data products, improving hydrodynamic predictions of surface currents near the Texas coast used for rapid oil spill response, integrating next-generation models into the oil spill prediction system for Texas Bays, and a LiDAR project that involves the geo-environmental mapping of colonial waterbird rookery islands for oil spill response. As the State SSC, I am responsible for managing ongoing GLO projects including the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS), and the Texas Coastal Oil Spill Planning & Response CD Toolkit. The TABS is a system of offshore moorings, and a wave glider, that relay real-time data back to enhance the TGLO and public domain oil spill modeling capabilities. I am engaged in operational ocean observations, forecasts and modeling as GLO's program manager for TABS and the associated modeling program. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000015w2glMAAw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVn8EAH [contactid] => 003C000001YsrtiIAB [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Modern Day Challenges of Legacy Response Services [abstract] => [name] => Tj Engstrom [salutation] => [firstname] => Tj [lastname] => Engstrom [title] => Director-Emergency Services [suffix] => [company] => Clean Harbors [bio] => TJ Engstrom has a B.S. from Montana State University-Department of Engineering, and 10 years of professional experience in Emergency Response Management in the Public and Private Sector. He has held consulting positions with some of the largest Exploration and Production Companies in the world such as British Petroleum and ExxonMobil. TJ Engstrom presently works as an Emergency Response Coordinator for Clean Harbors Environmental Services working with Energy Companies in Emergency Preparedness, Spill Response and related services. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000d1JgeMAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-22T19:37:28Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001GyNkGIAV [name] => James Hanzalik [firstname] => James [lastname] => Hanzalik [title] => Vice President [company] => Clean Gulf Associates ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lYoqMAE [contactid] => 003C000002G33PDIAZ [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Providing Value, Maintaining Proficiency in a Time of Declining Spills [abstract] => It is critical that companies have adequate OSRO resources under contract, that the contracted resources are properly maintained, and that the resources are immediately available at the time of need. In contracting with OSROs, companies must consider many factors, including cost, quality, and assurance of availability. Companies must also take into account the requirements of their regulators, as the contracted resources must satisfy applicable planning requirements. They must also satisfy the demands of their insurers, which may not approve of certain contract terms, such as indemnification clauses (or may deny coverage if such clauses are included). This presentation will suggest how the contracting process, and the value provided by OSROs, can be enhanced. Topics will include: How can companies obtain the best OSRO value, both in terms of retainer costs, and costs of response? What billing practices are best? Which should be avoided? What invoice support should be provided by the OSRO and its subcontractors? How can companies extract more value from their OSROs? For example, are there steady state projects where the OSRO's resources could be utilized, without impacting their availability in the event a spill occurs? How can the contracting process be simplified? Do OSRO contracts have to be lengthy documents? What are the key contract terms a company should look for? How can companies vet OSROs, and the subcontractors that the OSROs rely on, to ensure that resources are being properly maintained, and that they will function when needed? How is the contracted OSRO maintaining the spill response proficiency of its employees, given the low incidence of oil spills today? Is my OSRO going to be available if I expand my operations to Inland areas, or outside the US? What additional contract terms might come into play when you ask an OSRO to respond outside the US? This presentation could be part of a larger discussion of how response plans are developed, and how QIs, plan writers and OSROs assist in this process. Or, it could be part of a panel discussing parties' expectations of their OSROs and their suggestions for how OSROs could provide greater value for their customers. [name] => Michael Sample [salutation] => [firstname] => Michael [lastname] => Sample [title] => Vice President & General Counsel [suffix] => [company] => Marine Spill Response Corporation [bio] => Mike Sample is the Vice President and General Counsel of the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC). Prior to joining MSRC in 1994, Mike was Counsel to BHP Petroleum in Hawaii. Between BHP and MSRC, he has almost thirty years' experience in contingency planning, response contracting and pollution response. Mike received his law degree from Stanford Law School in 1986. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078UOBAA2w500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-11T21:06:25Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) [4] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b00001AEVrUEAX [contactid] => 003C000001MF35qIAD [function] => Panel Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Angie Martin P.E., CHMM [salutation] => [firstname] => Angie [lastname] => Martin [title] => Vice President [suffix] => [company] => Heritage Environmental Services [bio] => Angie is currently serving as Vice President at Heritage Environmental Services overseeing national emergency response, waste allocation, supply chain, sustainability, and customer training efforts. Mrs. Martin is currently the Secretary of the Spill Control Association of America, serves on the board of directors for The Pesticide Stewardship Alliance, and represents Heritage on the Environmental Technology Council. She has participated in many national scale emergency response efforts and leads Heritage's rapid response team. Angie frequently speaks on emerging regulatory trends and challenges including PFAS, e-manifest, and the Generator Improvements Rules. She works with industry partners to ensure the proper distribution of hazardous and industrial wastes for our customers. She is a registered Professional Engineer in multiple states with significant experience in environmental engineering and regulatory services. Her background also includes industrial permitting, hazardous and non-hazardous waste management, environmental auditing, and remediation. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000wEJRZMA4w500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-30T19:18:57Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 6 ) [5] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019n0RzEAI [contactid] => 003C0000018NXVgIAO [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => J. Troy Swackhammer Ch.E. [salutation] => [firstname] => J. Troy [lastname] => Swackhammer [title] => Chemical Engineer [suffix] => Ch.E. [company] => US EPA - Region 10 [bio] => Academics: B.S. Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, 1988 M.S., Civil-Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 1994 Work Experience: • Versar, Inc. and SAIC, Virginia offices, 1988-1992: Environmental consulting engineering work in the areas of insurance and property acquisition audits and UST compliance. • Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, 1992-1996: Environmental engineering work for DCA and IAD, with focus on AST and UST compliance. • U.S. EPA, 1997-present: Member of oil regulation and policy team in Office of Emergency Management working on oil spill prevention and preparedness policies and regulations under 40 CFR 112, which includes the Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) and the Facility Response Plan (FRP) regulations. Currently serve as national lead on FRP coordination. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-08-22T19:42:42Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 7 ) [6] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019n0SEEAY [contactid] => 003C000001GyNjSIAV [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => MST1 Hugo Gaytan [salutation] => [firstname] => Hugo [lastname] => Gaytan [title] => Program Manager [suffix] => [company] => U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Marine Environmental Response Policy (CG-MER) [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-08-29T17:01:15Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 8 ) [7] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000019n0SOEAY [contactid] => 003C000001nfUHHIA2 [function] => Panelist [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Gary Petrae [salutation] => [firstname] => Gary [lastname] => Petrae [title] => Senior Preparedness Analyst [suffix] => [company] => Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) [bio] => Gary is a Senior Preparedness Analyst in the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Oil Spill Preparedness Division, Gulf of Mexico Preparedness Section in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Section is responsible for regulatory compliance with the Oil Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line - 30 CFR Part 254
Prior to joining BSEE, Gary served as a NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator on the Deepwater Horizon MC252 Incident Management Team. Previously, Gary was with the NOAA Commissioned Corps where two of his career assignments were as Scientific Support Coordinator in Miami and Long Beach and as Chief SSC where he also served as the NOAA Regional Response Team representative to Regions Four, Six and Caribbean. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-08-22T19:44:18Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 9 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-11T21:06:25Z )
8:30 am - 10:00 am
5H: Environmental Unit (EU) and Response Considerations
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560MPEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-31T13:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-31T15:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-31T08:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-31T10:00:00 [name] => 5H: Environmental Unit (EU) and Response Considerations [room] => 266 [notes] => Add Role of the EU in Agency Liaison During a Response (Helen Dubach) [abstract] =>

This session will address the role of the Environmental Unit, as well as some response planning and tactical considerations for responses on Texas beaches and Chemical Hazard assessments.

[paneltitle] => [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6QEAW [name] => Track 5: Response/Restoration ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jjPyEAI [contactid] => 0038000000ZQqaUAAT [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Robert Simmons PE [salutation] => [firstname] => Robert [lastname] => Simmons [title] => President [suffix] => PE [company] => Environmental Science Services [bio] => Robert Simmons is a registered Professional Engineer in Mechanical and Environmental engineering in Louisiana. He is the President and a Principal of Environmental Science Services, Inc. (Es²). Es² is an environmental consulting firm specializing in GIS/Mapping, oil spill response and Environmental Unit management and support including drills, NRDA, SCAT and Spill Management. He is retained by the Water Quality Insurance Syndicate as a Principal Surveyor and Consultant and spill Manager. Robert has over 30 years of oil industry and spill response experience, and has been involved in the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill response, the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill response, and over 400 others in between and after. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000001MzBV5MANw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:13Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jpXOEAY [contactid] => 003C000001YsraGIAR [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Role of the EU in Agency Liaison During a Response [abstract] => Oil spill response priorities often vary among the RP and regulatory agencies. The pressures of managing a spill can be amplified when expectations differ among the RP and regulatory entities. The roles of Unified Command and the Liaison Officer are designed to develop and maintain relationships and allow consensus decision making during a response. Although the Environmental Unit is first and foremost a technical role that provides data, documentation and recommendations, a skilled Environmental Unit Lead will pay close attention to the objectives, responsibilities, requirements, and expectations of involved regulatory agencies. The Environmental Unit lead should be familiar with regulatory requirements and with the agencies involved. Relevant agencies will typically deploy to a medium to large oil spill response, however smaller spills may not require actual deployment or maintenance of a full Incident Command Post (ICP). Alternatively, at a certain point in a response, agencies may find that they can continue to work remotely, without the need for a full-time presence in the ICP. In these cases, there remains the requirement for agency approval of plans, situational updates, and consensus decisions. Coordinating the transfer of information and establishing communication contacts with remote working agencies early in the response ensures that regulators receive the information they need for decision-making, planning approval, and reporting. Fostering these important components creates a positive response relationship and helps maintain forward momentum in a response. For this presentation, the authors review case studies of varying sizes of responses to demonstrate the importance to the Environmental Unit role in communicating with regulatory agencies, achieving consensus decisions, and maintaining good relationships. [name] => Helen Dubach [salutation] => [firstname] => Helen [lastname] => Dubach [title] => Manager, Readiness [suffix] => [company] => CTEH RM [bio] => Helen has over 20 years' experience in the environmental and oil spill field. She provides scientific support for oil and chemical spill responses and exercises, specifically relating to Environmental Unit decisions. Helen has attended and advised on numerous oil and chemical spills worldwide, providing scientific and technical advice. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC000000kAw9CMASw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-08-29T22:07:29Z [coauthors] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [contactid] => 0033b00002SpoeoAAB [name] => Stephen Ratley [firstname] => Stephen [lastname] => Ratley [title] => Emergency Response Coordinator [company] => Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality ) [1] => Array ( [contactid] => 003C000001P85ZFIAZ [name] => Bryant Smalley [firstname] => Bryant [lastname] => Smalley [title] => Oil Spill & Response Team Leader and Federal On-Scene Coordinator [company] => U.S. EPA, Region 6 ) ) [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 2 ) [2] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019lcQiMAI [contactid] => 003C000001GyNn9IAF [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Oil Spill Response on Gulf Beaches in Texas [abstract] => As the State's lead agency in coastal oil spill response, the Texas General Land Office (TGLO) has responded to more than 210,000 gallons of oil spilled in the nearshore environments of the Gulf of Mexico and on the gulf beaches of the South Texas Coastal Zone. A presentation covering seasonal tar impacts to south Texas beaches and oil spill response on gulf facing sandy beach shorelines will be given. Planning, rapid assessments, local & Federal partnerships, stakeholder engagement, public perception, and response operations based on minimal impacts to both the local environment and economy all come together to deliver the "best response" concept and maximize the potential for success. Goals of applicable GLO funded research & development projects such as tidal inlet protection strategy development, creation of a database to help determine sources of unknown tar, and spatially enabling resources at risk and best management practices through the GLO toolkit will be discussed. Foreign exploration and production in Mexican waters, proposed deepwater port projects offshore, and the arrival of Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCCs) to the Corpus Christi Ship Channel all pose new threats to the beaches and nearshore waters of south Texas and therefore represent a priority for local contingency planning efforts. [name] => Brent Koza [salutation] => [firstname] => Brent [lastname] => Koza [title] => Corpus Christi Regional Manager [suffix] => [company] => Texas General Land Office [bio] => Brent has worked for the Texas General Land Office (GLO) - Oil Spill Prevention and Response Division since 2005. Brent's focus includes contingency planning and oil spill response operations. Prior to working at the GLO, Brent worked as a biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Geological Survey, The Nature Conservancy, and the Center for Coastal Studies at Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi. Brent graduated with a Master of Science Degree from Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi in 2006. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/0693b0000078Q8TAAUw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T20:05:36Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 3 ) [3] => Array ( [id] => a0GC0000019la9BMAQ [contactid] => 003C000001iHnBvIAK [function] => Speaker [abstracttitle] => Effective Hazard Assessments for Chemical Response [abstract] => Effective hazard assessments are comprehensive, detailed, and actionable. Hazard assessments must ensure that observed threats to people, property, and the environment are not only documented but incorporated into planning strategies for control and risk reduction. Operations involving chemical response require a heightened sense of hazard discovery. The severity of a chemical hazard is based on the toxicity, physical state and mobility, nature of containment, reactivity/compatibility, and exposure pathways. An effective hazard assessment should yield a high level of awareness to the dangers resulting from chemical presence in the emergency response environment. It should also be used to prescribe control measures such as task-based PPE & respiratory protection, emission or contaminant generation control, fire safety, site control, decontamination, and monitoring strategies. The objectives of this session are: 1) to define the components of a hazard assessment for chemical response, 2) discuss the task-based hazard assessment strategy, and 3) illuminate how hazard assessments compliment site safety plans, JSAs, and tailgate briefings. [name] => Scott Skelton [salutation] => [firstname] => Scott [lastname] => Skelton [title] => Senior IH/ER Consultant [suffix] => [company] => CTEH, LLC [bio] => Scott Skelton currently serves as a Senior IH/ER Consultant for CTEH®. Mr. Skelton focuses on special industrial hygiene projects with emphasis in worker exposure and exposure control for Emergency Response, as well as serving as an expert witness for IH-related litigation and project support. Mr. Skelton is a Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) from the American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH) with experience in emergency response, industrial hygiene, and health and safety industries. Mr. Skelton received a Bachelor of Science in Biology with a minor in Chemistry from Arkansas State University, and a Master of Science in Industrial Hygiene from Montana Tech University. Mr. Skelton has an extensive background in emergency response, toxicology, industrial hygiene, and health and safety. [photo] => https://2019.cleangulf.org/files/sf/00PC0000015uSzwMAEw500h500.png [modified] => 2019-10-07T21:01:36Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 4 ) ) [slot] => [sponsorlogoids] => [sponsorlogos] => Array ( ) [modified] => 2019-10-07T21:01:36Z )
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
2I: Wildlife Response Preparation and Planning
Array ( [id] => a0F3b00001560MAEAY [starttime] => 2019-10-31T15:30:00Z [endtime] => 2019-10-31T17:00:00Z [localstarttime] => 2019-10-31T10:30:00 [localendtime] => 2019-10-31T12:00:00 [name] => 2I: Wildlife Response Preparation and Planning [room] => 262 [notes] => Add - Managing affected Species, Tri State, TBD (Rhonda to invite), Healthcare Team, Nuerez, LSU (Jill to invite), Logisit of Animal Care, Clean Gulf Associates (Rhonda to invite), Q&A - can't be more than 5 people on panel [abstract] =>

Effective Wildlife response requires excellent planning and preparedness in resource areas: (1) facilities; (2) people; (3) Wildlife Care Teams. This session will introduce guidelines for planning and preparation response for affected wildlife. The session end with a question and answer panel of experienced wildlife responders.

[paneltitle] => Panel Discussion: Wildlife Rehabilitation - What Does it Take to Make it Work? [panelabstract] => [tracks] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0H3b00000zRQ6TEAW [name] => Track 2: Planning and Preparedness ) ) [speakers] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jeaPEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001nfU9mIAE [function] => Chair [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Andy Tirpak [salutation] => [firstname] => Andy [lastname] => Tirpak [title] => Principal [suffix] => [company] => A To Sea Environmental [bio] => [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - accepted [placement] => 1 ) [1] => Array ( [id] => a0G3b000018jeaZEAQ [contactid] => 003C000001OTJfMIAX [function] => Moderator [abstracttitle] => [abstract] => [name] => Sharon Schmalz [salutation] => [firstname] => Sharon [lastname] => Schmalz [title] => Executive Director [suffix] => [company] => The Wildlife Center of Texas [bio] => Sharon Schmalz is the Executive Director of The Wildlife Center of Texas (WCT) located in Houston, Texas. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University with B.S. degrees in Computer Science/Mathematics. As one of the largest wildlife centers in the nation, WCT cares for over 10,000 wild animals each year and over 350 different species. WCT also educates over 50,000 adults and children about wildlife, conservation and the environment. The center is actively involved in wildlife emergency response including wildfires, hurricanes, and oil spills. Currently, Sharon works with senior fourth-year veterinary students from Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine that are required to participate in a two-week, graded rotation on the Houston SPCA campus including The Wildlife Center of Texas. For over 30 years, Ms. Schmalz has maintained the multiple state and federal permits necessary to care for injured, orphaned, endangered, educational and oiled wildlife. A founding member of the Wildlife Center of Texas Oiled Wildlife Response Team, she has acted as the director for 30 years and has responded to over 70 oil spills. The team responds to oiled wildlife in both inland and coastal areas. She was involved in the development of the "Best Practices for Migratory Bird Care During Oil Spill Response" document in Anchorage, Alaska in 2001. For over 18 years, Ms. Schmalz has coordinated oiled wildlife response workshops for the Texas General Land Office and for industry and maintained the resulting database of potential volunteers for response. [photo] => [modified] => 2019-07-22T17:14:07Z [status] => Request - acce